Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsZucchini
IN THE NEWS

Zucchini

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE / Special to The Herald-Mail | July 14, 2010
The zucchini is probably the best-known member of the summer squash family. Zucchini is very low in calories and a good source of vitamin C, fiber, potassium and magnesium. The green-skinned variety is a source of carotenoid pigment that helps protect against cataracts and macular degeneration, so be sure to eat the tender skin on the zucchini. When choosing zucchini, pick firm, slender squash that are free of soft spots or wrinkled skin. For best quality, choose those that are 6 to 8 inches long and not more than 2 inches in diameter.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | August 21, 2010
WILLIAMSPORT - Nonie Johnson, 74, loves eating fresh foods. Even when she and her husband of 54 years, Roger, moved from Martinsburg, W.Va., to Homewood at Williamsport, it was hard to give up their garden. But at the retirement community, Johnson still has a little patch of land to cultivate. "It's near the creek," she said. "We try to go there every day. " That's where she picked the zucchini she used for two dishes -zucchini pie and zucchini dessert. Although, she admits that this dry, hot summer limited the number of squash she was able to grow.
NEWS
By HEATHER LOWERY | August 8, 2010
Carolyn Etzler, 58, of Hagerstown, recently won champion in the cake division for adults at the Washington County Ag Expo by using a fruit and vegetable not usually paired. Etzler's pineapple zucchini cake with penuche frosting won her the top spot in the cake division for adults. Etzler entered the contest last year and won Grand Champion in the cake division for her Wacky Cake, a chocolate cake with peanut butter icing. Etzler has been baking since she was 13 years old, when her grandmother gave her a cookbook.
NEWS
December 8, 1998
1 cup dry quinoa (or rice) 2 cups water 5 small zucchinis 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 2 or 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger 3 tablespoons sunflower seeds 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1 green bell pepper, chopped 3 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons lemon juice Place quinoa or rice in water, bring to a boil, then...
NEWS
September 22, 2008
Leah Jones, 3, helped grow and pick this 35-inch, 9-pound zucchini, her mother said. Christa Jones said their garden produced six zucchinis of similar size and weight this summer. Although they shared most of the vegetables with their friends, Leah still learned how to make a lot of zucchini bread, Christa Jones said.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
1 (16-ounce) round loaf bread (multi-grain, sourdough or another firm loaf) 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon dried whole oregano 1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup fresh mushrooms, sliced 6 (1/4 inch thick) tomato slices 2 (1/4 inch thick) red or Vidalia onion slices, separated into rings 2 cups shredded zucchini 8 (1-ounce) slices lean turkey 6 (1-ounce)
NEWS
July 7, 1998
Fruit and vegetable lovers, it's time to take a stand. Summer's succulent bounty is cropping up at area farmers' markets, produce counters and roadside tables. This raises an important question: Should you pull back the husks on corn to see what the kernels look like? --cont from lifestyle -- It's best to ask first, says Lynn F. Little, family and consumer sciences extension educator for University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.
NEWS
July 9, 2003
(Preparation 1 hour) 4 medium zucchini and-or summer squash (2 pounds), halved lengthwise and then cut crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces Kosher salt 1 pound farfalle pasta 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 medium garlic cloves, minced or pressed through a garlic press (about 1 tablespoon) 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pint grape tomatoes, cut into halves 1/2 cup packed chopped fresh basil leaves 2 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted Parmesan cheese, to serve Toss the zucchini and-or squash with 1 tablespoon kosher salt in a medium bowl.
NEWS
By LYNNE CHAR BENNETT/San Francisco Chronicle | August 19, 2010
In many folks' minds (mine included), summer squash means green zucchini. You've probably heard about someone with an overabundant garden who sneakily leaves a surfeit of squash on neighbors' porches and who totes zucchini to work to share with colleagues. It's been awhile since I've been blessed with such a garden or such a neighbor. But that doesn't stop me from enjoying all the tender-skinned summer squashes. Nowadays, green zucchini is just one of many varieties you can find.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call during the week. The Mail Call number is 301-791-6236. You are welcome to leave a recorded message on any subject, but some calls will be screened out. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "In response for the return for the recipe for zucchini crabcakes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | January 10, 2012
Editor's note: This is part of an occasional series of stories on children eating vegetables. The series explores ways to highlight vegetables' flavor and appearance as a way to work around the resistance some kids have to eating vegetables. We eat with our eyes first. If foods don't look delicious, we assume they won't be delicious. That's one of the concepts underlying The Herald-Mail's series on encouraging children to try eating seasonal vegetables. One way to get a kid to try a new food is to make it look tasty.
Advertisement
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | August 21, 2010
WILLIAMSPORT - Nonie Johnson, 74, loves eating fresh foods. Even when she and her husband of 54 years, Roger, moved from Martinsburg, W.Va., to Homewood at Williamsport, it was hard to give up their garden. But at the retirement community, Johnson still has a little patch of land to cultivate. "It's near the creek," she said. "We try to go there every day. " That's where she picked the zucchini she used for two dishes -zucchini pie and zucchini dessert. Although, she admits that this dry, hot summer limited the number of squash she was able to grow.
NEWS
By LYNNE CHAR BENNETT/San Francisco Chronicle | August 19, 2010
In many folks' minds (mine included), summer squash means green zucchini. You've probably heard about someone with an overabundant garden who sneakily leaves a surfeit of squash on neighbors' porches and who totes zucchini to work to share with colleagues. It's been awhile since I've been blessed with such a garden or such a neighbor. But that doesn't stop me from enjoying all the tender-skinned summer squashes. Nowadays, green zucchini is just one of many varieties you can find.
NEWS
By HEATHER LOWERY | August 8, 2010
Carolyn Etzler, 58, of Hagerstown, recently won champion in the cake division for adults at the Washington County Ag Expo by using a fruit and vegetable not usually paired. Etzler's pineapple zucchini cake with penuche frosting won her the top spot in the cake division for adults. Etzler entered the contest last year and won Grand Champion in the cake division for her Wacky Cake, a chocolate cake with peanut butter icing. Etzler has been baking since she was 13 years old, when her grandmother gave her a cookbook.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | August 1, 2010
Dear Lynne: Is my sister imagining things when she says stainless steel gets rid of the smell of garlic and onions on her hands? She says she rubs her hands on a stainless bowl and the smell is gone. -- Deannie in Lincoln Dear Deannie: Try it yourself. It works. Stainless steel can remove the odors of garlic and onions. One chemistry source speculates it's because the sulfur in garlic and onions (which gives them the strong aromas) is attracted to and binds with one or more of the metals in stainless steel, diminishing odors.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE / Special to The Herald-Mail | July 14, 2010
The zucchini is probably the best-known member of the summer squash family. Zucchini is very low in calories and a good source of vitamin C, fiber, potassium and magnesium. The green-skinned variety is a source of carotenoid pigment that helps protect against cataracts and macular degeneration, so be sure to eat the tender skin on the zucchini. When choosing zucchini, pick firm, slender squash that are free of soft spots or wrinkled skin. For best quality, choose those that are 6 to 8 inches long and not more than 2 inches in diameter.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | August 10, 2009
Dear Lynne: An Italian restaurant in New York had these vegetables waiting on a side table, not refrigerated. They were served before the meal and with bread to soak up their juices. Our kids treat vegetables like poison, but these they liked. Tastes were like halfway between pickled and marinated, especially the carrots (which I never think of as an Italian vegetable) and the zucchini. Was this a New York specialty, or was it authentic Italian? Do you have recipes? -- Thanks, Lucy from Winona, Minn.
NEWS
September 22, 2008
Leah Jones, 3, helped grow and pick this 35-inch, 9-pound zucchini, her mother said. Christa Jones said their garden produced six zucchinis of similar size and weight this summer. Although they shared most of the vegetables with their friends, Leah still learned how to make a lot of zucchini bread, Christa Jones said.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 7, 2008
SMITHSBURG - A fan of cooking from scratch, Debbie Doyle's proximity to fresh produce puts her in a good place. Doyle, who lives off Jefferson Boulevard near Smithsburg, is strides away from farmers markets and orchards. Her neighbors, avid gardeners, are always willing to offload their extras. So in her kitchen, that translates to lots of from-scratch tomato sauce made from fresh, locally grown tomatoes, or peach-custard pies made from fruit plucked from the tree that day. Right now, zucchini is the produce of the moment.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|