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By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 24, 2012
The only Youth Aid Panel remaining in Franklin County, Pa., takes on cases every month to help first-time criminal offenders clean up their juvenile records. Waynesboro-area children accused of offenses like curfew violations, retail theft, tobacco on school property and disorderly conduct can avoid court costs and fines with successful completion of a three- to six-month program. Each participant has his or her case reviewed by the panel and is assigned a mentor. “They in essence write a contract and say, 'This is what you need to do.' It holds them accountable, and, hopefully, it's their first offense, and it doesn't happen again,” Magisterial District Judge Larry Pentz said.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | April 1, 2012
West Virginia's first Juvenile Drug Court opened in Cabell County, W.Va., in 1999, and it's taken 13 years for the benefits of the program to reach out to youngsters heading for trouble in the Eastern Panhandle. Family Court Judge David Greenberg, who presides in Berkeley and Jefferson counties, is heading the local program. He said it's designed to keep offenders ages 10 to 17 who use drugs or are at high risk for substance abuse out of jail and on a path to a productive life free of drug use. The program is part of a national movement.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | February 5, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - After haltingly reading a statement of remorse, a man convicted of driving under the influence and causing a wreck that killed a passenger in his car was sentenced Wednesday to serve time at the Anthony Correctional Center rather than prison. Derek M. O'Donnell, 22, of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., will spend six months to two years at the facility, which is for young offenders. He pleaded no contest on Nov. 5, 2003, to one count of DUI causing death.
NEWS
April 21, 1997
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - West Virginia is looking at spending $63.7 million on juvenile offenders in the 1997 fiscal year, including $23 million to out-of-state agencies because of a lack of in-state services, a state official said recently. "I think it's clear there's a broad-based agreement the structure needs to be changed," said Scott Boileau, acting commissioner of the Bureau for Children and Families at the West Virginia Health and Human Resources.
NEWS
October 6, 1997
When the VisionQuest wilderness camp for juvenile offenders opened on the campus of the South Mountain Restoration Center in 1992, officials said that although the young offenders wouldn't be fenced in, they would be heavily supervised to prevent escapes. Five years later, after a steady stream of escapes, including 12 in the past two months, neighbors say they've had enough. We agree with them; it's time for a change in security arrangements there. Camp officials originally believed that the relative isolation of the Franklin County site would deter youths from running away, as they had at the rate of more than 30 a year in a similar camp in Reading, Pa. Intense community pressure forced the closing of that camp, and many of its workers were transferred to the Franklin County facility.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | May 15, 2004
Shiny white porcelain bathroom fixtures were supposed to make the Western Maryland Children's Center feel more like home and less like a jail for young offenders awaiting trial. Instead, youths broke the fragile toilet seats and used the knife-like shards as weapons. Now, the state Department of Juvenile Services is adding up the cost of replacing the eight-month-old fixtures with industry-standard stainless steel. No one was seriously injured at the center south of Hagerstown, but an independent monitor's report in March called it a "major crisis with regard to the health, safety and security of youth and staff.
NEWS
by ROBERT SNYDER | May 26, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Not too many years ago, juvenile offenders in West Virginia had limited opportunites for rehabilitation, former Berkeley County lawmaker Vicki V. Douglas said. Results of the work that spanned Douglas' entire legislative career were on display Thursday as state and local leaders gathered in Martinsburg to dedicate the reopening of a center for troubled youth in the Eastern Panhandle. The Vicki V. Douglas Juvenile Center, when it reopens in July, will expand to 23 the number of rooms available to house young offenders from Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | February 10, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Citing the heinous nature of the crime, a judge on Monday refused to sentence a man convicted of robbing and kidnapping an 83-year-old woman to the Anthony Center, a facility for young offenders that serves as an alternative to prison. Belcher Grady, 20, of Fairfax Street in Martinsburg, was instead sentenced to two 20-year prison terms, to be served concurrently, said Circuit Judge David Sanders. On Dec. 10, 2003, Grady entered an Alford plea to one count of kidnapping and one count of first-degree robbery.
NEWS
September 22, 2000
Maryland's lawmakers must clean up juvenile justice mess Maryland's Secretary of Juvenile Justice says that before he took office in April, the department squandered millions of dollars on a computer system that works so poorly that officials can't even tell how many children are in the system. Bishop Robinson's proposals to fix what's wrong are likely to cost plenty, and raise questions as to who was minding the store. The department's computer system, Robinson said, cost $14.3 million, about $5.4 million more than original estimates.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 24, 2012
The only Youth Aid Panel remaining in Franklin County, Pa., takes on cases every month to help first-time criminal offenders clean up their juvenile records. Waynesboro-area children accused of offenses like curfew violations, retail theft, tobacco on school property and disorderly conduct can avoid court costs and fines with successful completion of a three- to six-month program. Each participant has his or her case reviewed by the panel and is assigned a mentor. “They in essence write a contract and say, 'This is what you need to do.' It holds them accountable, and, hopefully, it's their first offense, and it doesn't happen again,” Magisterial District Judge Larry Pentz said.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | April 1, 2012
West Virginia's first Juvenile Drug Court opened in Cabell County, W.Va., in 1999, and it's taken 13 years for the benefits of the program to reach out to youngsters heading for trouble in the Eastern Panhandle. Family Court Judge David Greenberg, who presides in Berkeley and Jefferson counties, is heading the local program. He said it's designed to keep offenders ages 10 to 17 who use drugs or are at high risk for substance abuse out of jail and on a path to a productive life free of drug use. The program is part of a national movement.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 28, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The trial for a man who could receive a life sentence with mercy under West Virginia's three-strikes rule is expected to begin Tuesday after 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge Christopher C. Wilkes denied defense motions in the case on Monday. Charles E. Redman, 41, who was found guilty of the felony offense of unlawful assault by a jury on June 1, could receive a life sentence as a recidivist. Life with mercy means Redman could be considered for parole after serving 15 years, but there is no guarantee he would ever be released from prison.
NEWS
August 8, 2006
Seven fatal shootings in 13 days. No, not in Baltimore or Washington, D.C., but in the Tri-State area. It's time for a closer look at what may be driving these incidents, in case this is more than a horrible set of coincidences. That won't be easy. There is no discernible pattern and few similarities except that two incidents allegedly involved couples having domestic problems. The federal government moved to deal with domestic violence in 1994, when President Clinton signed the Violence Against Women Act, which offered money and resources to states to deal with the problem in a number of ways.
NEWS
by ROBERT SNYDER | May 26, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Not too many years ago, juvenile offenders in West Virginia had limited opportunites for rehabilitation, former Berkeley County lawmaker Vicki V. Douglas said. Results of the work that spanned Douglas' entire legislative career were on display Thursday as state and local leaders gathered in Martinsburg to dedicate the reopening of a center for troubled youth in the Eastern Panhandle. The Vicki V. Douglas Juvenile Center, when it reopens in July, will expand to 23 the number of rooms available to house young offenders from Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | May 15, 2004
Shiny white porcelain bathroom fixtures were supposed to make the Western Maryland Children's Center feel more like home and less like a jail for young offenders awaiting trial. Instead, youths broke the fragile toilet seats and used the knife-like shards as weapons. Now, the state Department of Juvenile Services is adding up the cost of replacing the eight-month-old fixtures with industry-standard stainless steel. No one was seriously injured at the center south of Hagerstown, but an independent monitor's report in March called it a "major crisis with regard to the health, safety and security of youth and staff.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | February 10, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Citing the heinous nature of the crime, a judge on Monday refused to sentence a man convicted of robbing and kidnapping an 83-year-old woman to the Anthony Center, a facility for young offenders that serves as an alternative to prison. Belcher Grady, 20, of Fairfax Street in Martinsburg, was instead sentenced to two 20-year prison terms, to be served concurrently, said Circuit Judge David Sanders. On Dec. 10, 2003, Grady entered an Alford plea to one count of kidnapping and one count of first-degree robbery.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | February 5, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - After haltingly reading a statement of remorse, a man convicted of driving under the influence and causing a wreck that killed a passenger in his car was sentenced Wednesday to serve time at the Anthony Correctional Center rather than prison. Derek M. O'Donnell, 22, of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., will spend six months to two years at the facility, which is for young offenders. He pleaded no contest on Nov. 5, 2003, to one count of DUI causing death.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | October 27, 2003
shappell@herald-mail.com Juveniles being held at the Western Maryland Children's Center are getting the extra care and attention in the classroom that may not have been available to many of them in more conventional school settings, the supervisor of the center's teachers said. Juvenile offenders at the Children's Center, like their counterparts attending public or private high schools, are spending a large portion of their time in a classroom. The center's education program is designed as a 30-day program providing the "basics" mandated by the Maryland Department of Education, Teachers Supervisor Melanie Graves said.
NEWS
September 22, 2000
Maryland's lawmakers must clean up juvenile justice mess Maryland's Secretary of Juvenile Justice says that before he took office in April, the department squandered millions of dollars on a computer system that works so poorly that officials can't even tell how many children are in the system. Bishop Robinson's proposals to fix what's wrong are likely to cost plenty, and raise questions as to who was minding the store. The department's computer system, Robinson said, cost $14.3 million, about $5.4 million more than original estimates.
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