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Yogurt

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NEWS
November 29, 2006
1 (12-ounce cup) light fruit yogurt 8 ounces reduced-fat whipped topping Whisk the yogurt and whipped topping in medium bowl. Pour mixture into eight plastic cups. Freeze for two hours so the mixture has the consistency of ice cream. Serves 8. - Courtesy of Virginia Rodgers of Hagerstown
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | April 21, 1998
by Joe Crocetta / staff photographer see the enlargement At its most basic dictionary-definition level, yogurt is a thick, semisolid food made from milk fermented by a bacterium. Yuck. Does that sound like something that's going to sell a lot of school lunches? Toward the end of 1996, U.S. Department of Agriculture approved yogurt as a meat substitute for the school lunch program. Kids across the country may have had a cartoon image of trying to eat a messy sandwich of yogurt sliding off a hamburger bun. Relax.
NEWS
March 5, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer Carrie White would rather see a McDonald's hamburger than a cup of yogurt on the lunch menu at Clear Spring High School. She turns up her nose at the mention of yogurt, which recently was approved as a replacement for meat at schools across the country. "It makes me want to barf," says the ninth-grade student. But for some other area students, yogurt is an appealing substitute for meatier options such as hamburgers, cheese steak sandwiches and chicken patties.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | January 8, 2013
It's winter. Time to try new ideas for getting vegetables in your children. I know what parents go through to get kids to eat vegetables. I was a kid once, and I hated finding vegetables I didn't like hidden in my food. I love pizza, but if a pizza had onions visible on it, I didn't eat it. If beef stew had green beans or peas in it, I plucked them out. Mushrooms in my soup? No way. Now I'm older and my tastes have matured, and I find many vegetables delicious. Still, there are times when I don't have time to chop veggies for a big salad or cook up a soup or stew.
LIFESTYLE
June 28, 2011
I have worked as the City of Hagerstown's market coordinator for more than two years. I learned a number of things from my vendors, including how to be a better cook, thanks in part to the products they offer. In my free time, I spend time with my family, reading anything on Ireland and history and watching old movies. I gathered fruit for this salad from vendors at the Market Faire and the historic City Farmers' Market. I bought fruit from Bingaman's Greenhouse, Litton's Berries & Produce, Hickory Haven Farm and The Farmer's Daughter; yogurt from Dave Elliott of Blue Mountain Farm; and cream cheese pound cake from R&B Baked Goods & More.
NEWS
November 29, 2006
2 cups fat-free, reduced-sugar vanilla yogurt 1 small box sugar-free instant white chocolate or vanilla pudding mix 8 ounces frozen reduced-fat or fat-free whipped topping 1 (20-ounce) can unsweetened pineapple tidbits, drain the juice 1 (11-ounce) can mandarin oranges, drain the juice 1/2 cup halved red seedless grapes Whisk the yogurt and pudding mix together in a large bowl for 2 minutes or until thickened. Fold in the whipped topping. Fold in the fruit. Pour into a 9-inch-by-13-inch pan. Refrigerate until it has the consistency of pudding.
NEWS
by ERICA COLLIFLOWER | February 27, 2007
Review Would you ever believe that strawberry yogurt could remotely taste like chocolate yogurt? Author Brian Wansink says it can. Well, provided you are eating it in the dark and are expecting it to taste like a scrumptious chocolate yogurt. Wansink conducted an experiment just like that - eating yogurt in the dark - and writes about it in his new book, "Mindless Eating. " This book explores the influence of outside factors on our eating habits. Factors such as location, plate and cup size influence whether we want to eat more or less.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
- by Lynn F. Little To help us improve our eating habits, the USDA developed the Food Guide Pyramid in which foods are clustered into five groups based on the nutrients they provide. For optimum health, you need the nutrients supplied by all the food groups. No one food group is more important than another, although more servings per day are required from some groups than others in order to meet daily nutrient needs. June is Dairy Month, so this is a good time to take a look at the milk, yogurt and cheese group and how we include those foods in our diets.
NEWS
by Lynn Little | May 7, 2003
More and more people report they don't cook anymore. So what are they eating - all fast foods and restaurant meals? Most budgets (and waistlines) can't sustain a long period of eating every meal out, so what's one to do? Many people have discovered the art of healthy eating without all the hours in the kitchen. By combining the skills of layering a sandwich, chopping fresh fruits and vegetables, you have the recipe for a healthy meal - no cooking required. Add a few more skills like heating up precooked, canned, frozen or deli foods, microwaving fresh or frozen vegetables, or adding a topping to a microwave baked potato and create a multitude of healthy menus with little work.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | July 13, 2012
The summer fun continues with this delicious summer creation, blending two summer squash to bring out the best in both. The secret to this dish? Make sure your cumin and curry powder are fresh. Anything older than six months needs to be tossed out. For some flavor variations, try adding honey or using it to drizzle over the soup before serving. Or try a fruit-flavored yogurt such as peach or honey vanilla to really showcase the soup. This is a great make-ahead soup that you can store in the fridge for a delicious creamy pick-me-up the next day. Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Lynn Little | May 14, 2013
A smoothie is a blended and sometimes sweetened beverage made from fresh fruit and perhaps chocolate or peanut butter. They can also contain milk, yogurt or ice cream. In addition to fruit, many smoothies include crushed ice, frozen fruit and honey. They have a milkshake-like consistency that is thicker than slush drinks. These thick, cold blender beverages are tasty, refreshing and, if made with the right ingredients, nutritious. Smoothies are easy to concoct with ingredients you have in your pantry and can be a great choice for a snack or mini-meal.
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LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | January 8, 2013
It's winter. Time to try new ideas for getting vegetables in your children. I know what parents go through to get kids to eat vegetables. I was a kid once, and I hated finding vegetables I didn't like hidden in my food. I love pizza, but if a pizza had onions visible on it, I didn't eat it. If beef stew had green beans or peas in it, I plucked them out. Mushrooms in my soup? No way. Now I'm older and my tastes have matured, and I find many vegetables delicious. Still, there are times when I don't have time to chop veggies for a big salad or cook up a soup or stew.
NEWS
Lynn Little | August 7, 2012
Cool, refreshing and quick, a smoothie is great as a healthful snack, a light meal or dessert. Let your imagination be your guide to this easy-to-make, nearly foolproof, cold, blended beverage. The basic ingredients are a small amount (about 1/2 cup) of liquid plus fruit, and other ingredients you could add, such as nuts, tofu or soft cheeses. Use washed fresh or frozen fruit. The benefit of using frozen fruit in place of some of the ice to thicken your beverage is that it adds more nutrients, but it also bumps up the calories.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2012
Name of business: Shepherd's Whey Creamery Owners: Suzanne and Toby Behrmann Address: 825 Jenny Wren Drive, Martinsburg, W.Va. Opening date: May 25, 2012 Products and services: Goat milk cheese including chevre, a soft, spreadable traditional goat cheese flavored with pineapple, as well as various herbs and spices, including basil, caraway, black pepper and seasoned salt; queso fresco, a firm, pressed cheese offered plain...
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | July 13, 2012
The summer fun continues with this delicious summer creation, blending two summer squash to bring out the best in both. The secret to this dish? Make sure your cumin and curry powder are fresh. Anything older than six months needs to be tossed out. For some flavor variations, try adding honey or using it to drizzle over the soup before serving. Or try a fruit-flavored yogurt such as peach or honey vanilla to really showcase the soup. This is a great make-ahead soup that you can store in the fridge for a delicious creamy pick-me-up the next day. Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
NEWS
Melissa Tewes and Joe Fleischman | Your Health Matters | September 16, 2011
Special to The Herald-Mail By definition, an appetizer is a small dish of food or a drink taken before a meal to stimulate one's appetite. Depending upon your choice, appetizers can make or break your nutrition goals to consume a healthier diet. Appetizers can be eaten as the traditional definition describes but also can be used to avoid overeating, curve your appetite or as a wise choice for an entree.   If you choose to eat an appetizer as a precursor to your meal, be careful not to choose typical high-calorie, high-fat, high-sodium appetizers that many restaurants offer.
NEWS
Lynn Little | September 13, 2011
How many times have you heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day? It's because eating breakfast is linked to better performance, and more. Breakfast fuels the body with nutrients. Eating breakfast provides your child higher intakes of vitamins A and C, riboflavin, calcium, zinc and iron. Your child might not make up the nutrients missed at breakfast. In addition, breakfast provides food energy for an active morning.   Breakfast helps get your child ready to learn.
LIFESTYLE
June 28, 2011
I have worked as the City of Hagerstown's market coordinator for more than two years. I learned a number of things from my vendors, including how to be a better cook, thanks in part to the products they offer. In my free time, I spend time with my family, reading anything on Ireland and history and watching old movies. I gathered fruit for this salad from vendors at the Market Faire and the historic City Farmers' Market. I bought fruit from Bingaman's Greenhouse, Litton's Berries & Produce, Hickory Haven Farm and The Farmer's Daughter; yogurt from Dave Elliott of Blue Mountain Farm; and cream cheese pound cake from R&B Baked Goods & More.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
Yogurt and spice marinated chicken with grapefruit relish 1/4 cup nonfat plain yogurt 3 tablespoons lime juice, divided 2 teaspoons olive oil 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon salt, divided 1 pound thinly sliced boneless, skinless chicken breast cutlets 2 cups jarred grapefruit sections, drained 1 small red onion, minced (about 3/4 cup) 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon honey 1/2 to 1 jalapeo pepper, seeded and finely chopped, to taste Ground black pepper, to taste In a medium bowl, whisk together the yogurt, 2 tablespoons of the lime juice, olive oil, garlic, cumin, paprika and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | September 24, 2008
Some foods stand out as superstars with many nutrients to enhance health and prevent disease. Here are some smart food choices to make every day. o Spinach. This dark green veggie is full of nutrients and is one of the few foods rich in vitamin K, which helps with blood clotting. It also contains vitamin A for healthy skin and vision, folate for red blood cell formation and iron for oxygen transport within the body. Spinach also contains calcium, potassium (which can help lower blood pressure)
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