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By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | September 11, 2011
Even the timing of the Independent Fire Co.'s 9/11 memorial service Sunday morning was on target. The ceremony, in front of the fire hall's side entrance before an audience of nearly 100, began at 9:59 a.m., the exact time that the World Trade Center's South Tower came crashing down from the impact of United Airlines' Flight 175. It ended at 10:28 a.m., when the North Tower collapsed, the victim of American Airlines' Flight 11. Henry Christie,...
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NEWS
Stuart Samuels | September 10, 2011
Most every American who is old enough to remember can instantly recall what they were doing on Sept. 11, 2001. The video images from the events of that day are indelibly burned into our consciousness like a nightmare on a continuous loop. As for me, I was on vacation while working for another Maryland newspaper. Instead of being involved in shaping coverage and assigning local stories as the media tried to understand the impact of the terrorist attacks, I stood transfixed like millions of Americans, mouth slightly agape, staring at the television images that went from tragic to horrific.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2011
Katie Monteleone was in third grade when the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York. "I remember sitting in class and our teacher telling us that something had happened. They weren't sure if they could tell us what had happened," said Monteleone, 19. "I just remember panic and our teachers not knowing what to do. It was just a very sad day. " The Penn State Mont Alto freshman and other classmates decided to remember Sept. 11 with a day of community service Saturday.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2011
Boonsboro High School graduate Kevin Hurlbrink was training at Fort Gordon, Ga., when hijacked jetliners tore into the Pentagon and World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. His battalion commander told his unit that America was under attack. At first, they believed the announcement was some kind of "crazy training. " "Initially, we had thought he was joking or blindsiding us with some kind of crazy training," Hurlbrink recently wrote in an email. "He went on to explain that two planes had struck the towers of the World Trade Center.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | September 8, 2011
The Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks showed our vulnerability as a nation and thrust religious questions into headlines and dinner-table conversations that had given very few Americans pause prior to that day, according to Don Stevenson, a retired pastor of Christ's Reformed Church in Hagerstown. "When we were bombed, it brought America to its knees," said Stevenson, who is adjunct professor of philosophy, ethics and religion at Hagerstown Community College. "We as a nation, we were kicked in the stomach, so to speak; we were at ground zero in our psyche.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | September 7, 2011
Kaplan University in Hagerstown now has something that school President W. Christopher Motz said was conspicuously absent 10 years ago - a flagpole with the Stars and Stripes flying. The campus Wednesday held a ceremony that acknowledged the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and remembered victims and heroes of that day, including first responders. The flagpole was dedicated in memory of Lance Cpl. Steven Szwydek of Fulton County, Pa., a U.S. Marine killed while serving in Iraq in 2005.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2011
Gordon and Rosie McLucas met in April 1946 at a Waynesboro, Pa., skating rink. Gordon - who goes by his middle name, rather than his first name, William - went there with a friend. Rosie also went with a friend. Gordon married Rosie. Their friends from that night also got married. The McLucases are about to hit a milestone in their marriage: Their 65th anniversary is on Sept. 11. Rosie's 86th birthday is on the same day. The anniversary and birthday were noted on the front page of The Daily Mail on Sept.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2011
When hijacked planes tore into the heart of America 10 years ago, life changed. Fear, war, terror alerts and increased airport security became part of the daily lexicon. The immediate shift in daily life is shown in the pages of The Daily Mail, the afternoon newspaper - since merged into The Herald-Mail - that gave some Hagerstown residents their first printed account of the terrorist attacks. The front page of the Sept. 11, 2001, edition screamed "Terror hits U.S. " and showed a picture of flames after a second plane hit the twin towers.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | September 4, 2011
Ken Snyder is more cautious around crowds and is prone to a “defensive posture.” Retired minister Torben Aarsand has noticed that “fear is just under the surface of our minds,” and it makes itself known in unrelated events - such as the recent earthquake. Suzanne Hayes said one of the most remarkable experiences among baby boomers like herself was feeling that they had the world “on a string.” Now, Hayes said, the next generation knows that's not the case for them.
NEWS
Jake Womer | September 3, 2011
There are a string of images that I never want to see again. I don't know how many times I've seen video of the second plane flying into the Twin Towers on Sept. 11, 2001. Whatever the final tally, that's enough. I was far from danger that day and glued to a television screen like so many other Americans. Video of the plane's impact and of the towers collapsing seemed to be played on a loop. And now it's seared into my brain. I don't need to be reminded of it. Many Americans share that sentiment.
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