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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 10, 2010
With reverence, humility and gratitude, local officials on Friday remembered the horror of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the brave attempts by emergency crews to save lives. Hagerstown Mayor Robert E. Bruchey II, who spoke at the event, said he was getting ready to go to work when he saw news coverage of the first crash at the World Trade Center and figured it was a pilot's terrible mistake. When a second plane crashed, Bruchey said, he knew Americans' lives would change forever.
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NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | September 12, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com MERCERSBURG, Pa. - Caroline Miller walked up to the little monument carrying 3-year-old Nick on one arm and a bouquet of red roses and white mums on the other. She put the flowers on the base of a monument dedicated to the victims of the World Trade Center, Pentagon and Flight 93 who died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. She didn't know about Wednesday's dedication ceremony until she got there. "I knew the monument was here and I decided to put flowers on it. When I think of all those people ... it was such a sad day for the country," she said.
NEWS
BY KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2013
Bells tolled and bugles sounded at Hagerstown City Park Tuesday evening as the community paused to remember emergency personnel and those in the armed forces who lost their lives in the line of duty. Some stopped to reminisce in front of the 9/11 memorial at the park about the day 12 years ago, a beautiful late summer day not unlike Tuesday, when two planes flew into the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon was attacked, and passengers fought with hijackers as they brought down an airliner near Shanksville, Pa. Remembrance in the Park was a tribute to lost lives, at war and at home, to terrorist attacks and other emergencies.
NEWS
by SARAH JOHNSTON | May 9, 2006
I saw "United 93" the weekend it opened. As the theater lights dimmed, a nervous jitter ran through the crowd. The audience braced for the painful memories that "United 93" would unearth, memories that many Americans have tried to forget since Sept. 11. Scanning the apprehensive faces, I wondered what the movie would mean to each moviegoer. I knew what it would mean to me. I have lived in Hagerstown for a year and a half. My family moved here from New Jersey, but, having lived 18 miles outside of Manhattan, I associate myself with New York City more than anywhere else.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | September 12, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - About 60 people attended a public memorial service Thursday at Letterkenny Chapel for the more than 3,000 victims who died during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, a day one speaker said Americans would remember for the rest of their lives. The service was sponsored by the United Churches of the Chambersburg Area. The country remembers the thousands who died that day at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and on Flight 93 in the Pennsylvania countryside, said the Rev. William H. Harter, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Falling Spring.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2011
Gordon and Rosie McLucas met in April 1946 at a Waynesboro, Pa., skating rink. Gordon - who goes by his middle name, rather than his first name, William - went there with a friend. Rosie also went with a friend. Gordon married Rosie. Their friends from that night also got married. The McLucases are about to hit a milestone in their marriage: Their 65th anniversary is on Sept. 11. Rosie's 86th birthday is on the same day. The anniversary and birthday were noted on the front page of The Daily Mail on Sept.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 5, 2011
A Sept. 11, 2001, memorial planned for Red Run Park in Washington Township, Pa., features not only three large artifacts, but also plaques describing the terrorist attacks of the day. A committee overseeing the memorial's development in Rouzerville, Pa., debuted a scale model of their plans Monday during a Washington Township Supervisors meeting. The township already obtained a steel beam from the fallen World Trade Center towers in New York City. Negotiations are under way to acquire part of a limestone wall where a terrorist-controlled airplane hit the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., as well as a rock from the crash site in Shanksville, Pa. Those three items would be the main focus of a memorial contained in a pentagon-shaped pavilion about 30 feet in diameter and 18 1/2 feet high.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | September 11, 2005
erinc@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and the heroism of rescue workers on that day, local firefighters said they got handshakes and even a few hugs from grateful residents. For a year or two, some said, they noticed more people thanking them for the work they do. Now, four years after terrorists in hijacked airliners attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, some firefighters say that's not the case anymore.
NEWS
August 17, 2006
Maryland Hagerstown Cinema 10 Leitersburg Pike 301-797-6454 Accepted - Fri. - 12:15, 2:20, 4:25, 6:30, 8:35 p.m.; Sat. - 11:15 a.m., 1:20, 3:25, 5:30, 7:35, 9:40 p.m.; Sun. - 2:50, 4:55, 7, 9:05 p.m. Barnyard - Fri. - 12:10, 2:10, 4:10 p.m.; Sat. - 11:10 a.m., 1:10, 3:10, 5:10 p.m.; Sun. - 2, 4, 6 p.m. The Decent - Fri. - 7:45, 10 p.m.; Sat. - 6:45, 9 p.m.; Sun. - 7:30, 9:40 p.m. ...
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 10, 2006
HAGERSTOWN- A firefighter - a brother - died on a cataclysmic call at the World Trade Center. An investment banker - a brother and a son - called home just after a plane hit his tower. Employees at a Hagerstown office heard a phone message from a New York City colleague and wondered if she survived. At the Pentagon, a worker ducked under a desk when a plane hit the building. An Air Force officer evacuated after being told that a bomb had gone off, but realized the truth was more terrible.
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