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World Trade Center

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NEWS
December 14, 2011
Three steel artifacts recovered from the World Trade Center will be on display Thursday and Saturday at the Butcher Shoppe, 410 Stouffer Ave., Chambersburg.   Members of the Letterkenny Chapel 9/11 Franklin County Memorial Committee will be on hand to provide information about the permanent memorial, which will be on the grounds adjacent to the historic Letterkenny Chapel. A wide range of naming opportunities are available for sponsorship of flags, flag poles, benches, trees and pavers that will be placed at the memorial site.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | September 22, 2011
A piece of the World Trade Center rubble left after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, made its way to the Waynesboro area this week in a journey two men say changed them forever. "We had no idea what we were getting into when we went up there (to New York City), just thinking we were going to get an I-beam," Gary Shatzer said. "We brought history to the township," Geoff Rickett said. Shatzer and Rickett are Washington Township, Pa., municipal employees who volunteered to pick up the steel Wednesday.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH and KATE S. ALEXANDER | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com and kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | May 12, 2011
Washington County Emergency Services officials drove to New York City on Thursday to pick up a 6-foot steel beam that had been part of the World Trade Center buildings when terrorists attacked on Sept. 11, 2001. The beam will be unveiled on Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. during a public ceremony at the Emergency Services Remembrance Garden in Hagerstown's City Park. Verna Brown, emergency management coordinator for Washington County, said members of the Washington County Citizen Corps Committee began working two years ago to get an artifact from ground zero of the attack site.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2012
Michelle Ross said she took her three young children to see a piece of history at City Park on Monday. Although Ross' twin daughters, Alivia and Lauren, are only 3, and her son, George, is just a toddler, she said she wanted them to see the Sept. 11 memorial to teach them early on about the importance of that fateful day. “Girls, do you see this?” Ross asked her daughters. “This came all the way from New York.” “It's perfect,” Alivia said. The large girder that once was part of the World Trade Center in New York City is now a mangled piece of steel.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | June 10, 2002
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Nine months after the attacks on the World Trade Center shocked the nation, a traveling memorial for those who died will stop in Chambersburg this week. The World Trade Center Traveling Memorial is sponsored by the Port Authority Police of New York and New Jersey and honors all uniformed services personnel and civilians who died in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The memorial will be set up at the Franklin Fire Co., 158 W. King St., Chambersburg, from 5 to 9 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
by | September 8, 2003
Monday, Sept. 8 8 p.m. on PBS "American Experience" Filmmaker Ric Burns concludes his documentary series about New York with a look at how the World Trade Center was designed and built, became a sometimes-controversial landmark and was destroyed in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. 9 p.m. on Lifetime "Sex and the Single Mom" Gail O'Grady stars in this new movie as a divorced mother whose affair with a married doctor (Grant Show)
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | September 12, 2008
RANSON, W.Va. -- Frank McCluskey on Thursday clued in about 125 people on what it was like to be a firefighter in New York City the day of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. McCluskey, provost and executive vice president of American Public University in Charles Town, was a volunteer fire chief in suburban New York who responded to the World Trade Center. At a 9/11 remembrance at Independent Fire Co. along Fairfax Boulevard, McCluskey recalled how emergency radio frequencies were jammed and how cell phone networks were overwhelmed.
NEWS
by REBECCA HULL | August 15, 2006
REVIEW The true spirit of heroism that was demonstrated on Sept. 11 is captured in the newly released film "World Trade Center. " The movie shows the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center from the points of view of two Port Authority police officers - John McLoughlin, played by Nicolas Cage and Will Jimeno, played by Michael Pena. In "World Trade Center," John and Will are trapped in rubble after one of the towers collapses. They get buried deeper and deeper and keep each other alive by talking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
BY KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2013
Bells tolled and bugles sounded at Hagerstown City Park Tuesday evening as the community paused to remember emergency personnel and those in the armed forces who lost their lives in the line of duty. Some stopped to reminisce in front of the 9/11 memorial at the park about the day 12 years ago, a beautiful late summer day not unlike Tuesday, when two planes flew into the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon was attacked, and passengers fought with hijackers as they brought down an airliner near Shanksville, Pa. Remembrance in the Park was a tribute to lost lives, at war and at home, to terrorist attacks and other emergencies.
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OPINION
By LLOYD WATERS | September 8, 2013
It was 8:45 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, and I was at work at Maryland Correctional Institution south of Hagerstown. Someone said that an airplane had flown into the World Trade Center. I went to an adjacent office, turned on a TV and watched in horror as the blue skies over New York City turned to black, gray and then white smoke. A plane had crashed into the 80th floor of the North Tower of the World Trade Center. The site became even more horrific as a second plane flew into the 60th floor of the South Tower.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | August 16, 2013
When he stopped at Premium Outlets for lunch on Friday, Richard Pinnavaia - who was in the South Tower of the World Trade Center when it was hit in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks - had his World Trade Center identification card with him, as well as a picture of a friend who died in the attacks. “I wear it on the ride every year,” said Pinnavaia, who was participating in the annual America's 9/11 motorcycle ride. “It's a symbolic gesture on my part so that people know that not only was I there, but I also know someone who passed away.” Pinnavaia, 67, said he worked on the 35th floor and got out of the tower about half an hour before it collapsed.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2012
Michelle Ross said she took her three young children to see a piece of history at City Park on Monday. Although Ross' twin daughters, Alivia and Lauren, are only 3, and her son, George, is just a toddler, she said she wanted them to see the Sept. 11 memorial to teach them early on about the importance of that fateful day. “Girls, do you see this?” Ross asked her daughters. “This came all the way from New York.” “It's perfect,” Alivia said. The large girder that once was part of the World Trade Center in New York City is now a mangled piece of steel.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
A 30-pound rock from the Flight 93 crash site has arrived in Washington Township, Pa., to be incorporated into a Sept. 11, 2001, memorial. Flight 93, which was hijacked by terrorists, crashed at 9:50 a.m., killing all the passengers and crew members. According to the Associated Press, 2,977 people were killed in the attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and in the crash of United Airlines Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa. A committee of volunteers is working to create a Sept.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | December 15, 2011
As shoppers left the Butcher Shoppe on Stouffer Avenue Thursday, many stopped by the portable display containing steel beams, huge bolts and rubble from the World Trade Center. Eventually, a permanent memorial containing the trade center artifacts will be erected next to Letterkenny Chapel at Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg. The Letterkenny Chapel 9/11 Franklin County Memorial Committee is spearheading the effort. "It was a very sad day," Cheryl Alleman of Fayetteville, Pa., said of the Sept.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 5, 2011
A Sept. 11, 2001, memorial planned for Red Run Park in Washington Township, Pa., features not only three large artifacts, but also plaques describing the terrorist attacks of the day. A committee overseeing the memorial's development in Rouzerville, Pa., debuted a scale model of their plans Monday during a Washington Township Supervisors meeting. The township already obtained a steel beam from the fallen World Trade Center towers in New York City. Negotiations are under way to acquire part of a limestone wall where a terrorist-controlled airplane hit the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., as well as a rock from the crash site in Shanksville, Pa. Those three items would be the main focus of a memorial contained in a pentagon-shaped pavilion about 30 feet in diameter and 18 1/2 feet high.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2011
“The twin towers were a tragic sight. Some people still can't sleep through the night. They remember the towers about to collapse. All you could hear was a bunch of gasps. As the towers were falling, thousands were dying. You could see everyone crying. Eventually the towers were nothing but air. No one spoke but everyone stared. Few survivors were found at the scene and that's something everyone can agree. We can't forget the heroes of Flight 93. They sacrificed their lives as we all see. The terrorists did prove something that day. We are Americans and proud to be the U.S.A.” - Kalynn Boos, 11   Even though 11-year-old Kalynn Boos wasn't old enough to remember the terrorist attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | September 22, 2011
A piece of the World Trade Center rubble left after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, made its way to the Waynesboro area this week in a journey two men say changed them forever. "We had no idea what we were getting into when we went up there (to New York City), just thinking we were going to get an I-beam," Gary Shatzer said. "We brought history to the township," Geoff Rickett said. Shatzer and Rickett are Washington Township, Pa., municipal employees who volunteered to pick up the steel Wednesday.
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