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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 17, 2012
A teachers strike in the Waynesboro Area School District could affect the opening days of the community's public Northside Pool, borough officials said this week. Waynesboro Area Education Association members voted last week to authorize a strike. However, union leaders have not announced any dates for a possible work stoppage. “The community would know 48 hours before a strike would occur. ... The law requires 48-hour notice,” said Mike Engle, president of the teachers union.
NEWS
BY AL DITZEL | May 28, 2002
Growing up, baseball became my favorite sport - more than football or basketball or any other. Maybe it was because it was the only game I enjoyed in which I participated that I had any success or maybe it's because I understood it so. I can remember the first time I saw Brooks Robinson field a bunt bare-handed and throw out a runner at first or when Mark Belanger came straight over the top with a throw from the shortstop's hole. Those are my early memories of the major league game.
NEWS
By DON AINES | July 3, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. -- Chambersburg Hospital and the union representing about 1,400 of its employees have about two weeks to reach an agreement on a new contract and avoid a strike. Eighty-three percent of the union members voted Tuesday to send notice of a potential five-day strike to the hospital, according to a statement released by Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Healthcare Pennsylvania. The strike could begin July 17 unless an agreement is reached, according to the statement.
NEWS
March 13, 2007
Editor's note: The following is a letter from Berkeley County Schools Superintendent Manny Arvon to employees of the school district. March 12, 2007 Dear Berkeley County Schools' Employee, The 2007 West Virginia legislative session concluded with some progress made in assisting the Eastern Panhandle as we experience growth and struggle to make salaries more competitive with the surrounding states. The Berkeley County Board of Education and your senior administrative staff have been striving to provide benefits such as the Housing Allowance and the Sick Leave Bonus.
NEWS
from Staff reports | September 14, 2003
WILLIAMSPORT - A special examiner for the Maryland labor department has ruled that about 178 workers at Garden State Tanning are entitled to receive jobless benefits for the week they went on strike in June, the workers' lawyer said Saturday. Attorney William L. Proctor Jr. said the hearing examiner who heard the case for the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation's Board of Appeals ruled on Friday that there was no stoppage of work during the labor dispute as defined by the state's unemployment insurance law. A work stoppage would have been a prerequisite for denying the unemployment claims.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 15, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Joan Moats said she believes teachers in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia should be paid more, and she was sympathetic to certain teachers' decisions to take part in a walkout Wednesday. "I'm not a teacher, but I travel to Virginia because they pay more," said Moats, a nursing assistant at a health and rehabilitation center in Winchester, Va., for 14 years. With her sons, William, 9, and Brandon, 15, in tow outside the Berkeley County Judicial Center on Wednesday, Moats said she was well aware of the salary disparity between Loudoun County, Va., and Berkeley County.
NEWS
by AL DITZEL | September 3, 2002
When I finally checked the news last Friday, I was shocked to see that the Major League Baseball owners and players' union had reached an agreement. Never had I ever thought they could do so without some sort of work stoppage. I was wrong and I'm glad of it. Still, this past weekend, I felt a little something unusual - I really didn't care to watch any major league baseball. Maybe it was because my resolve was there would not be baseball this past weekend and I made other plans.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 27, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Striking members of United Auto Workers Local 1590 in Martinsburg returned to work the second shift at the General Motors parts distribution center on Wednesday afternoon, the union group's president said. "Everybody was glad to be back at work," Ken Collinson said. "A (prolonged) strike would have crippled both sides. We knew that. " In the next week or so, Collinson said Local 1590 leaders will hold informational meetings about the tentative agreement that was announced by union and GM leaders early Wednesday.
NEWS
by TIM SHEA | August 15, 2002
I can't tell you how excited I am to find out that there may not be a baseball work stoppage after all. Yawn. I find it hard to believe that all of baseball's ills may all of a sudden be solved because of the "immense pressure" the players and owners are under to reach a deal before they anger their "loyal" fans. I, for one, count myself in the category of "we can live with baseball or we can live without baseball. " I hardly think I'm the only person who feels this way. I won't be angry if the players go on strike.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD and DAVE McMILLION | March 14, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Members of West Virginia's largest teachers union in Berkeley and Jefferson counties will take part in an orchestrated walkout that prompted administrators to cancel classes today. "It's something we got to do to get the attention of Charleston to improve the quality of the education of the students," Berkeley County Education Association President James G. Keller said Tuesday after teachers' votes were tallied at a closed-door meeting in Martinsburg High School's auditorium.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 17, 2012
A teachers strike in the Waynesboro Area School District could affect the opening days of the community's public Northside Pool, borough officials said this week. Waynesboro Area Education Association members voted last week to authorize a strike. However, union leaders have not announced any dates for a possible work stoppage. “The community would know 48 hours before a strike would occur. ... The law requires 48-hour notice,” said Mike Engle, president of the teachers union.
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SPORTS
April 27, 2011
On the eve of the NFL draft, Washington Redskins coach Mike Shanahan talked a whole lot more about trading down than he did about trading up. The Redskins have the No. 10 overall choice in the draft that starts today and have lots of holes to fill, making it a believable proposition that Shanahan will want to move down to acquire more picks. Even if he wanted to move up, the coach wouldn’t have much to offer because his team currently doesn¿t have any selections between Rounds 2 and 5. “Obviously it¿s a little bit tougher when you don¿t have multiple picks, especially in the third or fourth round,” Shanahan said Wednesday.
NEWS
By DON AINES | July 3, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. -- Chambersburg Hospital and the union representing about 1,400 of its employees have about two weeks to reach an agreement on a new contract and avoid a strike. Eighty-three percent of the union members voted Tuesday to send notice of a potential five-day strike to the hospital, according to a statement released by Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Healthcare Pennsylvania. The strike could begin July 17 unless an agreement is reached, according to the statement.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 27, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Striking members of United Auto Workers Local 1590 in Martinsburg returned to work the second shift at the General Motors parts distribution center on Wednesday afternoon, the union group's president said. "Everybody was glad to be back at work," Ken Collinson said. "A (prolonged) strike would have crippled both sides. We knew that. " In the next week or so, Collinson said Local 1590 leaders will hold informational meetings about the tentative agreement that was announced by union and GM leaders early Wednesday.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 15, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Joan Moats said she believes teachers in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia should be paid more, and she was sympathetic to certain teachers' decisions to take part in a walkout Wednesday. "I'm not a teacher, but I travel to Virginia because they pay more," said Moats, a nursing assistant at a health and rehabilitation center in Winchester, Va., for 14 years. With her sons, William, 9, and Brandon, 15, in tow outside the Berkeley County Judicial Center on Wednesday, Moats said she was well aware of the salary disparity between Loudoun County, Va., and Berkeley County.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD and DAVE McMILLION | March 14, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Members of West Virginia's largest teachers union in Berkeley and Jefferson counties will take part in an orchestrated walkout that prompted administrators to cancel classes today. "It's something we got to do to get the attention of Charleston to improve the quality of the education of the students," Berkeley County Education Association President James G. Keller said Tuesday after teachers' votes were tallied at a closed-door meeting in Martinsburg High School's auditorium.
NEWS
March 13, 2007
Editor's note: The following is a letter from Berkeley County Schools Superintendent Manny Arvon to employees of the school district. March 12, 2007 Dear Berkeley County Schools' Employee, The 2007 West Virginia legislative session concluded with some progress made in assisting the Eastern Panhandle as we experience growth and struggle to make salaries more competitive with the surrounding states. The Berkeley County Board of Education and your senior administrative staff have been striving to provide benefits such as the Housing Allowance and the Sick Leave Bonus.
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 6, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - After a one-day strike Monday, the 629 members of the Lincoln Intermediate Unit Education Association were to return to work this morning at the Franklin Learning Center and other schools in the region, but the issues that prompted the work stoppage remain unresolved. There were no classes for the approximately 175 school children and 45 preschoolers at the learning center Monday, said Jane Adams-Delp, the center's supervisor of special education. Twenty-nine Lincoln Intermediate Unit staff members work at the center, she said, serving students with various disabilities from five school districts in the county.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER and GREGORY T. SIMMONS | August 28, 2004
tammyb@herald-mail.com gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - He's not facing election again until 2006, but Gov. Robert Ehrlich was hard on the campaign trail Friday anyway, carrying a message of "aggressive activism" and attempting to persuade local groups that it's time to be more vocal with their state representatives about their concerns. During a luncheon with the Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce, Ehrlich bluntly told the business community that business interests in Maryland have "not been a feared agent" in Annapolis.
NEWS
from Staff reports | September 14, 2003
WILLIAMSPORT - A special examiner for the Maryland labor department has ruled that about 178 workers at Garden State Tanning are entitled to receive jobless benefits for the week they went on strike in June, the workers' lawyer said Saturday. Attorney William L. Proctor Jr. said the hearing examiner who heard the case for the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation's Board of Appeals ruled on Friday that there was no stoppage of work during the labor dispute as defined by the state's unemployment insurance law. A work stoppage would have been a prerequisite for denying the unemployment claims.
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