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Willie Mays

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NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | August 10, 2004
Marco Alvarez was the only person at a reception in Willie Mays' honor Monday in the Clarion's Grand Ballroom who was dressed in a tuxedo for the occasion. That's because Alvarez, 45, of Hagerstown, was Mays' limousine driver for the day. "He's definitely the most important person I've ever driven," he said. Alvarez said he saw Mays for only about five minutes Monday afternoon but hoped to talk to him more today during their drive to the airport. Because of the special occasion, Alvarez brought his son, Marco Alvarez II, 3, along to see the baseball legend.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | July 11, 2004
Forty-eight years ago in Atlanta, Ga., Branch Rickey began his speech to the One Hundred Percent Wrong Club banquet with the warning "Ladies and gentlemen, my plane doesn't leave until tomorrow at 10:35 a.m. and I haven't a thing to do between now and then but to talk - and I feel like talking. " Indeed, the Brooklyn Dodgers general manager had a lot to say, specifically about how he was able usher the first black baseball player into the Major Leagues after a century of racial exclusion.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | August 15, 2004
The folks at the Hall of Fame may wish to revise Willie Mays' career total of 660 home runs. After his performance in Hagerstown this week, his total should read 661. This event, bringing the Giants' superstar outfielder back to the town where he made his professional debut to scattered, racially based catcalls, certainly had the potential for a mere publicity stunt. Get in, get the check from a town of bitter memories and get out. Not even close. It's safe to say that everyone in the ballroom of the Clarion Hotel Monday evening already had tremendous respect for Willie Mays the center fielder.
NEWS
April 5, 2005
The Hagerstown City Council is considering renaming a portion of Memorial Boulevard that runs alongside Municipal Stadium for baseball great Willie Mays, who played his first professional game here in the 1950s.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | August 10, 2004
April and Elizabeth Dantzler took their mother, Annie Dantzler, to Monday's Hagerstown Suns game as a late birthday gift. There, Willie Mays spoke and threw out the first pitch. The daughters tricked their mother, letting her think they were attending some type of post-work function. "I didn't know I'd be here," Annie Dantzler, 60, said, pointing out that her attire was more fitting for dinner or a banquet than for a night at the ballpark. Annie Dantzler said that she wasn't a big baseball fan but was a big fan of Willie Mays when she was a young woman.
NEWS
April 28, 2005
Finally, Hagerstown's Mayor and Council have gotten it right, saying on Tuesday that they want to rename Municipal Stadium in honor of baseball great Willie Mays. Anyone planning to oppose this should consider that doing so will only hurt Hagerstown, by reinforcing the image some have of the city as mean and intolerant. Why would anyone oppose the name change at this point? Surely not because of a sentimental attachment to the name "Municipal Stadium. " To those who say that Willie Mays never did anything for Hagerstown, we say this: He began his professional baseball career here in 1950.
NEWS
May 12, 2005
Mays set a good example To the editor: When I came to understand that Willie Mays began his professional baseball career in Hagerstown - my own hometown - I thought it was pretty cool. It seemed odd to me that Hagerstown had never capitalized upon this fact until I learned that Mays wasn't well received by the populace. I guess the shame factor had a lot to do with this, and so when Mays finally returned to Hagerstown, Mayor William Breichner, in his desire to "set things right" made a rash, spur-of-the-moment promise without so much as a feasibility check.
NEWS
by BOB PARASILITI | August 8, 2004
bobp@herald-mail.com Cynthia Shepard is a Willie Mays fan, mostly because she is a Cloyde "Bud" Snively fan. Over the years, Shepard has spent her days looking at a picture of Mays - seated at a table with Snively, her stepfather - which has been placed prominently in her Jonathan Street-area home. The 1950 photo at the old Brown's Tavern has that much special meaning. In its own unassuming way, the treasured heirloom is a missing piece of baseball history, dating to when Mays played his first game for the New York Giants organization with the Trenton Giants, a minor league team playing against the Hagerstown Braves at Municipal Stadium.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | August 8, 2004
andrews@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Willie Mays was a central figure in a raging baseball question of the 1950s: Which New York player shone the brightest in center field - Willie, Mickey or the Duke? Who knows? We'll never agree. Hagerstown, though, can be certain that it always will be an answer in Mays' Hall of Fame career. It's the city where Mays played his first professional game for the New York Giants organization. There are other questions to examine: What happened when Mays debuted here?
NEWS
by MARK KELLER | May 8, 2005
It's scary when I find myself in agreement with the masses in Hagerstown - well, at least the masses that phone Mail Call on a regular basis. But the more I think about the whole Willie Mays road/stadium renaming fiasco, I have to say I think the Mail Callers are right: There's no need to name anything in Hagerstown after Mays. Mays was treated badly in Hagerstown in the 1950s. The city offered its apologies to Mays when it invited him back last year, and Mays graciously accepted.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 18, 2013
What's the next plan after the Suns are gone? To the editor: Looks like another big one got away and is headed elsewhere to spawn. Yes, I am talking about the Suns. I wasn't a big fan of a new stadium downtown, but I did think that a new stadium was needed in the area and could be financed either entirely with private funds or some minor participation by the state, county or city. However, that point looks to be moot now. Thank you Hagerstown City Council.
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NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | July 18, 2005
HAGERSTOWN gregs@herald-mail.com Alex Angliss took one look inside the box and hooted with glee. He'd just received a bobblehead doll to add to his collection, and its likeness was of baseball great Willie Mays. Even though Alex, 9, of Greencastle, Pa., shook his head when asked if he knew who Mays was, he only needed one word to describe his new prize. "Saaaa-weet!" There were 1,000 dolls available Sunday at the Hagerstown Suns' game, and the line that formed as the gate opened was long.
NEWS
by MARK KELLER | May 8, 2005
It's scary when I find myself in agreement with the masses in Hagerstown - well, at least the masses that phone Mail Call on a regular basis. But the more I think about the whole Willie Mays road/stadium renaming fiasco, I have to say I think the Mail Callers are right: There's no need to name anything in Hagerstown after Mays. Mays was treated badly in Hagerstown in the 1950s. The city offered its apologies to Mays when it invited him back last year, and Mays graciously accepted.
NEWS
April 28, 2005
Finally, Hagerstown's Mayor and Council have gotten it right, saying on Tuesday that they want to rename Municipal Stadium in honor of baseball great Willie Mays. Anyone planning to oppose this should consider that doing so will only hurt Hagerstown, by reinforcing the image some have of the city as mean and intolerant. Why would anyone oppose the name change at this point? Surely not because of a sentimental attachment to the name "Municipal Stadium. " To those who say that Willie Mays never did anything for Hagerstown, we say this: He began his professional baseball career here in 1950.
NEWS
April 26, 2005
Say it isn't so. Tell us that an effort to honor baseball great Willie Mays didn't turn into a fiasco that has hurt Hagerstown's image, not to mention the feelings of the "Say Hey Kid. " Unfortunately, that is just what has happened. The saddest thing is that need not have happened, if the mayor and council had acted quickly when opposition to their first plan surfaced. Grant them their good intentions, however. The council was trying to atone for what happened when Mays played his first professional baseball game in Hagerstown in 1950.
NEWS
April 5, 2005
The Hagerstown City Council is considering renaming a portion of Memorial Boulevard that runs alongside Municipal Stadium for baseball great Willie Mays, who played his first professional game here in the 1950s.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | August 15, 2004
The folks at the Hall of Fame may wish to revise Willie Mays' career total of 660 home runs. After his performance in Hagerstown this week, his total should read 661. This event, bringing the Giants' superstar outfielder back to the town where he made his professional debut to scattered, racially based catcalls, certainly had the potential for a mere publicity stunt. Get in, get the check from a town of bitter memories and get out. Not even close. It's safe to say that everyone in the ballroom of the Clarion Hotel Monday evening already had tremendous respect for Willie Mays the center fielder.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | August 10, 2004
April and Elizabeth Dantzler took their mother, Annie Dantzler, to Monday's Hagerstown Suns game as a late birthday gift. There, Willie Mays spoke and threw out the first pitch. The daughters tricked their mother, letting her think they were attending some type of post-work function. "I didn't know I'd be here," Annie Dantzler, 60, said, pointing out that her attire was more fitting for dinner or a banquet than for a night at the ballpark. Annie Dantzler said that she wasn't a big baseball fan but was a big fan of Willie Mays when she was a young woman.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | August 10, 2004
Marco Alvarez was the only person at a reception in Willie Mays' honor Monday in the Clarion's Grand Ballroom who was dressed in a tuxedo for the occasion. That's because Alvarez, 45, of Hagerstown, was Mays' limousine driver for the day. "He's definitely the most important person I've ever driven," he said. Alvarez said he saw Mays for only about five minutes Monday afternoon but hoped to talk to him more today during their drive to the airport. Because of the special occasion, Alvarez brought his son, Marco Alvarez II, 3, along to see the baseball legend.
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