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Wildlife Habitat

NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | April 8, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Antietam Creek wraps around Waynesboro in two branches, east and west, that meet south of the borough at Pa. 316 near the Maryland state line. From there the creek runs into the Potomac River and eventually the Chesapeake Bay. In large terms, it's part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Closer to home it's the Antietam Creek Watershed, and that's what a new citizens group being organized by a Waynesboro physician hopes to protect. The organizers met last week for the first time.
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NEWS
March 10, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Brian Brake is a pheasant hunter. He has a gun, shells and Abigail, his trained English setter. What he doesn't have is pheasants. "There used to be 150 to 200 pheasants per square mile in Franklin County 20 years ago," said Brake, 31, of Mercersburg, Pa. "Today there are about four birds per acre and all of them are stocked. There aren't any wild birds left here. " Brake is habitat chairman for the 82-member Franklin County chapter of Pheasants Forever.
NEWS
By ROBERT KESSLER | November 8, 2008
Now is a good time of the year for property owners to look closely at their trees. This includes the street trees along the property. With the leaves off most of the trees, you can inspect your trees for structural damage that might have occurred during the past year and not have been visible during the spring and summer. Under Pennsylvania law, it is a homeowners' duty to exercise care, good judgment, caution and foresight by inspecting trees regularly and recognizing situations that might cause trees or tree branches to break or fall.
NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | May 24, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Ben Thomas and Nate Bacon stood on a knoll Thursday afternoon and watched heavy equipment moving dirt in a field a hundred yards away. What they saw was the construction of a 300-by-360-foot multi-purpose playing field. "They're going to seed it next week, but it won't be ready for play until next year," said Thomas, an Antrim Township administrator. Thomas and Bacon, chairman of the Antrim Township Parks Committee, were seeing the vision of a 136-acre community park becoming a reality.
NEWS
April 22, 2001
Earth Day brings out kites, cars By STACEY DANZUSO / Staff Writer, Chambersburg WAYNESBORO, Pa. - From preservation groups to electric cars and farming co-ops, every Earth-friendly idea imaginable was represented at Renfrew Institute's annual Earth Celebration Day Sunday. The converging of "green" groups and practices is an annual event at Renfrew Park in Waynesboro, and routinely draws hundreds of visitors interested in learning how to protect the environment, said Melodie Anderson-Smith, director of Renfrew Institute for Cultural and Environmental Studies.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS and DAVE McMILLION | June 22, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- As debate continues about a Sharpsburg-area man's right to turn his yard into a "natural grassland habitat," a Washington County attorney has drafted an amendment to the county's weed-control ordinance that would allow such habitats under certain circumstances. The Washington County Commissioners are scheduled to review the proposed amendment during their meeting Tuesday and decide whether to proceed to a public hearing on it. The amendment is intended to "address aesthetic concerns raised by unkempt weeds while protecting the use of grasses for agriculture, pollution and sediment control, game habitat, etc.," according to a written report from Assistant County Attorney Kirk C. Downey.
NEWS
April 13, 1998
Earth Day will be celebrated Friday and Saturday at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Md., featuring displays, contests and programs. Environmental displays will be open to the public at 10 a.m. both days in the field house (building 4020) at Fort Detrick. There will be a dirty sock contest in the field house parking lot at noon Friday. Participants will cover their cars' exhaust pipes with new, clean white socks and let the cars run for 30 seconds. The cleanest sock wins. A creative recycling contest for the most unique use of recyclable materials will be held.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
Stop the bear hunt To the editor: Dear Governor Ehrlich: I am deeply disappointed to learn that Maryland is hosting a black bear hunting season this year after 30 years of peaceful co-existence with them. We humans are the ones taking away black bear habitat through housing and commercial development. And because of this, we humans are the ones increasing the potential for human-black bear conflicts. We have a responsibility to Maryland black bears to address conflicts in a way that promotes compassion and respect for wildlife.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | December 16, 2007
A curious aspect of American life is that we always seem to get two disasters for the price of one. There's the original disaster, then the follow-up disaster that involves the government's response to the original disaster. Maybe there's a thread of nobility here. It's the notion that a government "fix" can ensure that nothing bad will happen to us again ever. And to be sure, there are times that a fix is in order. Trying to advance the cause of socialism, Upton Sinclair instead inspired the government to clean up miserably unsanitary conditions in Chicago's meat-packing plants.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | March 1, 2006
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Facing unprecedented growth in southern Franklin County, Pa., two municipalities that have land available for future development are considering measures to give them better control over the design of developments. Washington Township is on the heels of Antrim Township in the process of meshing "Growing Greener: Conservation by Design" standards into the existing subdivision and zoning ordinances. The move would require developers to set aside large open spaces for either active or passive recreation - without reducing the number of proposed houses.
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