Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsWildlife Habitat
IN THE NEWS

Wildlife Habitat

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 31, 2001
Program turns idle farmland into wildlife habitat By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer MERCERSBURG, Pa. - Pennsylvania was a pheasant hunter's paradise in the 1970s. More than 1 million wild birds were shot across the Keystone State every year. "Pheasant was king," said Brian Brake of Mercersburg. Brake is habitat chairman of the 150-member Cumberland Valley chapter of Pheasants Forever, a sportsmen's lobbying and conservation group whose goal is improving pheasant hunting by improving habitat.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | May 25, 2007
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.VA. - Joseph Gentile has always been interested in nature. While growing up in Michigan, his mother taught him to take care of wildlife. "One of my earliest chores was filling the bird feeders," he said. Since moving to Morgan County in 1990, he has provided a refuge for wildlife on his property, but did not meet all the certified wildlife criteria until this year. Earlier this month, Gentile's property became the 78,606th site chosen by the National Wildlife Federation as an official certified wildlife habitat.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 13, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com SMITHSBURG - The hive of activity that surrounds the pond and new trees outside Smithsburg Middle School is proof that students' development of a wildlife habitat already has started to attract life. Next come the animals, said Chuck Bowler, a volunteer schoolyard habitat consultant for Fairview Outdoor Education Center. "The idea is to make a place for both nature and people," Bowler said as Smithsburg High School ninth-graders spread rocks around the perimeters of a small wildlife garden outside the middle school.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland and the District of Columbia have received $248,600 from the 2002 Farm Bill to restore wildlife habitat through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, a Maryland official said. Landowners interested in applying for funding through WHIP should immediately contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service or Soil Conservation District office in USDA Service Centers, said David Doss, state conservationist. Applications will be ranked to determine which offer the most wildlife habitat benefits.
NEWS
March 6, 2007
A Pennsylvania agency will be trying this summer to increase the awareness and control of noxious and invasive weeds on farm land in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program in the state. The Pennsylvania Resource Conservation & Development aims to help landowners learn to these bad weeds, while emphasizing the beneficial plants that improve wildlife habitat. Controlling noxious weeds is a requirement in the conservation reserve program. Some people have trouble recognizing them in their early and middle stages before they become established and more difficult to control.
NEWS
by JAMES M. WOODARD/Copley News Service | April 11, 2005
Q: Are there any new market niches emerging in real estate? A: Since I started writing this column I thought I'd covered all types of property transactions. Recently, though, I learned about a growing market niche I had never before addressed. Demand for land useful to hunters and fishermen is growing significantly. Here's how an item in Field & Stream Magazine describes it: "Frustrated with crowds on public lands and diminished access to private grounds, outdoorsmen (whose annual economic impact is in excess of $70 billion)
NEWS
April 3, 2007
If you own just one acre or up to 10 acres of land, an upcoming workshop to learn to create and enhance natural areas around your home may be for you. The class is being taught from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, April 19, at the Washington County Extension office at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike south of Hagerstown. Participants will use a new book called, The Woods in Your Backyard: Learning to Create and Enhance Natural Areas Around Your Home, the Extension office said in a press release.
NEWS
May 14, 2009
Conococheague Elementary School will be recognized as a Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education Certified Maryland Green School June 1 at Carroll County Community College. The school is one of 70 in the state receiving this honor, which challenges schools to focus on the environment in everyday operations. During the ceremony, Conococheague Elementary will be presented with a Maryland Green School flag. Conococheague Elementary joins Williamsport Elementary, Western Heights Middle and Claud Kitchens Outdoor School at Fairview as Maryland Green Schools in Washington County.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack reminds landowners and farmers that the opportunity to enroll in the Conservation Reserve Program ends Friday. Producers who want to offer eligible land for the program's general sign-up can enroll at the Farm Service Agency county office where their farm records are maintained. In Washington County, enrollment is at the USDA Service Center 1260 Maryland Ave., Suite 107, in Hagerstown. It is a voluntary program available to agricultural producers to help them use environmentally sensitive land for conservation benefits.
NEWS
By JONATHAN S. KAYS / Extension Specialist in Natural Resources | July 10, 2007
People who buy a large acreage lot with or without trees, along with their home are commonly faced with questions they find hard to answer. If most of the property is cleared, they have to mow acres of grass which is time consuming and costly. What is the best way to transition an area of lawn into a forest? If I plant trees, what trees should I plant and how do I protect them from deer browsing? If the property has a lot of woods, the question may be what should I do to be a good steward of the woods?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2012
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack reminds landowners and farmers that the opportunity to enroll in the Conservation Reserve Program ends Friday. Producers who want to offer eligible land for the program's general sign-up can enroll at the Farm Service Agency county office where their farm records are maintained. In Washington County, enrollment is at the USDA Service Center 1260 Maryland Ave., Suite 107, in Hagerstown. It is a voluntary program available to agricultural producers to help them use environmentally sensitive land for conservation benefits.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 14, 2009
Conococheague Elementary School will be recognized as a Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education Certified Maryland Green School June 1 at Carroll County Community College. The school is one of 70 in the state receiving this honor, which challenges schools to focus on the environment in everyday operations. During the ceremony, Conococheague Elementary will be presented with a Maryland Green School flag. Conococheague Elementary joins Williamsport Elementary, Western Heights Middle and Claud Kitchens Outdoor School at Fairview as Maryland Green Schools in Washington County.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 2, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- How much do 2,568 acres of forest cost in southern Pennsylvania? $12.5 million and a lot of heart. When the property known as Glatfelter Tree Farm No. 1 became available for sale, the pleas of area residents prompted The Conservation Fund to spend the millions needed to purchase it on March 25. Now, several Adams County, Pa., organizations are working together to find the money needed to pay back The Conservation Fund and...
NEWS
By JONATHAN S. KAYS / Extension Specialist in Natural Resources | July 10, 2007
People who buy a large acreage lot with or without trees, along with their home are commonly faced with questions they find hard to answer. If most of the property is cleared, they have to mow acres of grass which is time consuming and costly. What is the best way to transition an area of lawn into a forest? If I plant trees, what trees should I plant and how do I protect them from deer browsing? If the property has a lot of woods, the question may be what should I do to be a good steward of the woods?
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | May 25, 2007
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.VA. - Joseph Gentile has always been interested in nature. While growing up in Michigan, his mother taught him to take care of wildlife. "One of my earliest chores was filling the bird feeders," he said. Since moving to Morgan County in 1990, he has provided a refuge for wildlife on his property, but did not meet all the certified wildlife criteria until this year. Earlier this month, Gentile's property became the 78,606th site chosen by the National Wildlife Federation as an official certified wildlife habitat.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
If you own just one acre or up to 10 acres of land, an upcoming workshop to learn to create and enhance natural areas around your home may be for you. The class is being taught from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, April 19, at the Washington County Extension office at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike south of Hagerstown. Participants will use a new book called, The Woods in Your Backyard: Learning to Create and Enhance Natural Areas Around Your Home, the Extension office said in a press release.
NEWS
March 6, 2007
A Pennsylvania agency will be trying this summer to increase the awareness and control of noxious and invasive weeds on farm land in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program in the state. The Pennsylvania Resource Conservation & Development aims to help landowners learn to these bad weeds, while emphasizing the beneficial plants that improve wildlife habitat. Controlling noxious weeds is a requirement in the conservation reserve program. Some people have trouble recognizing them in their early and middle stages before they become established and more difficult to control.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | June 13, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com SMITHSBURG - The hive of activity that surrounds the pond and new trees outside Smithsburg Middle School is proof that students' development of a wildlife habitat already has started to attract life. Next come the animals, said Chuck Bowler, a volunteer schoolyard habitat consultant for Fairview Outdoor Education Center. "The idea is to make a place for both nature and people," Bowler said as Smithsburg High School ninth-graders spread rocks around the perimeters of a small wildlife garden outside the middle school.
NEWS
by JAMES M. WOODARD/Copley News Service | April 11, 2005
Q: Are there any new market niches emerging in real estate? A: Since I started writing this column I thought I'd covered all types of property transactions. Recently, though, I learned about a growing market niche I had never before addressed. Demand for land useful to hunters and fishermen is growing significantly. Here's how an item in Field & Stream Magazine describes it: "Frustrated with crowds on public lands and diminished access to private grounds, outdoorsmen (whose annual economic impact is in excess of $70 billion)
NEWS
December 21, 2004
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland and the District of Columbia have received $248,600 from the 2002 Farm Bill to restore wildlife habitat through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, a Maryland official said. Landowners interested in applying for funding through WHIP should immediately contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service or Soil Conservation District office in USDA Service Centers, said David Doss, state conservationist. Applications will be ranked to determine which offer the most wildlife habitat benefits.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|