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Whooping Cough

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NEWS
November 21, 1997
Whooping cough By Teri Johnson Staff Writer Some say "hooping," and others say "hwooping. " However you pronounce it - and both are correct - whooping cough is an illness named for its violent coughing spasms. The disease, also known by the scientific name of pertussis, is defined by a whooping noise at the end of a cough, says Dr. Robert Parker, county health officer for Washington County Health Department. "It's not a run-of-the-mill cough," Parker says.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 9, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Health Department officials said they have detected another case of whooping cough in the county. The case was detected within the last week, health officials said in a news release. Health officials said previously that several cases of whooping cough have been detected in Jefferson County. Parents of children were being urged to review their children's' immunization records to make sure their kids are protected from the disease. The cases have occurred in individuals who have not been vaccinated, officials said.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 4, 2006
Adults and teens might be lacking adequate protection from what is often viewed as a childhood illness, pertussis - the highly infectious bacterial disease known as whooping cough, according to health officials. Bordetella pertussis, the bacteria that causes pertussis, attaches to the lungs, producing toxins and inflaming the respiratory tract. The initial stage of the disease is characterized by sneezing and a mild cough, like a common cold. A high-pitched "whooping" cough comes in the latter stage of the disease.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Health officials in Berkeley and Morgan counties in the Eastern Panhandle and Hancock County in the state's Northern Panhandle are investigating outbreaks of whooping cough. Berkeley County Health Officer Diana Gaviria told the Berkeley County Council Thursday morning that they have documented 11 confirmed cases of pertussis among preschool and school-age children since November. "Fortunately, it doesn't seem to be showing any antibiotic resistance, it's easily treated," Gaviria said in an interview after the council meeting.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 18, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Several cases of whooping cough have been detected in Jefferson County, W.Va., in the past week and parents of children are being urged to review their children's immunization records to make sure their kids are protected from the disease, Jefferson County Health Department officials said. The cases have occurred in individuals who have not been vaccinated, officials said. Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, can be a serious disease, especially among children, although deaths are rare, according to a news release from the health department.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 8, 2002
To ensure the health and safety of your child, make sure he or she gets all vaccinations at the right time. Keep a record of your child's immunizations from birth. A schedule of immunizations and at what ages a child should receive them is listed by The Centers for Disease Control on the Web at www.cdc.gov/nip or call 1-800-232-2522. You can also print out a schedule to keep for your own records. Infant Immunization Week is April 14 to 20. Make sure your child's immunizations are up-to-date.
NEWS
July 22, 2012
The West Virginia Department of Education is reminding parents that students entering seventh and 12th grades this fall will need to visit a doctor or health clinic before school begins to update their immunizations. State law and West Virginia Board of Education policy now requires seventh-graders to receive a Tdap vaccine booster, as well as a dose of the meningococcal vaccine. High school seniors also must show proof of a single dose of Tdap and a booster dose of the meningococcal vaccine if the first dose was given before the age of 16, according to a news release from the West Virginia Department of Education.
NEWS
by MEG H. PARTINGTON | July 3, 2006
While health officials worldwide strategize ways to prevent a bird-flu pandemic, the average person might not worry about the threat that childhood diseases pose to their families and society as a whole. Immunizations have eliminated diseases such as polio from the U.S. and made others that once commonly killed children rare. But there is no room for complacency in public health, says Dr. Greg Lyon-Loftus with Mont Alto (Pa.) Family Practice. "We take it for granted that these things aren't going to happen today," Lyon-Loftus says.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 16, 2010
The only thing standing between thousands of yearly disease-related deaths and better health may be an adult's decision to get a shot in the arm. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, thousands of people die from vaccine-preventable deaths "I think influenza is an excellent example," said Dr. Gary L. Euler, an epidemiologist at the CDC. He works at national center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases in the Immunization...
OPINION
June 28, 2012
“If the paper has to check the facts about the story they print, they should do the same for Mail Call. Stories about the county commissioners cutting funds from the nursing program just doesn't seem factual. The BOE and health department should be budgeting that into the budgets each year, since it's state mandated. I think if the county paid for it, then the BOE and health department should have a surplus, instead of spending that extra money. So where is the money, health department leaders?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2012
The West Virginia Department of Education is reminding parents that students entering seventh and 12th grades this fall will need to visit a doctor or health clinic before school begins to update their immunizations. State law and West Virginia Board of Education policy now requires seventh-graders to receive a Tdap vaccine booster, as well as a dose of the meningococcal vaccine. High school seniors also must show proof of a single dose of Tdap and a booster dose of the meningococcal vaccine if the first dose was given before the age of 16, according to a news release from the West Virginia Department of Education.
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OPINION
June 28, 2012
“If the paper has to check the facts about the story they print, they should do the same for Mail Call. Stories about the county commissioners cutting funds from the nursing program just doesn't seem factual. The BOE and health department should be budgeting that into the budgets each year, since it's state mandated. I think if the county paid for it, then the BOE and health department should have a surplus, instead of spending that extra money. So where is the money, health department leaders?
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Health officials in Berkeley and Morgan counties in the Eastern Panhandle and Hancock County in the state's Northern Panhandle are investigating outbreaks of whooping cough. Berkeley County Health Officer Diana Gaviria told the Berkeley County Council Thursday morning that they have documented 11 confirmed cases of pertussis among preschool and school-age children since November. "Fortunately, it doesn't seem to be showing any antibiotic resistance, it's easily treated," Gaviria said in an interview after the council meeting.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 16, 2010
The only thing standing between thousands of yearly disease-related deaths and better health may be an adult's decision to get a shot in the arm. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, thousands of people die from vaccine-preventable deaths "I think influenza is an excellent example," said Dr. Gary L. Euler, an epidemiologist at the CDC. He works at national center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases in the Immunization...
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 4, 2006
Adults and teens might be lacking adequate protection from what is often viewed as a childhood illness, pertussis - the highly infectious bacterial disease known as whooping cough, according to health officials. Bordetella pertussis, the bacteria that causes pertussis, attaches to the lungs, producing toxins and inflaming the respiratory tract. The initial stage of the disease is characterized by sneezing and a mild cough, like a common cold. A high-pitched "whooping" cough comes in the latter stage of the disease.
NEWS
by MEG H. PARTINGTON | July 3, 2006
While health officials worldwide strategize ways to prevent a bird-flu pandemic, the average person might not worry about the threat that childhood diseases pose to their families and society as a whole. Immunizations have eliminated diseases such as polio from the U.S. and made others that once commonly killed children rare. But there is no room for complacency in public health, says Dr. Greg Lyon-Loftus with Mont Alto (Pa.) Family Practice. "We take it for granted that these things aren't going to happen today," Lyon-Loftus says.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 9, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Health Department officials said they have detected another case of whooping cough in the county. The case was detected within the last week, health officials said in a news release. Health officials said previously that several cases of whooping cough have been detected in Jefferson County. Parents of children were being urged to review their children's' immunization records to make sure their kids are protected from the disease. The cases have occurred in individuals who have not been vaccinated, officials said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 18, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Several cases of whooping cough have been detected in Jefferson County, W.Va., in the past week and parents of children are being urged to review their children's immunization records to make sure their kids are protected from the disease, Jefferson County Health Department officials said. The cases have occurred in individuals who have not been vaccinated, officials said. Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, can be a serious disease, especially among children, although deaths are rare, according to a news release from the health department.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | February 24, 2004
Well, at least we know what sells in Western Maryland - sex and deer. National press descended on the region twice last week, once to chronicle the release of a prostitution ring's "Black Book" in Frederick, Md., and also to follow the plight of a deer named Bucky that was taken in by a local family intent on saving its life. The deer made out the better of the two. At least it was more of a feel-good story. Staggering dazed and confused along a highway, it was saved and eventually released into the wild, just barely escaping the hands of the Maryland Department of Natural "Dick Dastardly" Resources, which wanted the animal killed and tested for something called "chronic wasting disease.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 26, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com The little poem that veteran kindergarten teacher Trudy Mackrell-Metz shares with her students every year has nothing to do with reading, writing or arithmetic, but it's one of the most important lessons they'll ever learn: "When you cough or when you sneeze, cover your face with a tissue, please. " Mackrell-Metz said she reinforces the lesson with her kindergarten students at Clear Spring Elementary throughout the year. She keeps a box of tissues in the center of each student work table, reminds the youngsters to use the tissues every time they cough or sneeze, to hold onto used tissues until they throw them away, and then to thoroughly wash their hands with warm water and soap.
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