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White Bread

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NEWS
November 19, 2006
1 loaf (16 ounces) of thinly sliced white bread, crusts removed 8 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 egg yolk 3/4 cup confectioners' sugar 1 cup sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 3/4 cup butter or margarine, melted Flatten bread with a rolling pin. In a medium mixing bowl, combine cream cheese, egg yolk and confectioners' sugar. In another bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon. Spread about 1 tablespoon (or more to taste) of the cream cheese mixture on each slice of bread.
NEWS
By LEIF E. GREEN | September 13, 2008
Seems like summer was only yesterday. Sigh. Now it's time to make school lunches again. So how can we make those lunches a bit "greener" and more nutritious? First of all, take the lunchbox. For your little ones, use a box that has dividers to house a sandwich, fruit, water bottle and cookie. Idea No. 1: Reduce packaging. Did you know each child typically generates 60 pounds of trash from their lunches per year? That's according to "The Big Green Purse," by Diane MacEachern, one of my favorite conservation info sources.
NEWS
January 18, 2000
In dieting circles, a lot of time is spent discussing which is best, a high-carbohydrate or a low-carbohydrate diet. What often gets lost is the overriding effect of total calories and the value of different types of carbohydrates: simple vs. complex; refined vs. unrefined. What do these descriptors for carbohydrates really mean, and why are they important? cont. from lifestyle Simple carbohydrates refer to single sugar molecules or pairs of sugar molecules bonded together.
NEWS
Chad Smith | November 2, 2012
Healthful eating starts with supportive nutrition. This means clean eating, or choosing foods that provide you with essential nutrients, including healthful fats (such as Omega-3), antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and especially protein. The easiest way to start eating clean is to get rid of the food in your day that supports your goals the least. What you are about to read consists of four unsupportive, unhealthful foods, but it is not exhaustive. But replacing these foods in your day with better options will go a long way to ensure you are on the right path to consistent clean eating.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
Grain products form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid - six to 11 servings are recommended daily. By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer Three Washington County Hospital employees have become breadwinners of a different sort, thanks to a recent contest. The hospital's nutrition services department sponsored an in-house bread-making competition during March, which was National Nutrition Month. Employees rose to the challenge by submitting 15 entries. Bread was selected because grain products form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid, and six to 11 servings are recommended daily, says Peggy Kemp, the hospital's clinical nutrition manager.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
For the french toast 16- to 20-ounce loaf sliced white bread, ends discarded 1/3 cup granulated sugar, plus extra for sprinkling 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 6 large eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 cups low-fat milk For the berry sauce 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 teaspoons cornstarch 3 cups fresh or frozen mixed berries 1/2 cup granulated sugar...
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | February 19, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Bread has meaning beyond the simplicity of its basic ingredients - yeast, flour, water or milk, fat, sugar and salt. It is what is requested in the Lord's Prayer, it is the sacrament of the Last Supper in Christianity. When people "break bread together" they are sharing more than a meal. It's history is long. Prehistoric people mixed grain meal with water and baked it on heated rocks to make flat bread. The Egyptians are believed to have learned to make bread with yeast - probably when batter left in the sun attracted air-borne yeast, which is a single-celled living plant organism, according to the Wheat Foods Council.
NEWS
By SCOTT C. ANDERSON / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 29, 2010
Maj. Gen. John Buford was a hard-charging man who didn't like to sit back and watch the battle. He fought intelligently at the Battle of Gettysburg on the ground of his choosing. He battled tactics and troop deployment that gave Union forces under Maj. Gen. John Fulton Reynolds time to come up and place a Union foothold outside Gettysburg, Pa. Had Buford not chosen the "high ground," the Battle of Gettysburg might have had a different outcome. In honoring this man, I came up with a straight forward sandwich using some of the freshest Wisconsin mozzarella I've tasted.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 28, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com George Wilson isn't a culinary connoisseur - but he knows his way around a grill, makes a mean bowl of instant oatmeal, keeps plenty of fresh vegetables in his crisper and owns a few cookbooks that he's actually opened. "The Thrill of the Grill" is a favorite. And he's peppered "Especially for Men: A Beginning Cookbook for Men" with various recipes clipped from other sources. Wilson may never make many of those recipes, but the retired college professor cooks enough to get by - and has a standing reservation at the Shepherd College food court for dinner.
NEWS
May 16, 2008
"Some few weeks back The Herald-Mail published an editorial on what should parents tell their children about sex. This has been a subject in your paper quite frequently, but most emphasized the school, church, anything but parents teach this subject. Look at the Amish people. They don't smoke, drink, do drugs or have a problem with teens. Parents should set the example. They have their own schools, so their children aren't subject to these problems, including carrying firearms and knives to school.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Chad Smith | November 2, 2012
Healthful eating starts with supportive nutrition. This means clean eating, or choosing foods that provide you with essential nutrients, including healthful fats (such as Omega-3), antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and especially protein. The easiest way to start eating clean is to get rid of the food in your day that supports your goals the least. What you are about to read consists of four unsupportive, unhealthful foods, but it is not exhaustive. But replacing these foods in your day with better options will go a long way to ensure you are on the right path to consistent clean eating.
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NEWS
By SCOTT C. ANDERSON / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 29, 2010
Maj. Gen. John Buford was a hard-charging man who didn't like to sit back and watch the battle. He fought intelligently at the Battle of Gettysburg on the ground of his choosing. He battled tactics and troop deployment that gave Union forces under Maj. Gen. John Fulton Reynolds time to come up and place a Union foothold outside Gettysburg, Pa. Had Buford not chosen the "high ground," the Battle of Gettysburg might have had a different outcome. In honoring this man, I came up with a straight forward sandwich using some of the freshest Wisconsin mozzarella I've tasted.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
For the french toast 16- to 20-ounce loaf sliced white bread, ends discarded 1/3 cup granulated sugar, plus extra for sprinkling 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 6 large eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 cups low-fat milk For the berry sauce 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 teaspoons cornstarch 3 cups fresh or frozen mixed berries 1/2 cup granulated sugar...
NEWS
By LEIF E. GREEN | September 13, 2008
Seems like summer was only yesterday. Sigh. Now it's time to make school lunches again. So how can we make those lunches a bit "greener" and more nutritious? First of all, take the lunchbox. For your little ones, use a box that has dividers to house a sandwich, fruit, water bottle and cookie. Idea No. 1: Reduce packaging. Did you know each child typically generates 60 pounds of trash from their lunches per year? That's according to "The Big Green Purse," by Diane MacEachern, one of my favorite conservation info sources.
NEWS
May 16, 2008
"Some few weeks back The Herald-Mail published an editorial on what should parents tell their children about sex. This has been a subject in your paper quite frequently, but most emphasized the school, church, anything but parents teach this subject. Look at the Amish people. They don't smoke, drink, do drugs or have a problem with teens. Parents should set the example. They have their own schools, so their children aren't subject to these problems, including carrying firearms and knives to school.
NEWS
November 19, 2006
1 loaf (16 ounces) of thinly sliced white bread, crusts removed 8 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 egg yolk 3/4 cup confectioners' sugar 1 cup sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 3/4 cup butter or margarine, melted Flatten bread with a rolling pin. In a medium mixing bowl, combine cream cheese, egg yolk and confectioners' sugar. In another bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon. Spread about 1 tablespoon (or more to taste) of the cream cheese mixture on each slice of bread.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 28, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com George Wilson isn't a culinary connoisseur - but he knows his way around a grill, makes a mean bowl of instant oatmeal, keeps plenty of fresh vegetables in his crisper and owns a few cookbooks that he's actually opened. "The Thrill of the Grill" is a favorite. And he's peppered "Especially for Men: A Beginning Cookbook for Men" with various recipes clipped from other sources. Wilson may never make many of those recipes, but the retired college professor cooks enough to get by - and has a standing reservation at the Shepherd College food court for dinner.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | February 19, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Bread has meaning beyond the simplicity of its basic ingredients - yeast, flour, water or milk, fat, sugar and salt. It is what is requested in the Lord's Prayer, it is the sacrament of the Last Supper in Christianity. When people "break bread together" they are sharing more than a meal. It's history is long. Prehistoric people mixed grain meal with water and baked it on heated rocks to make flat bread. The Egyptians are believed to have learned to make bread with yeast - probably when batter left in the sun attracted air-borne yeast, which is a single-celled living plant organism, according to the Wheat Foods Council.
NEWS
January 18, 2000
In dieting circles, a lot of time is spent discussing which is best, a high-carbohydrate or a low-carbohydrate diet. What often gets lost is the overriding effect of total calories and the value of different types of carbohydrates: simple vs. complex; refined vs. unrefined. What do these descriptors for carbohydrates really mean, and why are they important? cont. from lifestyle Simple carbohydrates refer to single sugar molecules or pairs of sugar molecules bonded together.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
Grain products form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid - six to 11 servings are recommended daily. By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer Three Washington County Hospital employees have become breadwinners of a different sort, thanks to a recent contest. The hospital's nutrition services department sponsored an in-house bread-making competition during March, which was National Nutrition Month. Employees rose to the challenge by submitting 15 entries. Bread was selected because grain products form the base of the Food Guide Pyramid, and six to 11 servings are recommended daily, says Peggy Kemp, the hospital's clinical nutrition manager.
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