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NEWS
July 5, 1999
QUINCY TOWNSHIP, Pa. - More than two acres of wheat were destroyed in a Monday afternoon fire that started when a farmer was baling the straw, a Greencastle fire department spokesman said. Chief Robert Ebersole of Rescue Hose Co. No. 1 said the cause of the fire, which burned a total of four acres of fields, is unknown. The farmer was moving a newly round bale of straw when it caught fire, Ebersole said. He dumped it off the farm equipment he was operating to keep the vehicle from catching on fire.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
School lunch menus for the week of Monday, Aug. 27, through Friday, Aug. 31: Washington County Monday - Chicken Patty on whole-wheat roll or grilled chicken pleezers, potato wedges, green beans and peaches. Secondary also may choose noodle soup. Tuesday - Spaghetti with meat sauce or peanut butter and jelly sandwich whith fruit yogurt, garden salad, whole-wheat breadstick and pears. Secondary also may choose tomato soup. Wednesday - Soft or crunchy tacos or Cuban pork barbecue on whole-wheat roll, corn, red beans and rice, and mandarin oranges.
NEWS
Lynn Little | January 15, 2013
If eating smarter and healthier is one of your New Year's resolutions, try focusing on eating more whole grains.  Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel - the bran, germ and endosperm.  Eating whole-grain foods helps increase fiber consumption and reduction of some chronic diseases. Fiber creates a feeling of fullness with fewer calories, which can help curb your appetite. Check the Nutrition Facts label for fiber content of whole-grain foods. Good sources of fiber contain 10 to 19 percent of the Daily Value; excellent sources contain 20 percent or more.  The color of a food is not an indication that it is a whole-grain food.
NEWS
February 5, 2007
Feb. 7-13 The Washington County Commission on Aging offers noon lunches to anyone 60 years and older at seven locations - Hancock, Smithsburg, Keedysville, Williamsport and three in Hagerstown. A two-day reservation notice is required and a donation is asked per meal. For information, call 301-790-0275. Wednesday - Baked penne with meat sauce, spinach salad with garbanzo beans, peaches, Texas toast and milk. Thursday - Rice soup, egg-salad sandwich, zucchini and tomatoes, banana, whole-wheat roll and milk.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | June 30, 2009
As I write this article, I am sitting in what you might call the "Buckle of the Bible Belt" - Oklahoma City. I am here on a family vacation, but felt I would share my observations, since I was encouraged by readers after last week's column on others' perspectives. As you can imagine, in Oklahoma, in the southern Great Plains, agriculture is a big deal, as they would say. They grow wheat here, and I mean a lot of wheat. This is the end of their harvest time, but all you see is either wheat being harvested, straw being baled or stubble ground being chisel plowed.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | February 27, 2008
Have you been looking for lowfat, nutritious foods that satisfy your hunger? Whole-grain foods are a good choice. You can enjoy the great taste of whole grains and satisfy your hunger, too. Whole-grain products can be readily included in your daily diet. Choosing whole-grain foods need not mean sacrificing food quality or flavor. Whole-grain food products are naturally flavorful and sweet with a taste sometimes described as nutty. The term "whole grain" defines a food with all three parts of the grain: bran, germ and endosperm.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 20, 2006
A key message from the U.S Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid program ( www.mypyramid.gov ) is, "Make half your grains whole grains. " We're encouraged to get plenty of fiber, B vitamins and other nutrients by selecting whole-grain food products over ones made from refined grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel - the bran, germ and endosperm and all their nutrients. Examples include: whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal and brown rice.
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NEWS
Lynn Little | January 15, 2013
If eating smarter and healthier is one of your New Year's resolutions, try focusing on eating more whole grains.  Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel - the bran, germ and endosperm.  Eating whole-grain foods helps increase fiber consumption and reduction of some chronic diseases. Fiber creates a feeling of fullness with fewer calories, which can help curb your appetite. Check the Nutrition Facts label for fiber content of whole-grain foods. Good sources of fiber contain 10 to 19 percent of the Daily Value; excellent sources contain 20 percent or more.  The color of a food is not an indication that it is a whole-grain food.
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NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | July 3, 2012
By the time you read this, wheat harvest in the Cumberland Valley will be nearly finished. Washington County, for its efforts, will harvest about 350,000 bushels, ranking it 12th in the state. If you have ever doubted the significance of wheat and other cereal grains to Washington County, simply drive around and read road signs. You will find Lehman's Mill, Leiters Mill, Charles Mill and McMahon's Mill, to name a few. Many of these mills were situated along streams and creeks, since water powered the mills when they were built.
NEWS
Melissa Tewes and Joe Fleischman | Your Health Matters | April 4, 2011
Consumers are often told to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables as they contain many disease-fighting nutrients.   Whole grains are often overlooked and are also an excellent source of these key nutrients. Experts agree that incorporating whole grains into a healthy diet has many added health benefits including reduction in heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes and obesity. There are few foods that offer such a diverse array of health benefits.   The United States Department of Agriculture recommends that half of our consumption of grains should come from whole grains.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | October 20, 2009
Last week, Beth Nichols, 4-H educator, ag tech Doug Price, myself and several 4-H and FFA volunteers were engaged in a project called "Kids Growing with Grains. " Don't let the title fool you; this program is aimed squarely at elementary- age youngsters to reunite them with where their food comes from. It's what I like to call agriculture literacy. Why is it important to know where your food comes from? Well, that's an easy one to answer. Ignorance is far from bliss. Knowing where your food comes from helps you make informed decisions when it comes to things like responsible land use and zoning.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | October 2, 2009
Dear Lynne, I recently read the new "thing" for foodies this year is farro. My ignorance is showing because I haven't a clue what this is. Can you help me out and also tell me where to find it and how to cook it? My pals love to be in on the latest; this time I want to get there first. Tired of Being Topped. Dear Tired, Before getting to details, you should know that farro is a grain with a warm, nut-like flavor and a hint of sweetness. Because of its low gluten content it is often favored by people who cannot eat wheat.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | June 30, 2009
As I write this article, I am sitting in what you might call the "Buckle of the Bible Belt" - Oklahoma City. I am here on a family vacation, but felt I would share my observations, since I was encouraged by readers after last week's column on others' perspectives. As you can imagine, in Oklahoma, in the southern Great Plains, agriculture is a big deal, as they would say. They grow wheat here, and I mean a lot of wheat. This is the end of their harvest time, but all you see is either wheat being harvested, straw being baled or stubble ground being chisel plowed.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
Washington County o All meals include a choice of milk and two selections of fruits and vegetables. An assortment of fresh, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables will be offered in all schools. Monday - Chicken tenders or cheeseburger. Tuesday - Beef teriyaki sticks with rice or chili corn carne with rice or corn muffin. Wednesday - Stuffed shells with marinar sauce or toasted cheese sandwich. Thursday - No school. Friday - No school.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Today, many folks are generations removed from the farm and in addition to their loss of connection they make very little effort to learn anything about agriculture. Upon a recent visit to Mt. Vernon, I was reminded there was a time in this nation's history that agrarian pursuits were not looked down upon. Many people today think if you cannot do it with a computer then it is not worth doing. While I enjoy much of the benefits that computers afford us I still prefer potato chips over computer chips when it comes to eating.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | July 13, 2008
Frying a whole-wheat pancake on the electric griddle could be considered a minor victory for Vicki Bodnar. Bodnar, 64, and her husband, Ted, spent two years, nine months and two days living out of hotels. They weren't vagabonds. They weren't in the midst of a financial crises. Their living situation was an alternative solution for a family in need of housing while searching for new real estate, Bodnar said. But no one thought it would take nearly three years for them to find a new home after they had sold their old one. Today, Bodnar reflects on that experience from her sprawling, spacious kitchen in Black Rock Estates.
NEWS
July 6, 2008
1 1/2 white whole-wheat flour (an equal blend of all-purpose flour and whole-wheat flour can be substituted) 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon instant yeast 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 cup warm (but not hot) water Lightly coat the inside of a medium bowl with cooking spray or oil. In a food processor, combine the flour, salt and yeast. Pulse several times to mix. With the processor running, drizzle in the olive oil, then let the processor run for 10 seconds to blend.
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