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by CANDICE BOSELY | May 4, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com If he wanted, Mark Schultz could joke that he was swamped while operating his Greenside Up Nursery and Landscaping business along the Jefferson-Berkeley county line on W.Va. 45. Swamped not in the sense that customers were endless and business was booming, but swamped in the literal sense. A foot or more of water flooded Schultz out last fall, and the water is just now starting to recede. Black plastic planting pots, tree skeletons and the dilapidated remains of a greenhouse jut from the water on the south side of the road, the former site of Schultz's business.
NEWS
September 26, 2000
Township seeks funds to build wetlands center By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Washington Township, Pa., owns 72 acres of historic wetlands on a plateau in Blue Ridge Summit that township officials hope one day to turn into one of the area's major environmental educational facilities, if they can raise the money to do it. continued ...
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | June 29, 2006
BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, PA. Washington Township, Pa., residents on Wednesday again spoke strongly against an 18-lot development proposed on Pennersville Road, two weeks before a representative of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is scheduled to address the township supervisors. Neighboring property owners have repeatedly said they feel the 6.31-acre property should be considered wetlands and cannot support the homes. The land, zoned low-density residential, is adjacent to the Happel's Meadow wetland preserve maintained by the township.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | August 22, 2006
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The lion's share of 6.31 acres designated for 18 new single-family houses in Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., will be appraised and possibly purchased by Washington (Pa.) Township. The township supervisors, backed by the opinion of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers representative, said the proposed homes, the chemicals on their lawns and runoff from their driveways could be detrimental to the ecosystems in the adjacent wetlands. The supervisors entered a closed-door executive session with Mercersburg, Pa., developer Thomas Mongold on Monday to discuss buying the land that abuts Happel's Meadow Wetland Preserve.
NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER | September 13, 2006
BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, Pa. - "We will get this saved, one way or another," Thomas Halligan said, motioning to the wooded area behind his property. Halligan is one of six citizens from the Pennersville Road area who met on Tuesday to show their determination to prevent the development of property that lies between their homes and the Happel's Meadow Wetland Preserve. Thomas Mongold of Mercersburg, Pa., owns the land and has proposed it as the site of the 18-lot Blue Oak development.
NEWS
October 4, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer The Tri-State area's watershed has no serious problems and is not especially vulnerable to pollution, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday. But in its first national assessment of regional water quality, the agency did say the watershed has lost a high number of wetlands and is prone to contamination from farmland runoff. More than 2,700 miles of rivers and streams in a four-state area make up the Conococheague-Opequon watershed, or drainage area.
NEWS
April 12, 2001
Upgrades begin at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Officials at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park have started work on $1 million worth of improvements at the site, including a new walking trail from Cavalier Heights to the lower town area. The trail, which will be about a mile and a half long, is designed to help visitors enjoy natural attractions along Shoreline Drive, such as wetlands.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 30, 2007
Chris J. Dempsher made up for the time he was unable to photograph the 14 turkeys that had flown into his backyard a little more than a week before Thanksgiving Day. He missed the shot because the shutter speed setting on his camera was too slow. But he got one more chance - five of those birds returned a few days later, on the Sunday before Thanksgiving. He finally got those turkeys. He took photos from inside his home behind a glass window, then sneaked outside and peered down into his own yard from behind a fence.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | November 19, 2004
trishr@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - A walking trail and wetlands restoration project around the Warm Springs middle and intermediate schools was approved by the Morgan County Board of Education on Tuesday evening. Project coordinator Dustin Hancock, a volunteer with Potomac Headwaters Restoration Conservation and Development, told board members the total trail length is just less than one mile. Hancock said a Federal Transportation Grant will allow the West Virginia Department of Transportation to complete the trail system, which will consist of a hard-surface portion and a rustic portion.
NEWS
October 7, 2008
BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, Pa. - A 190-foot cell tower behind the Pen Mar Youth League baseball field received unanimous approval from the Washington Township Supervisors on Monday. Liberty Towers, of Rockville, Md., still must submit a land development plan for the tower before construction can begin. The supervisors attached several conditions to their approval for the site off Pa. 16. Among them were fence requirements, tree screening and a stipulation that several wireless carriers be allowed to have antennae on the tower.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 7, 2013
The Northwest has the spotted owl; Jefferson County has the spotted turtle. A 3-2 vote Thursday by the Jefferson County Commission to rezone a 34-acre tract owned by Jefferson Asphalt on W.Va. 51 west of Charles Town might threaten the habitat of the turtle and some rare plants in the Altona Marsh, according to spokespersons from the Nature Conservancy, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources and the Conservation Fund Commissioner Walter Pellish, who made the motion to grant the rezoning, was supported by Patsy Noland and Jane Tabb.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | November 12, 2011
Mildred S. Miller, never a woman of means, still had enough to establish the 46-acre Stauffer's Marsh Nature Preserve that was dedicated Tuesday in a special ceremony. Miller died in 1999. "My mother never had much money and what she did have went to her will," her son, Stauffer Miller, said at the dedication a half-mile south of the village of Shanghai on Back Creek Valley Road. Stauffer Miller said his mother always instilled a love of the natural world in her children.
NEWS
April 30, 2010
MOUTH OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER (AP) -- Oil from a massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico oozed into Louisiana's ecologically rich wetlands Friday as storms threatened to frustrate desperate protection efforts. The White House put a hold on any new offshore oil projects until the rig disaster that caused the spill is explained. Crews in boats patrolled coastal marshes early Friday looking for areas where the oil has flowed in, the Coast Guard said. The National Weather Service predicted winds, high tides and waves through Sunday that could push oil deep into the inlets, ponds and lakes that line the boot of southeast Louisiana.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | November 4, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Five companies have sued the Jefferson County Commission over new land-use laws that the commission passed on Oct. 2, claiming the commission did not follow the correct procedures in passing the laws and that there are flaws in how the laws protect historic sites, wetlands and water wells. The suit, filed last Friday in Jefferson County Circuit Court, said the commission passed the new land-use laws - referred to as zoning - under a state code known as 8A-7-13.
NEWS
October 7, 2008
BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, Pa. - A 190-foot cell tower behind the Pen Mar Youth League baseball field received unanimous approval from the Washington Township Supervisors on Monday. Liberty Towers, of Rockville, Md., still must submit a land development plan for the tower before construction can begin. The supervisors attached several conditions to their approval for the site off Pa. 16. Among them were fence requirements, tree screening and a stipulation that several wireless carriers be allowed to have antennae on the tower.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | August 29, 2008
BEAVER CREEK -- More than 100 people packed a Beaver Creek church Thursday night for a mediator-facilitated discussion with developers about ways to reduce the negative impact of the proposed Hagerstown Gateway Shopping Center. The meeting marked the first time that representatives of the development company, Faison, had met directly with the public about the 850,000-square-foot shopping and entertainment center proposed for the area southeast of the Interstate 70/U.S. 40 interchange.
NEWS
May 2, 2008
W.Va. recycling event to last one month MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority and Apple Valley Waste Services have announced a month-long collection and recycling event for May. Any Berkeley County resident who is served by Apple Valley Waste can schedule the curbside pickup of up to two appliances, or residents can haul their metal, household appliances to the South Berkeley or Grapevine Road recycling centers,...
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 30, 2007
Chris J. Dempsher made up for the time he was unable to photograph the 14 turkeys that had flown into his backyard a little more than a week before Thanksgiving Day. He missed the shot because the shutter speed setting on his camera was too slow. But he got one more chance - five of those birds returned a few days later, on the Sunday before Thanksgiving. He finally got those turkeys. He took photos from inside his home behind a glass window, then sneaked outside and peered down into his own yard from behind a fence.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 27, 2007
WAYNESBORO, PA. - Washington Township, Pa., has less than 2 percent of the $150,000 in donations needed to expand Happel's Meadow Wetlands Preserve. And settlement on the land is in 14 days. The township supervisors said they will pull from general funds to write a check for the six acres off Pennersville Road in Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. However, they had hoped to raise the money locally to match a state grant when spending a total $300,000. Poor communication could be to blame for the dearth of donations, some residents said Wednesday.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 3, 2007
BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, PA. - Six weeks remain for Washington Township, Pa., to collect donations to further protect its mountaintop wetlands. The township supervisors will be writing a check for $300,000 when they buy six acres of land off Pennersville Road. The land, which once was planned for new houses, abuts the 72-acre Happel's Meadow Wetlands Preserve. The meadow naturally filters water and is the habitat for various plants, birds and animals. "It helps to purify the Chesapeake (Bay)
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