Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsWest Virginia Legislature
IN THE NEWS

West Virginia Legislature

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 23, 2004
As the West Virginia Legislature gears up for its 2004 session, Charleston has seen a mixture of the silly and the serious. Some lawmakers are making a real effort to grapple with important issues, while others seem content to make fools of themselves. In the foolishness category, there's the continuing debate over a bill to mandate some safety in operation of all-terrain vehicles. Lawmakers know they have to do something, since ATV crashes have killed 75 citizens of the state in the past three years.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
Teachers in Berkeley and Jefferson counties are planning a one-day walkout Wednesday to protest the 3.5 percent pay raise that was approved last week by the West Virginia Legislature. Students are being asked not to report to school. Central offices for both counties will be open, school officials said. Read the full story in Wednesday's Herald-Mail newspapers.
NEWS
April 12, 1997
From staff and AP reports CHARLESTON, W.Va. - In an action inspired by the death of a young Inwood, W.Va., woman, the West Virginia Legislature has passed a bill making it a felony for a motorist to lead police on a chase resulting in death. The bill, was approved unanimously by the House of Delegates on Saturday and sent to Gov. Cecil Underwood for his signature, the Associated Press reported Saturday. The maximum penalty would be up to 15 years in prison. The bill would establish five offenses with varying penalties.
NEWS
July 24, 2000
Man appointed to W.Va. education board Richard J. Shearer of Berkeley Springs has been named by Gov. Cecil Underwood to the newly formed West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Shearer replaces Dennis Bone of Charleston on the board. "Richard Shearer is an educated, highly successful executive who brings excellent credentials to the commission," Underwood said. Shearer is president and chief operating officer of U.S. Silica Co. of Berkeley Springs.
NEWS
May 9, 2005
WHEELING, W.Va. (AP) - The state's largest teacher's union has made a Tyler County physical education teacher its president. The West Virginia Education Association elected Charles Delauder, a teacher at Arthur I. Boreman Elementary School, to a three-year term during a meeting Friday in Charleston, W.Va. Tom Lange, who has been president for seven years, was ineligible to run for a fourth term. Delauder said his first priorities are working on getting a teacher pay raise during a special session of the West Virginia Legislature later this year and working for passage of a constitutional amendment allowing a bond sale to pay off state pension debt.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
Two years ago, the West Virginia Legislature passed a law its members felt would reduce the number of people killed each year while riding all-terrain vehicles. Things haven't gone quite as planned. It's time for lawmakers to revisit this issue. As of Saturday, The Associated Press reports that 34 have died in ATV accidents this year. At that pace, officials said, the state record of 40 that was set in 2005 should be broken long before January 2007. Pushing hard for modifications are the manufacturers themselves, whose lobbyist, Karen Coria, spoke to lawmakers on Monday.
NEWS
January 10, 2001
Unger named to state Senate committee CHARLESTON, W.Va. - An Eastern Panhandle lawmaker was named Wednesday to a new state Senate committee on economic development in the West Virginia Legislature. Sen. John Unger, D-Berkeley, was named to the Senate Select Committee on Economic Development by Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, who created only the second select committee in the six years he's served as Senate president. "Senator Unger started talking with me about the creation of this committee over a year ago," Tomblin said in a prepared release.
NEWS
September 23, 2004
By all means, the joint interim legislative committee looking at ways to cut prescription drug costs should listen to concerns expressed by some members of the West Virginia Legislature. But the first step in dealing with those issues should be to look at how other states have handled them. The West Virginia Pharmaceutical Cost management Council this month said that one way to cut costs would be to have a state-run centralized pharmacy buy drugs in bulk from manufacturers. Maryland has such a system, supplied by five drug companies.
NEWS
February 19, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Daryl E. Cowles will seek re-election to a second two-year term to the West Virginia House of Delegates. In 2006, Cowles was elected to the state Legislature representing the 51st Delegate district, which covers most of Morgan County and a portion of Hampshire County. "Although the state government is moving in a positive direction, there remains much work to be done," Cowles said in a news release. "Tax reform and stimulating the West Virginia economy are critical to improve the daily lives of our citizens, especially in the Eastern Panhandle.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | January 19, 2007
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - The Morgan County Commission will hold a public meeting next week to receive input on the reconstruction of the Morgan County Courthouse. The meeting will be Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the auditorium at Berkeley Springs High School. Morgan County Commission President Glen Stotler said the Needs and Assessment report from Silling and Associates will be presented, and Tom Potts of Silling, the Charleston, W.Va., architectural firm hired by the commission, will attend the meeting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 20, 2013
It's a privilege to be able to vote for Kump To the editor: I am writing in regard to how fortunate the voters of the 59th district in West Virginia are. Voters have the good fortune to be able to re-elect a true champion of independence and conservative ideals to the West Virginia Legislature. That champion is Del. Larry Kump. Living in Mineral Wells, W.Va., and not being able to vote for representatives of the 59th, you may ask, why would I care? I care, because I care about all of West Virginia.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | April 13, 2013
A bill that would provide support for the operation of MARC commuter train service in the Eastern Panhandle passed Saturday by a 98-1 vote in the House of Delegates on the last day of the West Virginia Legislature's 60-day session. The state Senate later concurred with amendments the House made to Senate Bill 103, which now awaits consideration by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, according to an audio webcast streamed live on the Legislature's website. The bill creates a special fund in the state treasury and requires the state to negotiate agreements with Maryland or the Maryland Transit Administration for the continued operation of the service from Washington, D.C., into West Virginia.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | April 6, 2013
Legislation aimed at eliminating “puppy mills” and providing minimum standards for horse-boarding facilities still are alive in the West Virginia Legislature after passing the Senate, the bills' lead sponsor said. “We've heard enough horror stories of hundreds of dogs packed into very confined spaces and the mistreatment of horses at boarding facilities. It's time to do something decisive, and these bills are a critical step forward.” state Sen. John Unger, D-Berkeley/Jefferson, said in a news release about the legislation's intent.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | March 19, 2013
Warren Mickey might have exaggerated, but he minced no words Tuesday telling Division of Highways officials they were moving too slow on plans to widen U.S. 340 South from Charles Town to the Virginia line. “You can't buy a gallon of milk between Charles Town and Berryville (Va.),” said Mickey, adding that widening the road would bring more stores to the corridor. Mickey, a member of the Eastern Panhandle Transportation Authority, will have to be patient. J. Lee Thorne, engineer and manager of DOH's seven-county District Five office in Burlington, W.Va., said the U.S 340 South project is still unfunded.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | October 27, 2012
Editor's note: This is one in a series of stories profiling candidates in the Nov. 6 general election. Jim Ruland is hoping to deny state Sen. Herb Snyder another four-year term in the West Virginia Legislature in the Nov. 6 general election. Snyder, D-Jefferson/Berkeley, and Ruland, his Republican opponent, have been vying for votes in the 16th Senate District, which includes all of Jefferson County and crosses into Berkeley County to include all of the city of Martinsburg and areas that generally are east and northeast of the county seat.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 25, 2011
Earl Ray Tomblin says his 30-plus years of experience in the West Virginia Legislature gives him a “unique background” that would serve him well if elected governor on Oct. 4. Republican Bill Maloney, perhaps not surprisingly, contends his Democratic opponent has used his political career in Charleston to build a “good ol' boy” network that helps his buddies and the Morgantown businessman asserts Tomblin isn't much of a leader. Tomblin, 59, of Chapmanville, W.Va., and Maloney, 52, of Morgantown, W.Va., are considered the front-runners in the upcoming special gubernatorial election.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 3, 2008
ANNAPOLIS -- After getting a peek at a different legislative universe, some visiting West Virginia lawmakers were brimming with observations. State lawmaking in Annapolis, they said, isn't the same as it is in Charleston. The five West Virginia legislators, all from the Eastern Panhandle, learned some ways of the Maryland General Assembly on Wednesday. Del. Walter Duke, R-Berkeley, said it was interesting that Maryland delegates may stand and explain their votes, and others may change their votes while the explanation is given.
NEWS
February 19, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Daryl E. Cowles will seek re-election to a second two-year term to the West Virginia House of Delegates. In 2006, Cowles was elected to the state Legislature representing the 51st Delegate district, which covers most of Morgan County and a portion of Hampshire County. "Although the state government is moving in a positive direction, there remains much work to be done," Cowles said in a news release. "Tax reform and stimulating the West Virginia economy are critical to improve the daily lives of our citizens, especially in the Eastern Panhandle.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 9, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Beginning today at noon, area residents will have the opportunity to avoid the 300-plus-mile trip to Charleston, W.Va., to gain a little insight on just how the state Legislature works, if only in the off-season. In addition to the 60-day regular session that begins each year in January, lawmakers are expected to take part in interim committee meetings, which are held to study issues and potential legislation. All of the meetings, which will be held today through Tuesday afternoon at the Holiday Inn in Martinsburg and other locations in the Eastern Panhandle, are open to the public, and elected officials are hoping area residents attend and participate in the sessions.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | June 19, 2007
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Daryl Cowles, a Berkeley Springs Republican who was elected to the House of Delegates' 51st District seat last November, said he enjoyed his first regular session, and he had time to learn the legislative process. "I was initially dependent upon building relationships with my colleagues, and that's a lesson I quickly learned," he said. House Speaker Del. Richard Thompson, D-Wayne, was newly elected to that position, Cowles said, and his leadership team of about 12 people was new to the job, so the legislature got a late start.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|