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West Nile Virus

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NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 30, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com As the death toll from the mosquito-borne West Nile virus continues to climb nationwide, health officials urge people to continue taking precautions against mosquitoes until colder weather arrives. The first hard freeze will make dormant the West Nile-infected mosquitoes that spread the virus by biting humans, animals and birds, Washington County Health Officer William Christoffel said. There is no evidence to suggest West Nile can be spread from person to person or from animal to person, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
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NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 30, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com Four horses and 42 birds have tested positive for West Nile virus in the Tri-State area, health officials in Maryland, Pennsylvania and West Virginia said recently. Three horses and 33 birds have tested positive for the virus in Washington County, said Laurie Bucher, the county health department's director of environmental health. More than 500 birds of about 1,400 tested in 21 jurisdictions statewide have been found positive for West Nile virus since surveillance began in Maryland on May 8, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | September 30, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com More than 2,100 old tires were dropped off at Forty West Landfill Saturday, one of seven drop-off places open to residents in a countywide effort to eliminate mosquito breeding places in the wake of the West Nile virus scare. The project, called Tire Amnesty Day, was Washington County's contribution in the fight against West Nile virus that is being detected around much of the United States. The disease can be fatal. Old tires lying around tend to collect water and provide excellent breeding spots for mosquitoes, which carry the disease.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | September 27, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com Washington County Health Department officials are encouraging county residents to help with the fight against the West Nile virus by participating in Tire Amnesty Day on Saturday. Removing tires from property can reduce the odds of exposure to the mosquito-borne virus, Health Officer William Christoffel said. "Tires are an excellent breeding ground for mosquitoes," Christoffel said Thursday. The event, sponsored by the Maryland Department of the Environment and the Washington County Solid Waste Department, drew 176 tons of tires last year, about 30 tons more than expected, Recycling Coordinator Harvey Hoch said Thursday.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | September 25, 2002
julieg@herald-mail.com The Washington County Health Department is taking an aggressive approach to fighting West Nile virus, which appears to be moving west through the county, a health official said Tuesday. With frost expected to arrive soon, health officials plan to hold off on spraying until the next mosquito season starts next spring, Environmental Health Director Laurie Bucher told the Washington County Commissioners on Tuesday. The hope is that the frost will eliminate the mosquito population this fall, she said.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | September 23, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com Three more birds and another horse have tested positive for West Nile Virus but no additional humans have tested positive for the mosquito-borne virus, Washington County Health Department officials said Friday. There was no new information on a Washington County resident and a Frederick County resident who preliminary test results indicate may have the first cases of West Nile Virus in those counties, Washington County Health Officer William Christoffel said Friday.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | September 19, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com Preliminary test results indicate Washington County and Frederick County may have their first cases of West Nile Virus in humans, Washington County Health Officer William Christoffel said Wednesday. More definitive test results may not be available until next week, Christoffel said. He said he did not know if either person was hospitalized or when the tests were conducted. The names of the doctors who requested the tests have not been made public, he said.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 13, 2002
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A second bird found in Berkeley County, W.Va., has tested positive for West Nile Virus, a county health official said Thursday. Berkeley County Health Department officials were notified Thursday that a blue jay found dead about three weeks ago on the west side of Martinsburg tested positive for the virus, said Twila Carr, chief sanitarian for the county. A pedestrian found the bird and took it to the health department to be sent to Georgia for testing, Carr said.
NEWS
by KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | September 10, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com A horse being treated for suspected West Nile virus at a Boonsboro farm tested positive for the potentially deadly disease but is expected to recover. The horse's owner, Debbie Starr, said she was notified Friday of the test results. She said her 20-year-old quarterhorse, Goldie, is showing signs of improvement. The typically healthy horse was placed in a harness on Aug. 14 after it became lame in its front legs and experienced tremors, twitching, teeth grinding and loss of appetite, Starr said.
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