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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 24, 2011
Mosquito spraying in Franklin County is scheduled to begin Tuesday in response to increased reports of mosquito populations. Franklin County’s West Nile virus coordinator, Raymond Eckhart, said mosquitoes have more spots to breed because of standing water from this month’s rains. This year’s spraying starts two weeks earlier than normal. The Penn State Cooperative Extension Office in Franklin County has received more calls than normal from residents reporting large quantities of mosquitoes, Eckhart said.
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NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | August 30, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Late tonight, Franklin County will become the only rural area of Pennsylvania to be aerially sprayed this year for mosquitoes capable of transmitting the West Nile virus. A plane flying overhead from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. Thursday will be misting Pyrocide 7396 over the boroughs of Chambersburg and Orrstown along with Lurgan, Southampton, Greene, Guilford, Hamilton and Letterkenny townships. The mist stays in the air and kills mosquitoes on contact, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
by KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | September 10, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com A horse being treated for suspected West Nile virus at a Boonsboro farm tested positive for the potentially deadly disease but is expected to recover. The horse's owner, Debbie Starr, said she was notified Friday of the test results. She said her 20-year-old quarterhorse, Goldie, is showing signs of improvement. The typically healthy horse was placed in a harness on Aug. 14 after it became lame in its front legs and experienced tremors, twitching, teeth grinding and loss of appetite, Starr said.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | October 8, 2003
shappell@herald-mail.com Two more horses have tested positive for West Nile virus, the Washington County Health Department said Tuesday. A spokesman also said the department is awaiting test results from three people suspected of having the virus, which can be fatal to humans. A department news release said one of the latest reported cases of West Nile virus involves a horse that began showing symptoms on Sept. 22. The release said another horse had to be euthanized on Sept.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 30, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com As the death toll from the mosquito-borne West Nile virus continues to climb nationwide, health officials urge people to continue taking precautions against mosquitoes until colder weather arrives. The first hard freeze will make dormant the West Nile-infected mosquitoes that spread the virus by biting humans, animals and birds, Washington County Health Officer William Christoffel said. There is no evidence to suggest West Nile can be spread from person to person or from animal to person, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | March 31, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Although Franklin County is just two weeks into spring, Ernest Tarner already is thinking about mosquitoes and the West Nile virus they may carry this summer. Tarner, manager of the Franklin County Conservation District, said he was recently notified that the county would receive $53,500 in state funding for mosquito surveillance programs. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has awarded counties across the state thousands of dollars since the virus was first identified in New York in 1999.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 27, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com The Eastern Panhandle recorded its first case of the West Nile virus Monday when Jefferson County health officials learned that a dead crow tested positive for the disease. The crow was found in a yard in Middleway on Aug. 16, said Rosemarie Cannarella, Jefferson County's health officer. A man who lived in a house on the property discovered the bird and turned it over to health officials for testing, Cannarella said. It was sent to the College of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Georgia, Cannarella said.
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