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Welfare Reform

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NEWS
October 3, 2006
Maryland's Department of Human Resources held a regional town hall meeting Sept. 25 at Hagerstown Community College. To garner public feedback on the second phase of welfare reform, Kevin McGuire, executive director of the Family Investment Administration, discussed the extension of welfare reform federal legislation known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families as provided by the Deficit Reduction Act of February 2006. As a result of the initial welfare reform legislation enacted in 1995, caseloads in many states have declined by 40 percent or more.
NEWS
July 12, 2000
When welfare reform turns into a spouse-batterer's tool For many people, welfare reform was the push they needed to get out of the house, get training and get a job. But as West Virginia officials have discovered, for those who abuse their spouses, the reform program is just another tool to help them control their victims. Fortunately, a new state program is working to change that situation. The sad reality of the situation was explained recently by Ann Menard, a special a special consultant to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services who spoke to a recent conference of advocates for the abused in Bridgeport, W.Va.
NEWS
August 10, 1999
Since federal welfare reform took effect two years ago, the number of cases on the West Virginia rolls have dropped from 36,691 to about 10,000. That's the fifth highest reduction in the nation, a fact which the average citizen applauds. So why aren't the state's elected officials happier about the issue? A group of state leaders interviewed as part of an Associated Press feature series on welfare reform told AP that, in the words of House Speaker Bob Kiss, "Anybody who thinks we're out of the woods is mistaken.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
Kevin McGuire, executive director of Family Investment Administration at the Maryland Department of Human Resources, presented an Outstanding Performance Award to David Engle, director of the Washington County Department of Social Services, during a ceremony in November in Baltimore. The award was in recognition of outstanding performance by the Washington County Department of Social Services Family Investment Staff during fiscal year 2005. The department was the only one in Maryland that achieved or exceeded all six of its Family Investment Performance goals in Welfare Reform programs.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | March 4, 1999
When Paulette Palmer's husband left four years ago, she had to go on welfare, receiving cash assistance to support her and her two young children. [cont. from front page ] In January 1998, the Hagerstown Junior College student stopped receiving cash assistance and was told to get a job as required by the 1996 welfare reform law. Because of those changes, many welfare clients in the Tri-State area can receive cash assistance for up to two years and then must be employed or on track for employment through job training or college.
NEWS
January 6, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer When women's rights activist Beverly Kipe speaks about welfare reform and the troubles abused women face, she's not just reading from the National Organization for Women handbook - she's lived it. Kipe, who took the helm of the Washington County chapter of NOW in May, spent years struggling to get out of a broken marriage and clear the barriers to economic independence. She said she returned to Washington County nearly 12 years ago without a husband, a job or a high school degree.
NEWS
October 2, 1998
That was the rallying cry of the welfare reformers, who reasoned that if they made it tougher to get on public assistance and put time limits on how long people could stay on the rolls, more able-bodied people would go to work. To the surprise of many welfare advocates, they were right, but there's a catch for many in West Virginia. Many of those jobs that provide the gateway into the working world don't include any health insurance. Under new welfare laws, most members of this new work force no longer qualify for Medicaid, which means they must seek health care anywhere they can get it. In this case, "anywhere" is the state's eight free clinics, which have seen their patient loads grow substantially as the welfare caseload dropped.
NEWS
August 9, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said Friday the recent budget deal approved by Congress and President Bill Clinton will help people by encouraging savings and reducing tax burdens. She specifically cited enhancements to individual retirement accounts (IRAs) and an increase in the amount of money that is exempt from federal estate tax as two of the most important features of the deal. "I think the tax cut will be very good," the Democrat said.
NEWS
September 26, 1997
By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer Aided by public assistance reforms and a prosperous economy, welfare rolls in Washington County have dipped to the lowest level in recent memory, officials said. As of Aug. 1, 550 families were receiving monthly welfare checks, compared to 1,350 cases in June of 1996 before the welfare-to-work reforms began, according to figures from the county Department of Social Services. The 59 percent decrease was greater than officials had anticipated.
NEWS
February 10, 1997
With newly-elected Gov. Cecil Underwood moving deliberately (some would say slowly) to take the reins of state government, the agenda for West Virginia's upcoming legislative session appears light, with one exception. Making the state conform to federal welfare reform laws may be the challenge of the decade. Under the federal law, after Jan. 1 West Virginia citizens are limited to five years' worth of benefits in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. Beginning this year, 25 percent of those currently receiving aid must participate in some sort of job-related activity.
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OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | November 2, 2012
The election of 2012 is fast approaching and will almost certainly send a message about the status of the welfare state in America. Is the dislike for government health plans and other social support programs so vocally disparaged by the Tea party and many Republicans in danger, or do they represent the voice of radical change? While it is historically true that we, as a culture, are dominated by an individualistic ethos, it is also true that a communitarian set of values has blunted its impact.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 12, 2011
The steps of the Rotunda at the Pennsylvania Capitol were a busy place Tuesday, with groups of Civil War re-enactors, schoolchildren and Bayada Nurses lining them within three hours of each other. Lawmakers, aides and lobbyists had to weave their way through tour groups all day. Legislative aides said this time of year is particularly busy in the Capitol halls because the General Assembly is in session and schools schedule field trips. One of the big events of the morning was a news conference marking the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. There, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett joined legislative leaders in highlighting the state's role in the war, including the Battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
November 10, 2008
"This is for the people who are calling in about the difference in prices of gasoline from one state to another. What you need to remember is each state has its own system of taxation on gasoline, so the price difference, what you're paying is more taxes in Maryland, while you're getting gas at a lower tax rate in other states. " - Hagerstown "I was so proud to see that Washington County majority voted for John McCain, a proven patriot who has served his nation for years, his father before him, and his son presently.
NEWS
October 3, 2006
Maryland's Department of Human Resources held a regional town hall meeting Sept. 25 at Hagerstown Community College. To garner public feedback on the second phase of welfare reform, Kevin McGuire, executive director of the Family Investment Administration, discussed the extension of welfare reform federal legislation known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families as provided by the Deficit Reduction Act of February 2006. As a result of the initial welfare reform legislation enacted in 1995, caseloads in many states have declined by 40 percent or more.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
Kevin McGuire, executive director of Family Investment Administration at the Maryland Department of Human Resources, presented an Outstanding Performance Award to David Engle, director of the Washington County Department of Social Services, during a ceremony in November in Baltimore. The award was in recognition of outstanding performance by the Washington County Department of Social Services Family Investment Staff during fiscal year 2005. The department was the only one in Maryland that achieved or exceeded all six of its Family Investment Performance goals in Welfare Reform programs.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | October 17, 2004
The Herald-Mail does not normally endorse candidates in the race for the White House. That's because, unlike the local races, where reporters and editors can talk to the candidates face-to-face, we have no more knowledge about the national races than any of our readers. Judging by some of the letters we get, some of our readers have a lot more knowledge about the national races than we ever will. But that doesn't mean we don't have opinions about these races. I have written that I voted for George W. Bush in the last election because I believed that Al Gore would say or do anything to be elected president.
NEWS
December 27, 2001
If legislators cut, it's up to non-profits It will be a hard year for the poor in West Virginia, if a legislative proposal to cut the state's welfare budget is accepted by Gov. Bob Wise. If so, private individuals and non-profits will have to be ready to bridge the gap. Wise got the report from the a group called the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Advisory Council, which spent three months looking at ways to trim $90 million from the state's welfare budget. Spared were almost all of the funds committed to providing direct cash payments of $453 a month to struggling families.
NEWS
December 21, 2000
Pennsylvania sets record in prevention By STACEY DANZUSO / Staff Writer, Chambersburg HARRISBURG, Pa. - The Pennsylvania Inspector General's Office was able to collect or prevent a record-breaking $142 million in welfare fraud last year, including nearly $1 million in Franklin County. The Inspector General's Office released the figures for fiscal year 1999-2000 in its annual welfare-fraud report this month, said W. Scott Foster, spokesman for the office that investigates fraud and misconduct in state government programs.
NEWS
July 12, 2000
When welfare reform turns into a spouse-batterer's tool For many people, welfare reform was the push they needed to get out of the house, get training and get a job. But as West Virginia officials have discovered, for those who abuse their spouses, the reform program is just another tool to help them control their victims. Fortunately, a new state program is working to change that situation. The sad reality of the situation was explained recently by Ann Menard, a special a special consultant to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services who spoke to a recent conference of advocates for the abused in Bridgeport, W.Va.
NEWS
August 10, 1999
Since federal welfare reform took effect two years ago, the number of cases on the West Virginia rolls have dropped from 36,691 to about 10,000. That's the fifth highest reduction in the nation, a fact which the average citizen applauds. So why aren't the state's elected officials happier about the issue? A group of state leaders interviewed as part of an Associated Press feature series on welfare reform told AP that, in the words of House Speaker Bob Kiss, "Anybody who thinks we're out of the woods is mistaken.
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