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Weeds

NEWS
June 18, 2003
The Hagerstown Code Compliance Office is starting its third annual Be Weed Free Campaign, which is designed to remind property owners to keep their sidewalks free of weeds. Property owners will get information about the campaign as an insert in their water bills, the city said in a news release. In cases where problems persists, property owners who do not comply can expect to be issued $200 fines and/or a fee for abatement, said John Lestitian, chief of code compliance. More information can be obtained by calling the office at 301-739-8577, ext. 194.
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NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | June 15, 2003
The news item in the paper confirmed what we all suspected: May of 2003 was rainy - rainy to the tune of a record 8.21 inches of liquid sunshine. After three dry springs the plants luxuriated in the soaking and, in spite of the cool weather, everything grew - especially the weeds. This will be the year for gardeners to assiduously weed, stake and lop. All this weeding, staking and lopping is somewhat alien to us since our major concern of the last several years has been to just keep the plants watered and growing.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | September 18, 1998
The city of Hagerstown has billed the state of Maryland for $637 because it had to bring in workers to cut grass and weeds around the former armory on Tuesday, officials said Thursday. Grass and weeds had grown to 3 to 4 feet high and mulberry and maples trees were 8 to 10 feet high between the fence and pavement, said Marc David, the city's code enforcement officer. The crew ended up filling two small dump trucks, David said. A five-member crew spent three to four hours chopping and mowing the weeds, trees and grass along the sides and behind the 328 N. Potomac St. building, he said.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | August 18, 2009
As you know, a plant can be the apple of one person's eye and the bane of another. One needs to remember that a weed is simply a plant out of place. When it comes to livestock producers, whether a plant is a weed will depend on what type of animal the producer is raising. To a dairy farmer, fescue can be a weed, but to a beef producer, it is high- quality winter feed. When it comes to small ruminants such as sheep and goats, the weed designation gets even more unclear.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 1, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- The Washington County Commissioners are closer to approving a revised weed control ordinance after hammering out some of the remaining questions Tuesday during a workshop session. When the commissioners first tackled the ordinance more than two months ago, discussion revolved around the broad question of where tall grasses and vegetation were, and were not, appropriate. By Tuesday's meeting, that question largely had been resolved, leaving only smaller details for discussion.
NEWS
April 8, 2009
This year, I resolve to keep ahead of the flower and vegetable gardens. Hahahahaha. No, seriously. I know I say this every year, but every year I get closer to meaning it. I am going to get things in the ground when they need to be in the ground -- no more waiting until June to plant the lettuce -- and I will react with alacrity to any threat. I will be the Paul Revere of early warning gardening action: One if by bug, two if by weed. Right now, as the weeds and bugs have yet to make a serious appearance, this seems doable.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | July 28, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- The Washington County Commissioners discussed Tuesday what types of properties should be required to have buffer zones, screening or both, as a condition of being permitted to grow tall grasses. The question came up during a workshop to discuss changes to the county weed control ordinance. The commissioners agreed that the ordinance needs some changes, but have not finalized the details of the revised version. The biggest change under consideration is a new section that would allow grass and other vegetation taller than the standard 18-inch limit if the property is part of a program to mitigate storm-water runoff, control pests or reduce pollutants in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | June 23, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- As they considered potential changes to the county's weed-control ordinance Tuesday morning, the Washington County Commissioners heard feedback from people with two very different visions for the future of residential subdivisions. One side values the suburban tradition of neat, weed-free lawns with carpets of 2 1/2-inch grass. The other, promoted by Washington County Soil Conservation District Manager Elmer Weibley, predicts a future in which tall, native grasses are not only permitted, but could be required in parts of new residential subdivisions as an environmental management strategy.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | September 1, 2012
From his modern home, it pains Henry Stiles to look a few hundred yards down Reno Monument Road and watch the deterioration of the historic farmhouse where he was raised. The overgrown yard and wild-weed fields around it have alarmed neighbors Tim Vittetoe and Jimmy Hartle for nearly two years. Sheri Anne Stewart, who bought the old house, barn, outbuildings and their 8.63-acre site a few rural miles south of Boonsboro in 2007, moved out in 2010 after she stopped paying on the mortgage.
NEWS
March 6, 2007
A Pennsylvania agency will be trying this summer to increase the awareness and control of noxious and invasive weeds on farm land in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program in the state. The Pennsylvania Resource Conservation & Development aims to help landowners learn to these bad weeds, while emphasizing the beneficial plants that improve wildlife habitat. Controlling noxious weeds is a requirement in the conservation reserve program. Some people have trouble recognizing them in their early and middle stages before they become established and more difficult to control.
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