Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsWeeds
IN THE NEWS

Weeds

NEWS
August 28, 2006
Steele will make a difference To the editor: In reply to the Linda Campbell editorial from the Aug. 9, 2006, Herald-Mail ("Candidate hides in weeds"), one should realize that the distortion, leaks and bias against certain candidates are the "weeds. " For that very reason, Michael Steele has made the decision to answer the questionnaire from The Baltimore Sun, with his policies published on the Web site. For years, the print media has had its way - particularly in a blue state such as Maryland.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JOE LAMP'L / Scripps Howard News Service | March 7, 2009
Each year my company scours the planet in search of the newest, coolest and best gardening gear and gadgets. The longer we do this, the harder it is to find those must-have items. In fact, this year was the first time we didn't certify our usual top 10 items. But the show must go on. So we revisited a few "Hall of Famers" and I present to you my nine "Best of the Must-haves" for 2009. Espoma All-Natural Weed Preventer: This eco-friendly corn gluten product is safe for children and pets, is a natural pre-emergence weed control and adds nitrogen to the soil, naturally greening your lawn while preventing weeds!
NEWS
September 23, 2008
"I'd like to take a moment and thank the sheriff, Mullendore, Washington County, for allowing (Deputy Steven) McCarty to go back into the Williamsport school district this year. It's a great comfort when you drop your child off with McCarty out front greeting children, talking to them. And (Deputy) McCarty has helped so many young people through school. I'd just like to take a moment and thank him. " - Williamsport "Would someone please explain to me, with the way our economy is, how they plan to fill planes with passengers twice weekly, flying to Disney World from Hagerstown?"
NEWS
June 21, 1999
Until this year, droughts have never caught my eye one way or the other. It always rains in the grocery store produce section, I reasoned. But this year is different. For reasons I have yet to resolve within myself, I've been playing the role of gentleman farmer, hilling potatoes, cutting poles for beans, plowing under cover crops, fertilizing asparagus, propagating blueberries and mowing meadows. I have learned to appreciate the lonely, rudimentary chink of a metal hoe blade against small stones, a primeval, tool-on-soil sound known since the beginning of the Hoe Age. Suddenly I have an awakened interest in plant life and all its attending lords, including the most important element, rainfall.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | October 20, 2009
Last week, Beth Nichols, 4-H educator, ag tech Doug Price, myself and several 4-H and FFA volunteers were engaged in a project called "Kids Growing with Grains. " Don't let the title fool you; this program is aimed squarely at elementary- age youngsters to reunite them with where their food comes from. It's what I like to call agriculture literacy. Why is it important to know where your food comes from? Well, that's an easy one to answer. Ignorance is far from bliss. Knowing where your food comes from helps you make informed decisions when it comes to things like responsible land use and zoning.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | April 24, 2005
This spring, spurred on by last year's heavy rains, the perennial weeds - self-heal, gill-over-the-ground and chickweed - have emerged with great vigor. As I attacked them this week, I had to admit, that although weeding isn't my favorite pastime, it does give one time to think. Some people sit and meditate, others pull weeds and ponder. What are those tiny seedlings under the lavender? Why is it that the Rosa rugosa alba pops up all over the garden yet when I try to separate the shoots from the mother plant they invariably die?
NEWS
July 12, 2006
Editor's note: The Morning Herald does not endorse any of these anonymous opinions. We encourage readers to put their names with their opinions through letters to the editor that appear each day on Page A4. "What puzzles me is how a politician can be a born-again Christian. Politics in itself is dirty business. A rabbit can be a rabbit and a squirrel can be a squirrel, but they cannot be both. " - Maugansville "I work from 4 in the afternoon to 4 in the morning.
NEWS
By Ric Dugan | August 30, 2005
Samantha Gloria of Hawaiian Gardens, Calif., clears weeds Monday near Beaver Creek. Gloria was among a dozen AmeriCorps volunteers at the Newcomer Farm in Boonsboro doing maintenance work on stream fencing and a buffer as part of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation Farm Stewardship Program. The program is designed to help farm owners install and maintain buffers and fencing along waterways that feed the Chesapeake Bay. More than 500 trees and shrubs and 1,000 feet of fencing were installed this spring in the Beaver Creek and Antietam watersheds.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 28, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com If you search for "weeds" on the home page of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Web site - www.usda.gov - the first two links that come up are "weed identification. " There are photos of buckwheat, pigweed and lambsquarters. Below them are pictures of seedlings, and you're supposed to match them to the adult plants. As if. Three strikes for Katie. But identification is important. The first step in controlling weeds is identifying them, says Sandy Scott, horticulture consultant for the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|