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By HEATHER KEELS | November 30, 2007
Hagerstown man sentenced in assault, attempted stabbing A 21-year-old Hagerstown man was sentenced to eight months in jail Wednesday for assaulting and attempting to stab a 17-year-old during a confrontation the night of July 22, according to court documents. Ryon Graham Bland, of 738 Lanvale St., pleaded guilty to second-degree assault and reckless endangerment in Washington County District Court, records show. Witnesses told police the conflict began when Bland approached a group and asked one of them, "Do you see something you like?"
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NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | September 30, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com Effective Saturday, the Washington County Commissioners can make the penalty for violating the county's animal control ordinance more severe. And if you have an alarm system, false alarms could cost you. Ten new enabling laws giving local governments authority in areas ranging from regulating weeds to raising the salary for the next county sheriff take effect Saturday. Requested by local authorities, they were sponsored by the Washington County Delegation and approved by the Maryland General Assembly earlier this year.
NEWS
October 17, 1998
DOWNSVILLE - The call is going out for more strong backs to continue the repair work on the crumbling pre-Civil War fence rows that stretch for several miles on both sides of the Dam No. 4 road. The first clean-up was held on Sept. 26 with more than a dozen people showing up. A second round occurred Oct. 10 but the work is far from over. New clean-up dates include Oct. 24, Nov. 7 and Nov. 21 - all Saturdays and all starting at 8 a.m. The Rev. Jan Dorsey, pastor of the Downsville Church of the Brethren, is hoping groups of people as well as individuals might volunteer, bringing their own tools and parking in the church lot. "The fences were dry stacked when they were built.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | November 6, 2007
"Would you believe we're still getting tomatoes?" Norma Sayles said Thursday. "As dry as it's been, this has been the best crop of tomatoes in years," said Sayles, president of Potomac Garden Club based in Williamsport. Sayles, who lives in Halfway, also hadn't bothered to buy any mums because her geraniums were still doing well. "I know everyone decorates with pumpkins and mums. My geraniums are still beautiful out front," she said. This year's warmer autumn is mostly good news for homeowners and gardeners as it gives them more time to work on outdoor home and landscaping projects before freezing conditions set in, experts said.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | July 18, 2005
Last weekend, the barren lawn looked like an old sepia print. Yet springing up amidst the brown, dock, dandelions, thistles, plantain were growing. Their long taproots were doing their job by pushing down into the depths of the dry soil to survive in the bleak moonscape of the lawn. Naturalist John Burroughs (1837-1921) got it right when he perceptively wrote in "Pepacton," "But weeds have this virtue; they are not easily discouraged; they never lose heart entirely; they die game.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | September 20, 2008
We still have openings in our landscape design classes. Maybe you want to make some changes to your landscape. It is always good to develop a plan, and then as you are able to afford the plants, you can add to your landscape. The classes start on Thursday, Oct. 2, and cover the basic tools and principles you will use to develop your plan. Then, during the next five weeks, you will learn how to select trees, shrubs, native plants and other features for your landscape. One of the Master Gardeners will sit down with you and review your plan to be sure it meets your needs.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | July 10, 2005
We were delighted that so many of you attended our open house last weekend. Gardens are best when they are shared. It's always a treat to have new eyes look at the garden. As we toured around the property, we were constantly confronted with unexpected pleasures. The Russian sage by the front walk, cut to the ground in April, is now a fountain of gently moving purple wands. Brightly blooming echinacea rears up out of a mass of steel blue sea holly, safe from the predatation of the local rabbit population.
NEWS
June 2, 2003
"Now all those people trying to avoid the real issue of child safety, you are going to bring up car tags and where they are from. The other day, I saw tags from West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Georgia, D.C. Who cares where they have their cars registered? Worry about where these children are coming from and overcrowding the schools. " "If anyone can use any National Geographics, put your number in the paper and I will call you. " "Last week, I drove by Pangborn Park and it looks really nice.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | June 28, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT -- When Brent Bailey looks out over Springfield Run, he sees more than water. He sees biology, history and a chance to protect the environment. He also sees community service. "This stream is a part of Williamsport," Bailey said. "It's important to take care of it. " That's why Boy Scout Troop 17 has adopted Springfield Run and has pledged to keep it clean. "This is a big part of what Scouting is about -- giving back to the community," said Bailey, who is a member of the troop committee.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | June 30, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT - When Brent Bailey looks out over Springfield Run, he sees more than water. He sees biology, history and a chance to protect the environment. He also sees community service. "This stream is a part of Williamsport," Bailey said. "It's important to take care of it. " That's why Boy Scout Troop 17 has adopted Springfield Run and has pledged to keep it clean. "This is a big part of what Scouting is about - giving back to the community," said Bailey, who is a member of the troop committee.
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