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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 27, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Two City of Hagerstown employees who were permitted to hunt at the city-owned Edgemont Watershed no longer will be able to do so, at least for now. Even though authorities banned hunting on the property last year, the two city employees were given special permission to hunt at the watershed in exchange for doing work there on their own time. City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said Friday the decision to review the matter was made Wednesday so the city's attorneys could examine who would be held liable if someone was hurt.
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | October 25, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Two City of Hagerstown employees have permission to hunt at the Edgemont Watershed, even though a hunting ban was imposed in that area last year. City utilities director Mike Spiker explained the situation Wednesday in response to complaints from a Pleasant Valley resident who claimed the city was exercising unfair hunting practices. Spiker said during a telephone interview that the hunting ban was imposed for safety reasons. The employees, whom Spiker declined to identify, are permitted to hunt on the city-owned property in exchange for doing work at the watershed on their own time, he said.
NEWS
June 6, 2009
The Beaver Creek Watershed Association Inc. was founded by concerned neighbors and local fly fishermen with an objective to scientifically restore, protect and preserve the water quality of the Beaver Creek Watershed, according to its Web site. It recently assisted Greenbrier Elementary School in Boonsboro and the Mount Aetna Adventist School in Hagerstown receive grant funds for stormwater retrofit projects. Utilizing a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust, rain gardens are being created for the treatment of stormwater runoff from the rooftops of the school buildings, which will better protect Beaver Creek.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | April 24, 2006
BEAVER CREEK - A study by a nonprofit organization examining stream conditions in the Beaver Creek Watershed found areas threatened by cattle, runoff and damage to buffer zones on the banks. In some sections of Black Rock Creek, water temperatures last summer approached 90 degrees, the study said. And about one-third of a section of stream about 20 miles long was in good condition, a watershed analyst for the Center for Watershed Protection said. "The rest of it was fair to poor," Jennifer Tomlinson said.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 11, 2005
marlob@herald-mail.com With a $150,000 grant awarded recently through the Chesapeake Bay Trust, the Beaver Creek Watershed Association will develop an assessment and protection plan in conjunction with the Center for Watershed Protection. Funding also will support the association's partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's farm stewardship program, under which landowners commit to a 15-year agreement to protect and restore stream banks on their properties, according to Jennifer Caddick, director of communications for the Trust.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | July 7, 2005
Beaver Creek is going to be the focus of a two-year, $150,000 grant that is part of a larger group of grants aimed at improving the health of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, officials said Wednesday. At a farm off Beaver Creek Church Road, Chesapeake Bay Trust officials on Wednesday presented a ceremonial check to the Beaver Creek Watershed Association, which will manage the grant locally. "All water flows downstream, and it all ends up in the Chesapeake Bay," said Dr. Michael Saylor, Beaver Creek Watershed Association president, after Wednesday's event.
NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | April 8, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Antietam Creek wraps around Waynesboro in two branches, east and west, that meet south of the borough at Pa. 316 near the Maryland state line. From there the creek runs into the Potomac River and eventually the Chesapeake Bay. In large terms, it's part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Closer to home it's the Antietam Creek Watershed, and that's what a new citizens group being organized by a Waynesboro physician hopes to protect. The organizers met last week for the first time.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | June 4, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The City of Hagerstown will begin accepting applications July 1 from people who want to hunt this year on the city-owned Edgemont Watershed. The City Council on Tuesday gave Utilities Director Michael Spiker permission to collect applications from July 1 to Aug. 15. Applications will be accepted from across the state, but only 50 will be granted permits, Spiker said. "If it's 50 or more, it will be limited to Washington County residents," he said. If more than 50 people apply, Spiker said names will be drawn from a box to ensure fairness.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | May 25, 2009
Rain gardens help clean creeks WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Start with the Beaver Creek Watershed Association, add a stay-at-home mom with a background in environmental biology, throw in two schools in need of a coordinator for their environmentally friendly rain garden projects and the result is a perfect mix. Susan Simonson moved to Washington County in 2003 and within a week, Doug Hutzell, a "driving force behind BCWA," was knocking on...
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