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NEWS
November 10, 2012
The Antietam Creek Watershed Alliance recently was awarded a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust to repair a failing stone-lined stream in a homeowner's backyard, protecting the waters that eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay. The unnamed stream flows through private lots in Sharpsburg and carries stormwater runoff from rooftops, parking lots and roads. Decades ago, the stream was lined with stone walls and concrete bottoms to help control the direction of the water flow. However, time and increased runoff caused the walls to fail in some locations, resulting in severe stream bank erosion, which muddies the stream carrying sediments to Antietam Creek, the Potomac River and eventually to the Chesapeake Bay. Homeowner Chris Mullendore lives along this small stream and was concerned that the erosion would progress to where the stream eventually would swallow up the outbuilding in his backyard.
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NEWS
June 11, 2012
Funkstown officials agreed Monday night to do what the town can afford to do to reduce nitrogen and phosphorous discharges into the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Municipalities and counties in the state are being asked to decide by June 30 whether they will do what they can afford to help the bay; won't do anything; or will adopt a plan that states the local government will spend its estimated target amount in the next 13 years to reduce nutrient discharge. For Funkstown, that amount is $4.1 million for stormwater runoff projects.
NEWS
by ASHLEY HARTMAN | July 19, 2007
WAYNESBORO, PA. - The Washington Township meeting room was packed Wednesday night, and it wasn't for a township supervisors meeting. Representatives of Corporate Office Properties Trust, Fort Ritchie (COPT) and PenMar Development Corp. attended an Antietam Watershed Association meeting to discuss and answer questions related to the redevelopment of Fort Ritchie and its impact on the Falls Creek area. Falls Creek is a major tributary to the Antietam Watershed. Citizens addressed their questions to Bill Hofmann, senior property and environmental services manager for COPT, and Rich Rook, executive director of PenMar Development Corp.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | August 7, 2011
A number of watersheds, large and small, wind their way through Jefferson County on their way to the Potomac River and eventually into the Chesapeake Bay. In the next few weeks, thanks to members of the Jefferson County Water Advisory Committee and a local Boy Scout, county residents will see interpretive markers telling the stories of five of those watersheds. The watercourses singled out for recognition by the committee, with one marker each, are Blue Ridge, Evitts Run and Elk Run watersheds, plus two markers for the Town Run Watershed in Shepherdstown, W.Va.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Twenty-two volunteer watershed associations across the state, including four concerned with area streams, will receive up to $5,000 in grant money to use in their local water quality improvement efforts in the coming year, West Virginia Stream Partners Program officials announced. Stephanie R. Timmermeyer, cabinet secretary of the state Department of Environmental Protection, along with directors of the West Virginia Conservation Agency, West Virginia Division of Forestry, and the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources have awarded grants to - Cacapon and Lost River Land Trust for the Lost & Cacapon rivers, which travel through Hardy, Hampshire and Morgan counties.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | November 30, 1999
HAGERSTOWN ? Two City of Hagerstown employees who were permitted to hunt at the city-owned Edgemont Watershed no longer will be able to do so, at least for now. Even though authorities banned hunting on the property last year, the two city employees were given special permission to hunt at the watershed in exchange for doing work there on their own time. City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said Friday the decision to review the matter was made Wednesday so the city's attorneys could examine who would be held liable if someone was hurt.
NEWS
By ASHLEY HARTMAN | July 21, 2007
WAYNESBORO, PA.-The Washington Township meeting room was packed Wednesday night, and it wasn't for a township supervisors meeting. Representatives of Corporate Office Properties Trust, Fort Ritchie (COPT) and PenMar Development Corp. attended an Antietam Watershed Association meeting to discuss and answer questions related to the redevelopment of Fort Ritchie and its impact on the Falls Creek area. Falls Creek is a major tributary to the Antietam Watershed. Citizens addressed their questions to Bill Hofmann, senior property and environmental services manager for COPT, and Rich Rook, executive director of PenMar Development Corp.
NEWS
December 15, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Fifteen students, parents and faculty members from Wildwood Middle School traveled to the Spruce Knob Moutain Center in Pendleton County, W.Va., Oct. 29 and 30 to study stream and watershed ecology. The goal of the educational field trip was to provide students and teachers living in the Potomac and Chesapeake Bay watersheds an opportunity to engage in inquiry-based outdoor science. The trip was the first in a yearlong study of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
NEWS
Susie Hoffman | Around Funkstown | May 7, 2013
The Antietam Creek Watershed Alliance will host the following speakers at Funkstown Town Hall, 30 E. Baltimore St. The events are free and open to the public: • Thursday, May 16  - “Recreational Fishing Opportunities on the Antietam;” learn about fishing by wading or by boat on Antietam Creek; presented by Mike Dudash, environmental educator from River and Trail Outfitters; 7 p.m. • Thursday, June 13 - “Becoming Bay-Wise: Creating Healthy,...
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | July 9, 2012
Like those in most other municipalities across Washington County, Clear Spring officials Monday night acknowledged the federal nutrient-reduction targets aimed at cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay, but called the estimated $1.3 million price tag for suggested improvements financially unfeasible. Clear Spring Town Council members in June reviewed a list of potential projects that the town could undertake as part of Phase 2 improvements in the county's Watershed Implementation Plan, or WIP, that would attempt to reduce the amount of nitrogen and phosphorous that makes its way to the bay by 2025.
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