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Water Quality

NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | July 23, 2007
Two former Washington County employees were indicted last week on charges of extortion by a public official, Deputy State's Attorney Joseph Michael said Monday morning during a press conference at the Washington County Sheriff's Department. Both employees were fired from their jobs with the Washington County Department of Water Quality earlier this year, Michael said. The indictments allege that James Ernest Bishop, Jr., 61, of Williamsport, former water quality deputy director, convinced two companies performing work locally to give him laser survey levels worth more than $500 each.
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NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | March 7, 2007
After two weeks out of the office, I spent this past Sunday morning catching up on what had happened while I was gone. For me, the most interesting story was the Washington County Commissioners' decision to name Greg Murray Washington County administrator. I feel that way for several reasons. The first is that Murray, whose last job was as head of the Department of Water Quality, becomes administrator at a time when water and sewer issues are more important than ever. In an interview last July, Murray and Merle Elliott, who chaired a two-year study of the county's water and sewer issues, told me that as part of an effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland has put a moratorium on the expansion of sewer plants.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | March 4, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Managing growth, rising property taxes and limited water and sewer capacities are among the many issues Gregory B. Murray expects to face in his new role as Washington County administrator. But one of his biggest challenges, he said, deals with perception. Murray, 46, wants to change "the stigma that county government is inefficient or not there to serve the citizens. " "We want to make sure that all citizens realize that county government is their government," Murray said.
NEWS
by DAN DEARTH | March 3, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Washington County Commissioners have created a new department to handle the county's environmental needs, particularly the disposal of solid waste, County Commissioners President John F. Barr said. Barr said the county's existing Water Quality and Solid Waste departments will integrate to become the Division of Environmental Management. The consolidation won't take place, however, until a director of the Division of Environmental Management is named, Barr said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | February 19, 2007
HAGERSTOWN The U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed installing a water-quality monitoring system inside the R.C. Willson Water Treatment Plant in Williamsport, according to Mike Spiker, the City of Hagerstown's utilities director. The equipment would monitor raw water from the Potomac River for biological and chemical contaminants, and act as an early-warning device for the city in case impurities are found, Spiker said last week. Hagerstown gets its water supply from the Potomac River and the Edgemont Reservoir.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | February 9, 2007
Two employees at the Washington County Department of Water Quality are on administrative leave with pay, Commissioners President John F. Barr said Thursday. Barr said he could not provide details on the "internal employee matter" other than to say changes in the department were planned. "Administrative adjustments are going to have to be made in that department," Barr said. The commissioners will discuss the matter Tuesday in a closed meeting. The employees were placed on leave with pay Wednesday afternoon, Barr said.
NEWS
July 18, 2006
HARRISBURG - The quality of water in Pennsylvania is improving thanks to recent changes in nutrient management regulations by the State Conservation Commission, Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff said. "We commend the State Conservation Commission and the Nutrient Management Advisory Board for their dedication in making these revisions," said Wolff, who is also chairman of the State Conservation Commission. The new regulations are a balance between properly applying manure generated on high-density animal operations - those with more than 2,000 pounds of animals per acre - without overly restricting the movement of nutrients throughout the state.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | April 5, 2006
No members of the public commented Tuesday on Washington County's proposed increases to water and sewer rates and Forty West Landfill fees. The County Commissioners held two public hearings on the proposals. The Department of Water Quality has proposed raising water rates by 3 percent and sewer rates by 2 percent for residential customers. The Solid Waste Department proposed raising Forty West Landfill permit and tipping fees by $5 to $10. The commissioners are expected to vote on the proposed increases on April 18.
NEWS
January 19, 2006
CLEAR SPRING - Water customers in Clear Spring need to be on the lookout for cloudy water conditions today and Friday as hydrants are scheduled to be flushed. Town Clerk Juanita Grimm said low water pressure might affect water quality during the flushing process.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 19, 2005
CLEAR SPRING - Mandatory water conservation measures were enacted Tuesday in Clear Spring due to a system leakage that has reduced the available water supply for customers. "Town and county personnel are out looking for the leak or leaks," Town Clerk Juanita Grimm said Tuesday afternoon. Water customers are prohibited from using water for anything other than what is necessary to maintain sanitary conditions and for cooking. These restrictions are designed to prevent further loss of the town's water supply.
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