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Water Levels

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NEWS
September 17, 1999
Maryland Natural Resources Police are urging boaters, swimmers and wading fishermen to stay off the Upper Potomac River and its creeks and streams as water levels swell after recent rains. Water levels on the Potomac River have reached the caution stage for recreational use from Cumberland, Md., to Harpers Ferry, W.Va., according to Natural Resources Police. River levels at Millville, W.Va., are considered hazardous, affecting levels downstream from Harpers Ferry to Little Falls, Md., the agency reported.
NEWS
BY TARA REILLY | March 5, 2002
BOONSBORO - Ground water and reservoir levels remain sufficient in Boonsboro, but the town's manager said Monday night that the drought is so severe it will take five years before water levels throughout Washington County are back to normal. "This drought is worse than in 1999," Town Manager Jake Jones said. The Boonsboro Town Council discussed the drought at its Monday night meeting. The town has asked residents to voluntarily conserve water until the drought is over.
NEWS
March 7, 1997
Boating and other recreational activities on the upper Potomac River should be avoided because of hazardous water levels, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said Friday. Water levels are hazardous for recreational use along the main stem of the river from Kitzmiller downriver to Cumberland and at Paw Paw, Harpers Ferry, Little Falls and the Monocacy because of continued rain in the Potomac River Basin, a natural resources police news release said. Conditions throughout the Potomac River basin are expected to remain hazardous until early next week.
NEWS
April 16, 1999
Boating and other recreational activities on the upper Potomac River should be avoided through Monday because of hazardous water levels, Maryland Natural Resources Police said. Water levels are hazardous for recreational use along the main stem of the Potomac from Cumberland, Md., through Washington County due to recent rainfall, a Natural Resources Police news release said. The warning doesn't apply to professionally guided river trips or to teams of experienced white-water paddlers.
NEWS
March 10, 1998
Boating activity prohibited Boating and other recreational activities on the upper Potomac River should be avoided through Friday because of hazardous water levels, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said Monday. Water levels are hazardous for recreational use along the main stem of the Potomac River from Cumberland Md., in West Virginia at Paw Paw, Springfield and Harpers Ferry, and at Millville on the Shenandoah River because of recent rain in the Potomac River Basin, according to a natural resources police news release.
NEWS
March 5, 1999
Boating and other recreational activities on the upper Potomac River should be avoided through Monday, March 8, because of hazardous water levels, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said Friday. Water levels are especially hazardous for recreational use from Shepherdstown to Harpers Ferry in West Virginia because of recent heavy rains. This warning doesn't apply to professionally guided river trips or teams of experienced white water paddlers. Hazardous stages are defined as water levels at which novice boaters, wading fishermen or anyone in a vessel could be confronted with a life-threatening situation because of wave action, hypothermia, high velocity or treacherous current.
NEWS
March 20, 1998
Warning issued for area streams Boating and other recreational activities on the upper Potomac River should be avoided through Monday because of hazardous water levels, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said Friday. Water levels are hazardous for recreational use along the main stem of the Potomac and at Millville on the Shenandoah River because of recent rain and forecasts of heavy downpours late Friday, a police news release said. The warning doesn't apply to professionally guided river trips or teams of experienced white water paddlers.
NEWS
April 8, 1998
Boating and other recreational activities on the upper Potomac River should be avoided because of hazardous water levels, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said. Water levels are hazardous for recreational use along the main stem of the Potomac from Harpers Ferry downriver to Little Falls, and at Millville on the Shenandoah River, a natural resources police news release said. River levels are expected to gradually fall, but conditions throughout the Potomac River basin are expected to remain hazardous until Friday.
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NEWS
April 18, 2011
The Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers overflowed their banks in the wake of Saturday's heavy rains, creating some minor flooding. The town, very vulnerable to flooding, saw its sewer system overflow and huge potholes created in the road over the weekend. Rick Garland, a tour guide in Harpers Ferry, says the Potomac reached 19 feet, about a foot above flood stage, causing a very fast current and strong rapids where the two rivers come together. The river started to recede after cresting early Monday, and water levels have been going down all day. - Caleb Calhoun
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NEWS
By CELESTE MAIORANA / Special to The Herald-Mail | June 12, 2010
Our woodlands are important to clean water and vibrant healthy ecosystems. The woodlands and the water bodies and ways they buffer also present tremendous recreational opportunities. Take a walk, view plants and animals, fish, run, bike, boat, float or raft. Go alone or with friends, family or a guided group. Getting out into the great outdoors is fun and healthy. Part I of this series, published in January, gave an overview of the region's public lands and their recreation possibilities.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | May 7, 2009
TRI-STATE -- The National Weather Service early Thursday canceled a flood watch that had been in effect in the Tri-State area as rainfall that has soaked the area this week has diminished. Despite heavy rain that was pounding Hagerstown at times Wednesday night, weather forecasters were not expecting waters on the Potomac River to go above flood stage in local towns along the river Thursday or Friday. However, water was starting to cover Md. 63 in the Broadfording area in Washington County and over Big Pool Road near Four Locks in the Clear Spring area as of 9 p.m., according to a 911 dispatcher.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | May 4, 2009
TRI-STATE -- The Potomac River passed flood stage Tuesday in Paw Paw, W.Va., but it is too early to tell whether the levels elsewhere will stay below that stage as more rain hits the area, a weather official said. A frontal system is currently stalled over the region, which is triggering "batches of precipitation," National Weather Service spokesman Calvin Meadows said Tuesday afternoon. The system could dump another 1 1/2 inches of rain on the Washington County area by Thursday afternoon, Meadows said.
NEWS
April 21, 2008
Click here for locations map. Old Mill Road in the 200 block at Ledge Drive and Lupton Drive N. Tennessee Ave. at the entrance to Briarwood E. John St. at Oak St. The water levels became critical shortly after 6:30 a.m. as the streams and creeks began to overflow their banks. Martinsburg Police urge motorists not drive through standing or moving water in and around these areas. If you witness an emergency situation please contact the Berekeley County Central Dispatch at 911 or the Martinsburg Police Department at 304-264-2100.
NEWS
March 7, 2008
Several Washington County roads remained closed Thursday due to high water in the aftermath of heavy rains Tuesday and early Wednesday. A flood warning for Conococheague Creek remained in effect throughout Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. Water levels in the creek reached 11.4 feet - nearly 3 1/2 feet above flood stage - at Fairview at 6:30 a.m. Thursday. All flood warnings had been lifted by 6 a.m. Friday, according to the National Weather Service. Washington County Fire and Rescue Communications got a call at 9:16 a.m. Thursday from the friend of a woman who called to say the woman's vehicle stalled after she drove into high water on Wishard Road off Md. 494. "I got the woman's cell phone number from her friend and called her," said James Ulrich, the dispatcher who took the call.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | November 28, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The discussion continues on whether zoning would be good for Berkeley County. During a public hearing Tuesday night on a proposed zoning plan for the county, those concerned about the land-use regulations spoke out against government controlling their property and feared it will drive up the cost of housing in the county. Supporters tired of growth "rapidly getting out of control" in the county looked to the zoning plan to help manage problems like growing traffic congestion and the spread of adult entertainment businesses.
NEWS
August 6, 2007
The National Park Service will conduct required dam inspections for Potomac River Dams No. 4 and No. 5 on Wednesday, according to a park service press release. Water will be lowered behind the dams to permit the inspections by National Park Service and Bureau of Reclamation personnel. Water levels will be noticeably lower for 24 to 48 hours, according to the release. Periodic inspections are required by the National Park Service to ensure the proper maintenance of the dams, and the safety of people and property downstream.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 21, 2007
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.VA.-A lack of rainfall this summer prompted the Shepherdstown Water Department on Friday to ask customers to voluntarily conserve water. Other public utility providers said Friday they might follow suit if dry conditions continue much longer. "We went all winter with very little precipitation, really," said Chris Hutzler, assistant superintendent of Shepherdstown's water department. Water levels in the town's storage tanks have dropped dramatically this summer because of recent high usage, which has caused intermittent pressure problems for customers, Hutzler said.
NEWS
By ASHLEY HARTMAN | July 21, 2007
WAYNESBORO, PA.-The Washington Township meeting room was packed Wednesday night, and it wasn't for a township supervisors meeting. Representatives of Corporate Office Properties Trust, Fort Ritchie (COPT) and PenMar Development Corp. attended an Antietam Watershed Association meeting to discuss and answer questions related to the redevelopment of Fort Ritchie and its impact on the Falls Creek area. Falls Creek is a major tributary to the Antietam Watershed. Citizens addressed their questions to Bill Hofmann, senior property and environmental services manager for COPT, and Rich Rook, executive director of PenMar Development Corp.
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