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NEWS
September 23, 2011
Multiple streets in Hagerstown have reopened after being subject to closure the past two weeks for lining of wastewater mains in the area. One lane of the 100 and 200 blocks of West Franklin Street had been closed earlier this week, and West Church Street was subject to lane closures between South Potomac Street and Jonathan Street. Crews from Miller Pipeline were lining the wastewater mains in those areas, according to the City of Hagerstown's website, www.hagerstownmd.org . Similar work was done over the past two weeks on Cleveland Avenue, East Baltimore Street, Radcliffe Avenue, East Antietam Street and Manor Drive.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | June 7, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com A power outage caused by Wednesday's storm resulted in the flow of 18,000 to 175,000 gallons of wastewater that had not been disinfected into Antietam Creek, a City of Hagerstown official said Thursday. The sewage treatment plant off Frederick Street lost power at about 5:15 p.m. and regained power about an hour later, said Scott Shadrach, plant operations and maintenance supervisor. At the time the power went out, an average of 175,000 gallons per hour was flowing through the plant, he said.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | November 9, 2004
FUNKSTOWN - Funkstown Assistant Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. on Monday said engineers are working on blueprints for the new wastewater treatment plant and that Town Council members will meet before the next monthly meeting to look over its progress. "We have a long way to go until the project's done," he said. The comment followed a discussion about funding for the plant. Crampton said the town has submitted applications for many grants and isn't likely to hear whether the town has received them until the start of the next fiscal year.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | September 5, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - When Gary Rohrer was asked to revise Washington County's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance, designed to collect fees for schools and roads in high-growth areas, he said he was "somewhat surprised by the volume of activity" of development in the county. Trying to calculate fees to cover the costs of keeping up with development proved a challenge. "It's almost impossible to quantify the cumulative effect," Rohrer said.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
An ongoing wastewater pipeline-replacement project will cause some interruptions in service for Hagerstown residents, according to the city's website. Work was taking place in the area of the MELP plant on Wednesday, the website said. When contacted for comment, city Utilities Director Michael S. Spiker responded via email, citing information from the website. Many of Hagerstown's wastewater pipes are made of clay and are more than 50 years old, which has led to  disrepair and structural defects.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | July 23, 2013
A Pennsylvania company is the apparent low bidder for construction of the City of Martinsburg's wastewater treatment plant project. HRI Inc., of State College, Pa., bid $43,244,800, City Manager Mark Baldwin announced Tuesday at a city council-as-a-whole committee meeting. Baldwin said the bid by HRI came in about $4.5 million higher than the estimated construction cost. HRI was one of six companies to submit bids, the highest being more than $51 million. HRI's bid, as well as several bid alternatives for the treatment plant project, now will be reviewed as part of an effort to close the gap between the estimated cost and the actual bid results, Baldwin said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 8, 2011
An "odor scrubber" will be installed at Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District's wastewater treatment plant along Scrabble Road as part an ongoing effort to remove a persistent stench. Sewer district General Manager Curtis B. Keller said this week that he hopes to have the equipment installed where the sewage flows into the plant facility by this fall. The project, which could cost as much as $10,000 or more, comes after the sewer district tried less expensive options, including chemicals, to try to mitigate the odor, Keller said.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | September 21, 2004
tarar@herald-mail.com The towns of Boonsboro and Funkstown and the City of Hagerstown have asked Washington County to amend its water and sewer plan to allow for future growth of the municipalities' wastewater treatment facilities. The Washington County Commissioners and the Washington County Planning Commission held a public hearing on the requests Monday night. County Senior Planner Tim Lung said Maryland law requires that counties rule that such requests are consistent with county water and sewer plans before state agencies may issue any permits for the construction or the extension of any public water and sewage facilities.
NEWS
by WANDA T. WILLIAMS | March 8, 2005
BOONSBORO - The Boonsboro Town Council on Monday approved plans to design a new $5.4 million wastewater treatment plant and public works facility. The Maryland Department of Environment has approved the new plant, which will remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the town's wastewater, said Kevin Chambers, chairman of the Boonsboro Utilities Commission. Reducing nitrogen and phosphorus helps preserve and protect the Chesapeake Bay, town officials said Monday night. The town's existing wastewater treatment system isn't equipped to remove biological nutrients, preventing the town from meeting state requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus levels, Chambers said.
NEWS
April 24, 2008
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski, both D-Md., today announced $9.3 million in new funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development program for improvements to the Town of Boonsboro's two wastewater treatment plants. The funding will help bring Boonsboro's wastewater systems into compliance with regulations established by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE). One wastewater system is owned and operated by Fahrney-Keedy Memorial Home, a nonprofit organization providing nursing home care to approximately 360 residents.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2013
Contractors continue to work on upgrading Waynesboro's wastewater treatment plant as they eye a spring 2014 completion for the $10.2 million project. The wastewater treatment plant was built in the 1930s and last upgraded in the 1980s, according to Jon Fleagle, chairman of the Waynesboro Borough Authority. The Waynesboro Borough Council received an update on the project Tuesday evening from Fleagle and Leiter Pryor, the borough's director of utilities. The borough's 5,500 sewer customers had rate increases each year since 2010 to fund the project.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | July 23, 2013
A Pennsylvania company is the apparent low bidder for construction of the City of Martinsburg's wastewater treatment plant project. HRI Inc., of State College, Pa., bid $43,244,800, City Manager Mark Baldwin announced Tuesday at a city council-as-a-whole committee meeting. Baldwin said the bid by HRI came in about $4.5 million higher than the estimated construction cost. HRI was one of six companies to submit bids, the highest being more than $51 million. HRI's bid, as well as several bid alternatives for the treatment plant project, now will be reviewed as part of an effort to close the gap between the estimated cost and the actual bid results, Baldwin said.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
A Williamsport wastewater treatment plant pump station near the C&O Canal tow path failed earlier this week, spilling a “small amount” of sewage just south of the Cushwa Basin, according to Williamsport Mayor James G. McCleaf II. The mayor, who had few details about the incident when reached for comment Wednesday night, confirmed the incident near Lock 44 of the C&O Canal. The spill took place two days ago and since has been cleaned up, he said. McCleaf said the area, which is just off Lockwood Road near the Potomac River, remains cordoned off with yellow caution tape at this time, in accordance with regulations governing wastewater spills.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | August 9, 2012
The City of Hagerstown is in the process of relining the existing wastewater main in the area of Burhans Boulevard at Antietam Street, according to Michael Spiker, the city's director of utilities. Temporary pipes are being used as a bypass for the wastewater that normally would flow through the permanent pipes that have been placed along the eastern side of Burhans Boulevard and loop around the bottom of the railroad overpass on Antietam Street, Spiker said in an email. The pipes have been in place for more than a month, according to the email.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
Funkstown officials agreed to explore the possibility of getting solar panels built near the town's wastewater treatment plant, a project that could reduce the town's electrical costs for the plant. At Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr.'s request, Phil Kelly with Millennium 3 Energy made a presentation during Monday night's Town Council meeting about a possible solar panel project. Kelly said the town would not pay for installation of the solar panels, but would reap the lower cost of electricity than what the town is paying Potomac Edison.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
An ongoing wastewater pipeline-replacement project will cause some interruptions in service for Hagerstown residents, according to the city's website. Work was taking place in the area of the MELP plant on Wednesday, the website said. When contacted for comment, city Utilities Director Michael S. Spiker responded via email, citing information from the website. Many of Hagerstown's wastewater pipes are made of clay and are more than 50 years old, which has led to  disrepair and structural defects.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
The 200 and 300 blocks of Cleveland Avenue could still see closures this week due to sewer relining work by Miller Pipeline, according to the City of Hagerstown's wastewater page, http://www.hagerstownmd.org/Utilities/Wastewater.html . Crews from Miller Pipeline began working on wastewater mains in District 7 of Hagerstown, which is in the vicinity of Cleveland Avenue, on Sept. 28. Traffic has slowed down in that area periodically. Miller Pipeline is also still working on wastewater mains in District 8, which is in the vicinity of 25-68 Church St. and 130-231 W. Franklin St. Work there began Sept.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
West Franklin Street reopened Tuesday afternoon in Hagerstown after being closed earlier in the day for lining of wastewater mains in the area, according to the City of Hagerstown's website, www.hagerstownmd.org . The left lane of the 100 and 200 blocks of West Franklin Street had closed earlier Tuesday, backing up traffic. Crews from Miller Pipeline were lining the wastewater mains on the street, according to the City of Hagerstown. Similar work was done over the past two weeks on West Church Street, Cleveland Avenue, East Baltimore Street, Radcliffe Avenue, East Antietam Street and Manor Drive.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Multiple streets in Hagerstown have reopened after being subject to closure the past two weeks for lining of wastewater mains in the area. One lane of the 100 and 200 blocks of West Franklin Street had been closed earlier this week, and West Church Street was subject to lane closures between South Potomac Street and Jonathan Street. Crews from Miller Pipeline were lining the wastewater mains in those areas, according to the City of Hagerstown's website, www.hagerstownmd.org . Similar work was done over the past two weeks on Cleveland Avenue, East Baltimore Street, Radcliffe Avenue, East Antietam Street and Manor Drive.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 8, 2011
An "odor scrubber" will be installed at Berkeley County Public Service Sewer District's wastewater treatment plant along Scrabble Road as part an ongoing effort to remove a persistent stench. Sewer district General Manager Curtis B. Keller said this week that he hopes to have the equipment installed where the sewage flows into the plant facility by this fall. The project, which could cost as much as $10,000 or more, comes after the sewer district tried less expensive options, including chemicals, to try to mitigate the odor, Keller said.
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