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Washington Township

NEWS
July 9, 2013
The Franklin County Planning Department received 10 applications for its fiscal 2013 Community Development Block Grant Program, county commissioners learned at a public hearing last week. The Community Development Block Program provides communities with resources to address a wide range of community development needs, including low- to moderate-income project, an urgent need and slum or blighted areas. Since 2008, Franklin County has allocated 73 percent of the funding to public infrastructure projects that benefit low- to moderate-income areas, according to a news release from the planning department.
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NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | July 5, 2013
Before 2008, few people knew about the Battle of Monterey Pass in Blue Ridge Summit. Washington Township, Pa., historian John Miller said the Gettysburg campaign has received all of the attention over the years, but the Battle of Monterey, fought on July 4 and 5, 1863, is no less important. On Friday, Friends of the Monterey Pass Battlefield Inc. members, and state and local dignitaries dedicated a marker to commemorate the second-largest Civil War battle in Pennsylvania. “This is a milestone in the community,” Miller said.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | June 15, 2013
As part of the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the Allison-Antrim Museum in Greencastle hosted five nationally recognized Civil War speakers on Saturday. Ted Alexander, chief historian at Antietam National Battlefield, presented “Military Units of Franklin County in the Civil War.” Diseases such as measles and chickenpox could kill you back then, Alexander told those who assembled in the barn behind the museum to listen to his talk. “Diseases quickly whittled down a regiment,” he said.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
The Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors are expected to soon decide whether they want to lower the municipality's traffic impact fees, as  recommended by a committee tasked with reviewing the fee structure. If the supervisors decide at their Monday meeting to lower the fees, the amended rate would be advertised and put in effect for land development projects submitted after July 6. The committee, mostly comprised of real estate professionals, recommended the rate be lowered from $3,147 for each “traffic unit” to $2,485 per unit.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 12, 2013
Washington Township is installing a sewer main along Calimer Drive as it continues to seek funding for the project. Through federal Community Development Block Grants, the township supervisors and municipal authority are providing sewer connections to homes in a lower-income section of the community. They have already connected five properties on Old Forge Road to the public system. Washington Township received $100,000 in 2010, $75,000 in 2011 and $75,000 in 2012. It is submitting an application for the 2013 round of CDBG funding, which is funneled through the county.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 9, 2013
Will Manning knew nothing of the Battle of Monterey Pass before he started his Eagle Scout project, but 80 hours of work on an informational sign for the battlefield filled in the blanks. Will, 15, built a wooden sign with informative text and images to help visitors understand what happened during the mountaintop Civil War battle. The 4-by-8-foot sign at Monterey Pass Battlefield Park off Pa. 16 in Blue Ridge Summit describes what happened there on the night of July 4, 1863. Last week, Will joined his father, John, and Washington Township, Pa., officials in commemorating his contribution to the municipal-owned battlefield park.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 6, 2013
Washington Township (Pa.) Police Officer Stephen Shannon received citations Thursday, but they were vastly different than the criminal ones he hands out through the Pennsylvania Aggressive Driving Enforcement and Education Project. Shannon received citations from state Rep. Todd Rock, R-Franklin, and state Sen. Richard Alloway II, R-Franklin/Adams/York, for his efforts to crack down on aggressive driving. He also received recognition from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2013
The Washington Township, Pa., supervisors on Monday quashed changes that would have allowed chickens to be kept in low-density residential zones.  The supervisors unanimously decided to halt efforts to allow chickens on R1 properties. However, they still intend to continue with an initiative to allow hens in forest conservation zones. Supervisor Dick McCracken made a motion to rescind action taken May 20, saying he was confused by what the earlier vote meant. Chickens are currently prohibited in R1 zones, but the earlier vote had authorized staff to prepare legal documents to start allowing them.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 29, 2013
Plans to allow chickens in select residential areas of Washington Township, Pa., hit a snag this week. Washington Township Supervisor Dick McCracken told his fellow board members Wednesday that he misunderstood the meaning of his May 20 vote. A 3-2 vote that night authorized municipal staff to develop the legal documents necessary to start allowing chickens in R1 (low-density residential) zones under certain conditions. McCracken voted in favor of that motion, but he said Wednesday he is actually opposed to the concept.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 20, 2013
The flap over chickens continued Monday in Washington Township, Pa., where township supervisors took steps toward allowing hens in backyard coops. Debate about changing an existing prohibition of chickens in most zones lasted an hour during the Washington Township Supervisors meeting. Ultimately, the supervisors decided to start the process to allow chickens in R1 (low-density residential) and forest conservation zones if certain requirements are met. The potential changes to the zoning regulations would be the subject of a public hearing before they could be fully adopted.
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