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NEWS
February 26, 2012
Local historian Roger Keller will present “Maryland and the War of 1812” Friday, March 9, at 6 p.m. at the Boonsboro Library. The library also will host the “War of 1812 Traveling Exhibit” from March 5 to 29. The exhibit is made available through the Baltimore National Heritage Area and is available for viewing Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, go to www.whilbr.org/SharpsburgMilitia1812/index.aspx ...
NEWS
July 27, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The House on Tuesday sent President Obama a major war-funding increase of $33 billion to pay for his troop surge in Afghanistan, unmoved by the leaking of classified documents that portray a military effort struggling between 2004 and 2009 against a strengthening insurgency. The House voted, 308-114, to approve the spending boost for the additional 30,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Other non-war provisions brought the total bill to nearly $59 billion. From Obama on down, the disclosure of the documents was condemned by administration officials and military leaders on Tuesday, but the material failed to stir new anti-war sentiment.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | March 1, 2013
When the news came that Rachel Maddow had written a book based upon a long study of our wars and the consequences, there was little delay in the purchase and reading. Those who have watched her display of talents, energy, brilliance and grasp of world events will recognize her gifts as a writer in “Drift.” The subtitle, “The Unmooring of American Military Power,” suggests the tone of her well-documented story. What follows is a chronological unveiling of the expansion of our armed forces from a citizen army to a mammoth military complex with units and equipment scattered over the globe.
NEWS
April 27, 2013
The Maryland Humanities Council will present David Hildebrand in a concert of “Music of the War of 1812 in America,” Sunday, May 19, at 4 p.m. in St. Mark's Fellowship Center, 18313 Lappans Road, Boonsboro.  The War of 1812 spawned a huge variety of songs in America. From the early stirrings of party politics under President Adams, the traumatic effect of Jefferson's Embargo in 1807, the triumph at Fort McHenry to the last battle in New Orleans, Americans took pen to paper to tear at political opponents, to dramatize the great sea battles between huge frigates in full sail and to laud battle heroes like Hull and Perry.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | April 20, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com While some pastors in the Tri-State area plan to weave the hostilities in Iraq into their Easter sermons today, most will deliver traditional messages of hope, resurrection and redemption. "We have addressed current events the past few weeks in our congregation," said the Rev. Harold Shenk of Hebron Mennonite Church in Paramount. "On Easter Sunday, I plan to preach a traditional Sunday sermon. " Shenk's topic today at the 10 a.m. service is "Shaken by the Resurrection.
NEWS
By ROBERT GARY | August 18, 2007
In a war against a global religio-martial movement, militant Islamist Jihadism, the war must be fought on two fronts: 1. The physical/military front and 2. The metaphysical public relations front. The enemy can lose 90 percent of its manpower on the military field of battle, but if it wins on the public relations front, it can turn around and recruit 200 percent of what it had before. Each cycle, the enemy comes out 210 percent ahead, even if we kill or neutralize nine out of 10. While we are winning the fight on the ground, we are actually losing the war because our foes are growing at an exponential rate.
NEWS
By ROBERT GARY | October 7, 2007
In the future, Americans should only enter into those wars that the people of this democratic republic truly want. How could this be arranged? Congresspersons are at least somewhat sensitive to how they are regarded by their constituents. They try to avoid taking positions that are abhorrent to the great majority of voters in their districts. OK then, here's how to ensure that future wars won't arise out of a cabal of Texas oilmen, or the confused brain of a less-than-perfectly-smart president or the boardrooms of some huge corporations in the government services contracting business.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | March 27, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com Washington County educators are fielding questions from students about the war instead of teaching about it in a school system effort to keep classes as normal as possible. Leigh Green, who teaches United States history to eighth-graders at Springfield Middle School, said she doesn't bring up the war, but she has had to answer some questions about presidential powers, weapons being used in combat and the differences between biological and chemical weapons.
NEWS
December 8, 2007
To the editor: Many have speculated what will happen if Rep. Ron Paul is not elected president. The obvious answer is that nothing will change; that is, nothing regarding our present circumstances will change and most likely will only get worse. So, by eliminating the fact that there are no good alternative candidates in the event that Ron Paul is not our next president, we will need to focus on our nation's future degradation that will result from the continuation of the neoconservatives' status-quo of legislative and foreign policies - regardless of which party wins the presidency.
NEWS
November 9, 2001
IRS could be the news dogs of war Like everyone else, I was sitting around yesterday waiting for us to hang bin Laden from the highest yardarm when the bulletin flashed across the wire that the U.S. had, in dramatic fashion, "frozen terrorists' assets. " Next I heard the dispatch that the Federal Bureau of Investigation had "grounded all crop dusters. " Then I saw the story that the Republican-controlled House of Representatives had voted to pay all of America's back dues to the United Nations.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | September 2, 2013
It took two big grills to cook the 250 steaks and another one for the 175 slices of country ham to feed the crowd of more than 400 people at Monday's annual Labor Day breakfast at War Memorial Park in Martinsburg. Harold Catrow, a volunteer at the event, said it  was the 41st year for the event, which has become a standard fundraiser to benefit the park. Bonn A. “Buzz” Poland, another longtime breakfast volunteer, said an average profit each year runs between $8,000 and $10,000.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | August 30, 2013
A man charged in the shooting a man and a girl during Fourth of July festivities at a Martinsburg park last year is on schedule to be tried on remaining charges in the case next week.  Daniel Lee Herbert, 29, was indicted in October 2012 on two counts of attempted murder, three counts of malicious assault, five counts of wanton endangerment, and single counts of felon in possession of a firearm and fleeing on foot from a law enforcement officer.  ...
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 22, 2013
The remains of U.S. Army private from Hagerstown who died of malnutrition as a prisoner of war during the Korean War are scheduled to be returned home this weekend and buried in Rest Haven Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon, officials said. Heren Blevins was wounded in the arm and taken prisoner in the Chosin Reservoir on Dec. 2, 1950, when elements of the 7th Infantry Division were overrun by Chinese communists. The 19-year-old soldier was taken to a prison camp that the captives dubbed “Death Valley.” Some of his fellow prisoners of war who were repatriated after the war told military officials that Blevins died of malnutrition in January 1951.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 16, 2013
The nation's largest Civil War battlefield preservation group has been awarded $90,000 to help save a site near Williamsport that saw action as Confederate troops retreated from the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863, officials said. The Maryland Heritage Areas Authority awarded the money to the Civil War Trust, one of 58 grants totaling $2.7 million that went to Maryland nonprofit organizations. Of that amount, $360,415 went to local heritage tourism sites, activities and organizations in Washington, Frederick and Carroll counties.  The authority gives grants to expand tourism-related job creation in the state, according to Tom Riford, president and chief executive officer of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 11, 2013
As Civil War re-enactors portraying Confederate soldiers were leaving a mock battlefield at Renfrew Park on Sunday afternoon, Zachary “Zach” Gagliardi stopped one to ask questions about the flag used in the generic battle re-enactment. The 12-year-old said he has learned quite a bit about the Civil War by visiting the Waynesboro encampment for several years. He can tell you about various models of bayonets and the way rifles took over for muskets in fighting. “Every year we learn something new,” said his mother, Tina Gagliardi.
LIFESTYLE
By TERESA DUNHAM CAVAGNARO | Special to The Herald-Mail | August 8, 2013
A documentary film with local ties brought home a prestigious Emmy Award earlier this summer. The film, “Maryland's Heart of the Civil War,” earned its Emmy recognition from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences at a ceremony in mid-June in Baltimore. The historical documentary explores the Civil War's impact on the landscape and personal lives of Marylanders in the area that is being called the Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area - which includes Washington, Frederick, and Carroll counties - by combining scenic shots and re-enactments with compelling commentaries from respected historians.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 6, 2013
Pvt. Heren Blevins met the beginning of his end on Dec. 2, 1950, when the former Hagerstown resident was captured at the Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. Military records indicate Blevins was wounded in the arm and taken prisoner when elements of the 7th Infantry Division were overrun by Chinese communists. The 19-year-old soldier was taken to a prison camp that the captives dubbed “Death Valley.” Some of his fellow prisoners of war who were repatriated after the war told military officials that Blevins died of malnutrition in January 1951.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association elected its new officers for the 2013-14 year at its annual meeting July 3. The new officers are Les Bishop, commander; Pat Patterson, vice commander; Ron Twenty, second vice commander; Charlie Morris, secretary; and Jim Mobley, treasurer. The following members were appointed to fill the other officer positions in the chapter: Carl Paylor, judge advocate; Dick Sayles, sergeant-at-arms; Dr. Bud Johns, chaplain; and Clayton Burkholder, historian.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Marvin S. Mann Sr. of Hagerstown celebrated his 90th birthday with a large family party on July 20 at the home of his son, Mark Mann, of Hagerstown. Forty family members and friends were in attendance with an “American Hero” theme, which highlighted his service during the German and Japanese theaters in 1945.  Mann reminisced and shared pictures with his special guest and fellow veteran, Guy Whidden of Frederick, Md. Whidden and his family are the authors of the book “Between the Lines and Beyond.” Marvin Mann was a sergeant in the Army's 322nd Medical Battalion and received a letter of recommendation for the Bronze Star Medal.
EDUCATION
July 28, 2013
Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association awarded two $500 scholarships to local students. The awards were given at the chapter's annual meeting July 3. This year's winners were Natalie Rudisill of Williamsport High School and Sean G. Kreps of Clear Spring High School. Rudisill will attend University of Maryland, Baltimore County and major in engineering. Kreps plans to attend West Chester University and major in premed-anesthesiology. The awards were made by scholarship chairman Joe Startari and Commander Les Bishop.
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