Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsWal Mart Bill
IN THE NEWS

Wal Mart Bill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 12, 2006
One of the items the Maryland General Assembly is expected to take up today is the governor's veto of the so-called Wal-Mart bill. The bill mandates that firms with more than 10,000 employees spend at least 8 percent of payroll on health-care insurance. Under that definition, in Maryland only Wal-Mart would be affected. There has been a split in the business community statewide on this bill, with some business owners who feel their stores have been undercut by Wal-Mart backing the bill.
NEWS
January 7, 2006
When the General Assembly considers Governor Ehrlich's veto of the Wal-Mart bill this Wednesday (January 11), the vote will be about leadership in Annapolis and understanding what businesses need here at home. The Wal-Mart bill is poorly crafted, sets a dangerous precedent, and does little to provide health care for Washington County's uninsured. Our delegation to Annapolis should understand this and vote to sustain the Governor's veto. The facts about the Wal-Mart bill have not changed.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Wal-Mart bill does very little for health care To the editor: Matthew Celentano's letter to the editor on April 10 reads like "Alice in Wonderland. " He does not make one factual or truthful statement in the entire letter and only brings discredit upon himself, the liberal leadership in the legislature and John Donoghue. If he is going to put a spin on the subject, at least don't insult the readers with distortions and misrepresentations that are so obvious. To call the "Wal-Mart bill" pro-business with broad-based business support from across the state, both large and small, is ludicrous.
NEWS
January 12, 2006
So much for bipartisanship. That's our reaction after reading the comments Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller made on Tuesday. Miller, speaking about the 2006 session that opens today, said that the first order of business will be to declare "Independence Day" and override the governor's vetoes of the so-called Wal-Mart bill and a bill to increase the state's minimum wage. OK, then. On both those bills, there are arguments for the overrides that can be made by people of good faith.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | January 11, 2006
ANNAPOLIS tammyb@herald-mail.com If there were any question about the top priority of legislative Democrats during this year's General Assembly, Senate President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller cleared it up Tuesday afternoon. First order of business after the assembly convenes today is to "declare Independence Day" on Thursday, when the Senate expects to consider overrides of Gov. Robert Ehrlich's vetoes from last year - including the Fair Share Health Care Act, which would force large employers to contribute 8 percent or more of payroll on health care, and a bill to increase the minimum wage.
NEWS
August 10, 2007
When U.S. Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., visited Hagerstown this week, he backed the idea of a law that would require everyone who could afford it to purchase health insurance. Those who didn't comply would pay a tax, which would be used to purchase insurance for those who don't do so voluntarily. If Cardin's plan sounds familiar, it's because it's based on one enacted in Massachusetts in 2006. In a May 2006 interview in The Herald-Mail, Cardin said, "I think Massachusetts has given us a way out. " Under a new Massachusetts law, by July 1, 2007, every citizen was required to purchase health insurance, just, as The Washington Post noted in April 2006, every driver must have car insurance.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | January 18, 2006
Is it just me, or does the cheerleading being done by Maryland's top Democrats, including Senate President Mike Miller, have an air of desperation about it? On Jan. 10, Miller said that the lawmakers' first order of business would be to override Republican Gov. Robert Ehrlich's veto of the so-called Wal-Mart bill. Then, Miller said, Democrats will go after Ehrlich - and any other Republican they can whip - until election day when the state's Dems will all sing "Happy Days Are Here Again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2007
When U.S. Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., visited Hagerstown this week, he backed the idea of a law that would require everyone who could afford it to purchase health insurance. Those who didn't comply would pay a tax, which would be used to purchase insurance for those who don't do so voluntarily. If Cardin's plan sounds familiar, it's because it's based on one enacted in Massachusetts in 2006. In a May 2006 interview in The Herald-Mail, Cardin said, "I think Massachusetts has given us a way out. " Under a new Massachusetts law, by July 1, 2007, every citizen was required to purchase health insurance, just, as The Washington Post noted in April 2006, every driver must have car insurance.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 2, 2006
Bill did nothing for worker care To the editor: Reno Hetzel makes two valid points in his April 21 letter to the editor. The first point, however, he answers himself. He did not "hear my voice" about the plight of the uninsured worker because the Wal-Mart bill does absolutely nothing to address that, nor does it even give one additional person the benefit of health insurance. That is one of the glaring faults of the Wal-Mart bill. My business associate and I ran a small business for 38 years through some very difficult times, but I am proud to say that health insurance was available to our employees for every single day of those 38 years.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | March 15, 2006
Love him or hate him - and there are many in both camps - few will deny that when Paul Muldowney served in the Maryland House of Delegates from 1978-86, he was one of the area's most effective legislators. After setting up a campaign committee last September to explore another run against Del. John Donoghue, D-Washington, Muldowney made it official last week. His decision to seek the District 2C seat was preceded by numerous contacts with local leaders of the Republican Party, which he joined two years after losing to Donoghue in the 1998 Democratic primary by fewer than 300 votes.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | January 18, 2006
Is it just me, or does the cheerleading being done by Maryland's top Democrats, including Senate President Mike Miller, have an air of desperation about it? On Jan. 10, Miller said that the lawmakers' first order of business would be to override Republican Gov. Robert Ehrlich's veto of the so-called Wal-Mart bill. Then, Miller said, Democrats will go after Ehrlich - and any other Republican they can whip - until election day when the state's Dems will all sing "Happy Days Are Here Again.
NEWS
January 12, 2006
So much for bipartisanship. That's our reaction after reading the comments Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller made on Tuesday. Miller, speaking about the 2006 session that opens today, said that the first order of business will be to declare "Independence Day" and override the governor's vetoes of the so-called Wal-Mart bill and a bill to increase the state's minimum wage. OK, then. On both those bills, there are arguments for the overrides that can be made by people of good faith.
NEWS
January 12, 2006
One of the items the Maryland General Assembly is expected to take up today is the governor's veto of the so-called Wal-Mart bill. The bill mandates that firms with more than 10,000 employees spend at least 8 percent of payroll on health-care insurance. Under that definition, in Maryland only Wal-Mart would be affected. There has been a split in the business community statewide on this bill, with some business owners who feel their stores have been undercut by Wal-Mart backing the bill.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | January 11, 2006
ANNAPOLIS tammyb@herald-mail.com If there were any question about the top priority of legislative Democrats during this year's General Assembly, Senate President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller cleared it up Tuesday afternoon. First order of business after the assembly convenes today is to "declare Independence Day" on Thursday, when the Senate expects to consider overrides of Gov. Robert Ehrlich's vetoes from last year - including the Fair Share Health Care Act, which would force large employers to contribute 8 percent or more of payroll on health care, and a bill to increase the minimum wage.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|