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Wagon Train

NEWS
May 18, 2008
The Washington County segment of the 20th annual National Pike Festival and Wagon Train began Friday night with an encampment at Plumb Grove in Clear Spring. Activities continue today as the wagon train culminates a 36-mile trip from Clear Spring to Boonsboro on Alternate U.S. 40. The following is a schedule of today's events associated with the festival. All wagon train times are approximate. Yard sales are set up along the wagon train's route. 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. -- Ralph Henderson Ag Center, 510 E. Wilson Blvd.
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NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | September 14, 2004
FUNKSTOWN - Former Wagon Train committee member Tom Wetzel addressed the Funkstown Mayor and Town Council on Monday, saying that a message regarding the wagon train left on his cell phone did not say to stay away from the town. The wagon train usually spends a night in Funkstown, but did not do so this year. Laura Bowman, chairwoman of the National Pike Festival and president of the James Shaull Wagon Train Foundation, said at last month's council meeting that Wetzel had received a voice-mail message that said "not to come" into Funkstown's park.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | August 18, 2004
pepperb@herald-mail.com FUNKSTOWN - The National Pike Festival wagon train did not spend a night in Funkstown this year because of a phone message the event's coordinator said steered her away from the town. Laura Bowman, chairwoman of the National Pike Festival and president of the James Shaull Wagon Train Foundation, met with the Funkstown mayor and Town Council Monday to discuss why the wagon train did not stay in Funkstown as planned during the May festival. She said Washington County's portion of this year's National Pike Festival changed on the afternoon of the event.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | May 18, 2012
For the past 23 years, a horse-drawn wagon train about a quarter-mile long has snaked its way down Old National Pike from Clear Spring and into downtown Hagerstown on its way to Boonsboro. It's surely a sight to see, according to Peggy Mason of Martinsburg, W.Va., “because it's something many have never seen before.” Peggy Mason will ride with her husband, Norman, as the 24th annual National Pike Festival kicks off this morning with its wagon train ride that travels along the historic path.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | May 20, 2000
Saturday's rain couldn't stop the wagon train, but it affected several other National Pike Festival-related activities in Washington County. A parade in Clear Spring was canceled because of the rain. But scores of people still came out for the activities at Clear Spring High School, which included craft sales, an Indian dance exhibition and refreshments presented by the school band. The bad weather also kept many people away from the first day of the Boonsboro Founders Day festival at Shafer Park.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | May 18, 2006
CLEAR SPRING - The National Pike Festival wagon train will have an extra travel companion this year to record stories about the event and local history, coordinator Laura Bowman said. Liz Hand, a writer and substitute history teacher from Pennsylvania, will ride along, interviewing participants about the wagon train and their own history farming with mules and draft horses, Bowman said. The wagon train is expected to leave Clear Spring by 9 a.m. Saturday and arrive in Boonsboro around 2 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | May 22, 2006
BOONSBORO - About 100 people with 30 horses and 14 wagons set out Saturday to travel 32 miles from Clear Spring to Boonsboro. They arrived Sunday afternoon, completing the 18th annual National Pike Festival & Wagon Train. Washington County was the only Maryland county to celebrate the 300-mile route with an authentic wagon train and other activities, said Laura Bowman, event coordinator. Bowman is president of the James Shaull Wagon Train Foundation Inc., one of the event's sponsors.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 16, 2008
CLEAR SPRING -- In the days before the word infrastructure was coined, moving produce and raw materials east and finished goods and settlers west was more travail then travel. The Baltimore-National Pike did not extend beyond Frederick County, so the job of opening up the western part of Maryland fell to a group of bankers willing to make the investment to build the road out to Cumberland, Md., to promote commerce. That was at the end of the 18th century, and it was the early years of the 19th century before the road was laid, said Jack Pinnell of Hagerstown, one of the coordinators of the National Pike Festival.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | May 17, 2007
CLEAR SPRING - After driving her own team of horses in 2005 and helping to drive a team last year that pulled her family in a covered wagon, this year 10-year-old Jo Baker will ride solo - on horseback - during National Pike Festival's 32-mile wagon train this weekend. The Big Pool girl is handing the reins to the team of Percherons to her younger sister, Adriana, 8, says their father, Jamie Baker. The Baker family has been involved with wagon train events for seven years.
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