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NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 20, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - School boards constantly make decisions that affect students, but rarely are students given a voice, North Hagerstown High School junior Kate Zimmer said. "We're the ones who are impacted," she said. Kate, 17, said when she decided to run for an office on the Maryland Association of Student Councils, part of her platform was advocating for voting rights for student representatives on local boards of education. And when she was elected to the office of first vice president, she was "goofy happy," she said.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 19, 2007
HAGERSTOWN School boards constantly make decisions that affect students, but rarely are students given a voice, North Hagerstown High School junior Kate Zimmer said. "We're the ones who are impacted," she said. Kate, 17, said when she decided to run for an office on the Maryland Association of Student Councils, part of her platform was advocating for voting rights for student representatives on local boards of education. And when she was elected to the office of first vice president, she was "goofy happy," she said.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | March 29, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com A measure that would restore the voting rights of repeat felons after they serve their time was tentatively approved Thursday by the Maryland Senate after Republicans tried unsuccessfully to weaken the bill. Under current law, someone who is convicted once of a felony can register to vote after serving their sentence. But someone who is convicted two times is barred from ever voting, making Maryland one of only 13 states to limit felons' voting rights.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | July 25, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com As a vote it means nothing, but when Brian Williamson raises his hand on an issue the Washington County Board of Education will note it. Student members on the county's School Board do not have a formal vote, but Williamson asked in his first business meeting Tuesday night that the School Board acknowledge his opinion on voted items even if it doesn't count toward the tally. Board members agreed. School Board President Bernadette M. Wagner counted the members' votes on each issue before checking to see if Williamson gave his approval.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 10, 2011
A year full of frustrations and fulfilling moments is how Steven Wang described his time as the student representative to the Washington County Board of Education. Wang, 18, said he thinks students are still left out of the loop in many regards. He said he’s confident the seven elected board members value students’ input, “but it’s difficult when you only meet with the board members two times per month and there isn’t this type of back-and-forth dialogue.” Student board members are not permitted to attend closed sessions and do not have voting rights, although Wang occasionally voiced an opinion or raised a hand during votes to signify where he stood.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | May 19, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Student government representatives from high schools throughout Washington County say the student who sits on the Washington County Board of Education should have partial voting rights. The student representative now offers an opinion, which is entered into the record, but is not a voting member of the board. Students recapped a year of student government service and leadership activities Tuesday during a Board of Education meeting. Students also shared that North Hagerstown High SGA member and Washington County Association of Student Councils (WCASC)
NEWS
April 3, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer, Martinsburg SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - The women's movement as resulted in some of the most widespread changes in society, from the way couples share household duties to the focus on sexual harrassment, said ABC News correspondent Lynn Sherr. "The problem is, it's never over," Sherr said of women's fight for equal rights. One of the biggest examples continues to be women's wages, according to Sherr, who spoke at a women's leaders conference Thursday night at Shepherd College.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | July 7, 2009
BOONSBORO -- Boonsboro's Town Council decided Monday that Councilman Kevin M. Chambers could keep one of his roles on the town's utilities commission after a dispute among council members over Chambers' service on the commission. During the town council's June meeting, two council members, Natalie Mose and Barbara Wetzel, said the town attorney's opinion was that Chambers could not serve as liaison to the Boonsboro Municipal Utilities Commission and chairman of the commission. Town Manager Debra Smith said in a phone interview Monday night that the town's attorney found that Chambers could serve in both roles, but could not vote.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | November 4, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com Voters in the Eastern Panhandle are taking advantage of a new early voting program, prompting some election officials to say it will increase voter turnout in the general election. "This is going over and above whatever we expected," said Lefty Files, a Democratic ballot commissioner for Berkeley County, W.Va. "There is a tremendous number of people coming out of cracks in the walls to vote. " The West Virginia Secretary of State's office this year implemented No Excuse Absentee Voting, which allows residents to cast ballots in person before Election Day. Courthouses in each county began accepting early votes Oct. 21. Residents who want to vote before Tuesday's election still have the option of filling out a ballot from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
June 2, 1997
The battle over a contested seat on the Berkeley County Commission has gotten almost complicated to follow without a crib sheet. Just when we believed it was settled, a citizen group plans to challenge the election a second time. Their challenge comes too late, we believe and West Virginia's highest court should reject it. First, some background: In the November 1996 commisssion election, Republican Howard Strauss beat Democrat Robert Burkhart by 157 votes. Burkhart challenged the election, saying that the West Virginia Constitution says two commissioners cannot be "elected from" the same district, and that Commissioner D. Wayne Dunham lived in Strauss's district at the time of the election.
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OPINION
April 1, 2012
Tuesday, party-affiliated Marylanders go to the polls to choose from among a handful of potential leaders. Here in Western Maryland, most of the attention will be on the 6th District congressional race, which appears to be truly competitive for the first time in two decades. Republican Rep. Roscoe Bartlett is being challenged by a logjam of competitors from his own party, while the Democrats are experiencing a spirited primary of their own. Redistricting is largely responsible for the outpouring of candidates - many who felt they had no chance against the incumbent feel as if they do now, based on new boundary lines.
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 10, 2011
A year full of frustrations and fulfilling moments is how Steven Wang described his time as the student representative to the Washington County Board of Education. Wang, 18, said he thinks students are still left out of the loop in many regards. He said he’s confident the seven elected board members value students’ input, “but it’s difficult when you only meet with the board members two times per month and there isn’t this type of back-and-forth dialogue.” Student board members are not permitted to attend closed sessions and do not have voting rights, although Wang occasionally voiced an opinion or raised a hand during votes to signify where he stood.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | September 13, 2010
o Slide show SMITHSBURG -- Students at Old Forge Elementary School dressed in red, white and blue Monday and participated in a National Anthem Day assembly. The program, held a day before Maryland's primary election, celebrated the Sept. 14 anniversary of Francis Scott Key's writing of the poem that would become the lyrics to "The Star Spangled Banner. " The assembly was held a day earlier because Washington County Public Schools are closed today due to voting. Music teacher Melody Wilson prepared a program of songs and presentations by students to celebrate and highlight our country, the national anthem and the voting rights of Americans.
NEWS
August 25, 2010
Properly placed faith makes a difference To the editor: What a difference faith makes. Properly placed faith, that is. Everyone has faith in something or someone - faith that you will wake up in the morning, that your car will start, that your job will remain, that your good works or contribution of wealth will get you to heaven. But it's the object of faith that matters. Funerals are a good measure of the faith of the departed. True, it's a time of sadness and grief at the loss of a spouse, a parent or a friend, but for those whose faith is securely placed in the only person who ever promised redemption and forgiveness in return for simple, childlike faith in His substitutionery death and resurrection, it is a time of rejoicing.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | July 7, 2009
BOONSBORO -- Boonsboro's Town Council decided Monday that Councilman Kevin M. Chambers could keep one of his roles on the town's utilities commission after a dispute among council members over Chambers' service on the commission. During the town council's June meeting, two council members, Natalie Mose and Barbara Wetzel, said the town attorney's opinion was that Chambers could not serve as liaison to the Boonsboro Municipal Utilities Commission and chairman of the commission. Town Manager Debra Smith said in a phone interview Monday night that the town's attorney found that Chambers could serve in both roles, but could not vote.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | May 19, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Student government representatives from high schools throughout Washington County say the student who sits on the Washington County Board of Education should have partial voting rights. The student representative now offers an opinion, which is entered into the record, but is not a voting member of the board. Students recapped a year of student government service and leadership activities Tuesday during a Board of Education meeting. Students also shared that North Hagerstown High SGA member and Washington County Association of Student Councils (WCASC)
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | October 22, 2007
GREENCASTLE, PA. - Justine Greenwood and Katy Hagberg are not old enough to vote, but they recognize the importance of doing so. "Young people need to be more aware of the topics that are going on in society," Justine said, "because we didn't always have the voting rights, especially women. " The pair signed up for a Greencastle-Antrim High School civics class not only because it is required, but also because they have an emerging, genuine interest in government. "I took it because I don't know anything about government," Justine said.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 20, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - School boards constantly make decisions that affect students, but rarely are students given a voice, North Hagerstown High School junior Kate Zimmer said. "We're the ones who are impacted," she said. Kate, 17, said when she decided to run for an office on the Maryland Association of Student Councils, part of her platform was advocating for voting rights for student representatives on local boards of education. And when she was elected to the office of first vice president, she was "goofy happy," she said.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 19, 2007
HAGERSTOWN School boards constantly make decisions that affect students, but rarely are students given a voice, North Hagerstown High School junior Kate Zimmer said. "We're the ones who are impacted," she said. Kate, 17, said when she decided to run for an office on the Maryland Association of Student Councils, part of her platform was advocating for voting rights for student representatives on local boards of education. And when she was elected to the office of first vice president, she was "goofy happy," she said.
NEWS
by FEDORA COPLEY | March 13, 2007
Turning 18 is exciting and new. You get to buy things that were illegal before, and you also get to vote. Now that you are a mature adult, ready to express your opinion, you can tell your state and country what is important to you. But wait a minute. I hear mature opinions discussed all the time in my ninth-grade classes. Why can't 14- and 15-year-olds vote? I brought this up to my dad. It was obvious to me that there are 15-year-olds out there who are ready and willing to vote.
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