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Voting Machines

NEWS
September 14, 2007
Following are instructions for using voting machines in Washington County. 1. Insert voter access card in the slot at the right of screen. Insert card face up and push the card firmly until it clicks. 2. Touch "Start" to access the ballot. 3. Touch the box next to the candidate or question of your choice. To change or cancel your selection, touch the box again. 4. Touch "Next" to advance the ballot page or touch "Previous" to go back. 5. On the summary page, review your choices.
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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 11, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Officials became frustrated Thursday while discussing how Jefferson County will use new voting equipment in upcoming elections. Jefferson County will use new M-100 counting machines in the primary election next year. The machines will count votes at each precinct and are expected to speed up the tallying process, said Jefferson County Clerk Jennifer Maghan, who oversees county elections. But concerns arose when Maghan explained to the Jefferson County Commission that a metal cart which will be used to carry the M-100 and other electronic voting equipment.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | November 6, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Franklin County will debut $370,000 in new voting machines in Tuesday's general election, which includes races for governor as well as the Pennsylvania and U.S. House of Representatives. The voting machines, which convert paper ballots into computerized forms, were purchased to bring the county into compliance with the Help America Vote Act. Originally purchased for May's primary election, the county was notified by the supplier that they would be using substitute machines in the spring.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | October 17, 2006
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Sitting in front of a white, fold-down table that she calls her desk, Morgan County Clerk Debra Kesecker has an upbeat attitude in the small makeshift office that she shares with a staff member. Kesecker and her staff moved into one of the modular buildings being used as offices for county personnel after a fire destroyed the courthouse and connected buildings Aug. 8. "We were sitting in folding chairs until recently," she said. Purple lace curtains top the windows in the temporary office and her staff of six each works at fold-down tables.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | October 11, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The State Election Commission has approved a loan request by Berkeley County officials for purchasing 155 touch-screen voting machines, County Clerk John W. Small Jr. said Tuesday. The county's application was reviewed by the commission on Sept. 29 and approved, according to a memo from Jason Williams, Secretary of State Betty Ireland's elections division manager, to Berkeley County Commission President Howard L. Strauss, and copied to Small. The loan will pay half of the $480,500 bill for Ivotronic voting machines, which already have been ordered, but will not be available in time for the November election, officials have said.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 21, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Half of the money Berkeley County, W.Va., officials need to convert to touch-screen voting machines for the 2008 elections can not be borrowed from the state's interest-free, revolving loan program, county commissioners were told Thursday. The prospect of paying half of the $480,500 bill for 155 Ivotronic voting machines appeared a bit unsettling to commissioners Howard L. Strauss, Steven C. Teufel and Ronald K. Collins, who last week voted unanimously to make the purchase with a loan to be paid back to the state in five years.
NEWS
June 24, 2006
To the editor: Since the disputed Florida ballot count in the 2000 presidential election, reforming election laws has been on the forefront of issues facing state legislatures across the nation. President Bush in 2002 signed into the law the Help America Vote Act, (HAVA) which placed federal mandates on states, including prohibition on the use of lever and punch-card voting machines and deployment of a statewide voter registration system. Soon, many states, including Georgia, enacted a mandatory identification requirement to protect against voter fraud and voter disenfranchisement.
NEWS
BY DON AINES | May 13, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. Voters going to the polls for Tuesday's primary will fill out their paper ballots the same way they have for the last 18 years, but the way the votes are tabulated will be different, and election officials are expressing confidence in the new equipment. "There was nothing wrong with the equipment we had. In fact, it functioned well for many years," County Commissioner G. Warren Elliott said Friday. The reason the county purchased precinct counters and handicapped-accessible voting machines for all 74 precincts was to comply with the federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA)
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 9, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County officials on Monday wrestled with problems in a new ballot-counting machine and initially said that ballots in today's primary election might have to be counted by hand, a process that could take two days. Jefferson County Clerk Jennifer Maghan said late Monday that the problem had been corrected and she believed that a hand count will not be necessary. Despite Maghan's comments, Jefferson County Commission member Jane Tabb said she thinks a hand count is still possible until the commission assesses the situation.
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