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Voting Machines

NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | March 4, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Extra steps required of poll workers for Tuesday's primary election - the first using touch-screen voting machines - led to some ballots being turned in later than usual and led to other related problems, Washington County Election Director Dorothy Kaetzel said Wednesday. Voters told election judges, as poll workers in Maryland are called, that they were comfortable using the touch-screen machines to cast their ballots, Kaetzel said. The Washington County Board of Elections conducted an aggressive voter-education campaign demonstrating the new voting machines to at least 75 area groups.
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NEWS
by WANDA T. WILLIAMS | March 3, 2004
wandaw@herald-mail.com Washington County voters used computerized voting machines for the first time during Tuesday's primary election, and election results were slow to come in. By midnight, all 46 precincts had reported. Charles L. Mobley Jr., president of the Washington County Board of Elections, said results were coming in slowly because a bottleneck formed in the hallway at the Board of Elections office as poll workers arrived with the electronic cards that recorded voters' selections and had to wait for them to be processed.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE and WANDA T. WILLIAMS | November 3, 2004
julieg@herald-mail.com wandaw@herald-mail.com Washington County's voter turnout increased this year, but just slightly - percentagewise - compared to four years ago, Election Director Dorothy Kaetzel said. The unofficial voter turnout on Tuesday was 70 percent compared with 69 percent in 2000, according to election results. Kaetzel had predicted turnout Tuesday would be 75 percent to 80 percent. Kaetzel said she had hoped that a large number of people who registered to vote in September and October would result in a higher turnout.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | October 8, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY Washington County's population growth is affecting more than schools, roads and home prices. Washington County Board of Elections officials say they're anticipating a 12 percent increase in the number of registered voters for the 2006 election, a trend that's expected to continue beyond 2010. More voters mean more voting machines, more precincts and more election judges, which means the Election Board will need a bigger budget.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | January 18, 2006
ANNAPOLIS tammyb@herald-mail.com Though the House of Delegates voted Tuesday to override Gov. Robert Ehrlich's veto of several election law changes, two local legislators say the vote might not be the end, particularly concerning a measure to allow early voting beginning this year. Del. LeRoy E. Myers, R-Washington/Allegany, and Del. Christopher B. Shank, R-Washington, said Tuesday that they had heard some groups already were talking about petitioning to take the early voting bill to referendum in September.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 21, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Half of the money Berkeley County, W.Va., officials need to convert to touch-screen voting machines for the 2008 elections can not be borrowed from the state's interest-free, revolving loan program, county commissioners were told Thursday. The prospect of paying half of the $480,500 bill for 155 Ivotronic voting machines appeared a bit unsettling to commissioners Howard L. Strauss, Steven C. Teufel and Ronald K. Collins, who last week voted unanimously to make the purchase with a loan to be paid back to the state in five years.
NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION and MATTHEW UMSTEAD | October 28, 2008
EASTERN PANHANDLE, W.Va. -- Excitement might be building as the general election nears, but for thousands of residents in Berkeley and Jefferson counties, voting is already behind them. Since early voting started across the state on Oct. 15, nearly 10,000 people in Berkeley and Jefferson counties have voted in what election officials say has been an impressive turnout. Early voting ends at 5 p.m. Saturday. Before early voting began, Berkeley County Clerk John W. Small Jr. predicted 5,000 people, "maybe more," would cast ballots before election day. "My new target is 10,000," Small said Monday afternoon after a turnout of 861 voters Saturday pushed the tally to 5,378.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 29, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Election officials across Maryland are anticipating high voter turnout in November's general election. In Washington County, that means more electronic voting machines, more poll books and more judges. With less than four months to go before voters head to the polls to elect the country's next president, election workers here are preparing for a rush of voters and hoping to prevent long lines and last-minute registrations. "We've increased our staff, our equipment.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | December 3, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - Annexation - specifically a type of annexation commonly called "shoestring" or "pipestem" - was the main topic of discussion Thursday between legislators and Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan county commissioners. Vivian Parsons, executive director of the County Commissioners' Association of West Virginia, led the two-hour meeting, held Thursday afternoon at the Charles Town Library. Parsons told the 25 people in attendance that she hopes a bill will be passed in next year's legislative session that permits revisions to one of the ways a city or town can annex land into its borders.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD and DAVE McMILLION | November 4, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Buoyed by an emotion-charged sprint for the White House and scores of contested local races, record numbers of voters are expected at the pools today in West Virginia. Given that about 18 percent of Berkeley County's 64,949 registered voters already have voted, County Clerk John W. Small Jr. said Monday that he expects a 70 percent turnout by the time polls close tonight. As of Monday, there were 24,611 Berkeley County residents registered with the Democratic Party, 24,233 Republicans and 15,727 registered with no party affiliation, according to a report generated Monday by the county voter registration office.
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