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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 27, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com The Eastern Panhandle recorded its first case of the West Nile virus Monday when Jefferson County health officials learned that a dead crow tested positive for the disease. The crow was found in a yard in Middleway on Aug. 16, said Rosemarie Cannarella, Jefferson County's health officer. A man who lived in a house on the property discovered the bird and turned it over to health officials for testing, Cannarella said. It was sent to the College of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Georgia, Cannarella said.
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NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE and MARLO BARNHART | August 20, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com marlob@herald-mail.com Two more crows found in Washington County have tested positive for West Nile virus and a dead crow found in Greencastle, Pa., last week tested positive for the disease, health officials said Monday. Test results Monday confirmed two new cases of West Nile virus in crows found in Washington County, bringing to three the number of birds with the disease found in the county, said Rod MacRae, spokesman for the Washington County Health Department.
NEWS
by KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | August 16, 2002
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene recommends the public take the following precautions to avoid West Nile virus infection. Since mosquitos are attracted to stagnant water, clean gutters to allow water to flow freely. Remove old tires or drill holes in tires used for playground equipment. Turn over wading pools, wheelbarrows, wagons and carts when not in use. Replace water in birdbaths at least twice a week. Turn garbage can lids upside down and make sure trash receptacles don't contain water.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 15, 2002
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Although it is not clear why, horses are particularly susceptible to the West Nile virus, a Jefferson County health official said. An increasing number of horses in the country are showing up dead or showing symptoms of the disease, and in Minnesota, eight have died from the virus, said James Hecker, chairman of the Jefferson County Board of Health. The risk is not great for horses at the Charles Town Races because horses that are highly valued are usually vaccinated for the disease, Hecker said.
NEWS
February 15, 2002
Franklin County gets grant to study West Nile Virus Chambersburg, Pa. By STACEY DANZUSO chbbureau@innernet.net Franklin County will spend more than $90,000 in state grants this mosquito season to target the pests and check for West Nile Virus. The Franklin County Conservation District will use the funds to begin mosquito surveillance in April. Checking for the potentially deadly West Nile Virus will continue through October, according to Ernest Tarner, manager of the agency.
NEWS
May 7, 2001
Bird search tracks West Nile virus By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI kimy@herald-mail.com The Washington County Health Department is asking people to be on the lookout for dead birds so that the bird carcasses can be tested for West Nile virus. The mosquito-borne disease has been documented in Frederick County, Md., and it's only a matter of time before the virus it heads west, said Roderick MacRae, county health department spokesman. "At some point we expect to have West Nile present in Washington County," said MacRae.
NEWS
October 5, 2000
West Nile virus not likely to hit county By DON WORTHINGTON / Staff Writer see also: To report dead birds Although Washington County has a large population of migratory crows, it is not a high-risk area for an outbreak of the potentially fatal West Nile virus, area public health officials say. Dead crows are used to track the spread of the virus because they are highly susceptible to the virus, said Joey Scaletto, West...
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | May 4, 2000
A software virus that tempted computer users with an e-mail note proclaiming "ILOVEYOU" crippled government and corporate computer networks around the world Thursday, and left Allegheny Energy and city of Hagerstown employees without Internet access for most of the day. cont. from front page The affected employees were not expected to have Internet access before this morning at the earliest, Allegheny Energy and city employees said. Allegheny Energy said customer service was unaffected.
NEWS
February 11, 1999
By MARLO BARNHART / Staff Writer Eight days ago, Les and Lori Martin's suburban family existence was turned upside down by a tiny virus that attacked and paralyzed their child. On Feb. 4, the Martin's 12-year-old son, Christopher, was diagnosed with transverse myelitis, a condition in which the spinal cord becomes inflamed, causing paralysis and sometimes worse. "We did lose him briefly at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore when he was critical," said Lori Martin Thursday from her Washington County home.
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