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NEWS
by NABELA ENAM | June 20, 2006
Living in the 21st century, it is difficult to imagine a life without computers. We use them to talk to friends, catch up on the news, listen to music, watch movies and so much more. Computers make our lives easy, but they have to be properly maintained. Like humans, computers get infected - though not in the biological sense. My friend Sandra Maina experienced a computer virus. "On my computer all the programs were deleted and my computer crashed," she said. "I needed my mom's assistance to help me reinstall all the programs.
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NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | April 24, 2006
The Midwest mumps outbreak should be cause for curiosity but not too much concern, Tri-State-area health officials say. Most Americans who have received the mumps vaccine or experienced the virus have a high level of immunity to mumps, explains Rod MacRae, spokesman for the Washington County Health Department. The vaccine used to prevent mumps works against the Midwest mumps strain, according to information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Also, mumps is fatal only in rare occasions.
NEWS
March 19, 2006
The Charles Town Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association and the Virginia HBPA are sponsoring a seminar Monday at Tailgaters Restaurant near Charles Town. "The presentation will be 'The Herpes Virus - understanding and preventing it,'" said Charles Town HBPA spokesperson Patti Evans. "Dr. Reid McLellan from the national HBPA will make a presentation and Dr. Keith Berkeley from the Valley Equine Clinic will add views on 'Preventive Vaccinations.'" The Herpes Virus has been in the news this year - affecting thoroughbreds throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | March 5, 2006
HALFWAY Part of the way through a scan for viruses, the diagnosis for Richard Stevenson's computer was severe. "It has eight viruses so far, and I never use it," the Hagerstown resident said. "My family uses it. " "Personally, I prefer my typewriter," said Stevenson, who is taking a computer class at Hagerstown Community College. Stevenson brought his Compaq Presario in Saturday for a checkup at the Computer CPR Clinic held by HCC's Information Technology Association.
NEWS
By LARRY YANOS | February 5, 2006
Maryland-based thoroughbred trainer Chris Grove is awaiting test results as to whether his 4-year-old runner Hot Rod Fever has the equine herpesvirus. "We'll know early this week," Grove said from Bowie Race Course. "I'm not allowed to run any of my 29 horses at Laurel Park, but I was allowed to enter a horse on Friday for this coming Wednesday - pending the results from the tests. " The Maryland Department of Agriculture placed an initial "Investigational Animal Hold Order" on Barn 1 at Bowie Training Center last week after Hot Rod Fever showed symptoms of equine herpesvirus, which causes upper respiratory infection and can also cause neurological disease.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | February 2, 2006
As you might be aware, no journalist is more dedicated to covering the growing obesity crisis than I am, seeing as how I consider it to be a "hometown Hagerstown" issue, much the way journalists in Cocoa Beach cover Cape Canaveral. The government, which defines "obese" as anyone whose ribs cannot be played like a xylophone and is basically one carrot stick away from abject starvation, is a willing accomplice in my quest for information, since every other day it is coming out with a new report under the scientific category of "You people are pigs!"
NEWS
by DON AINES | September 28, 2004
HARRISBURG, Pa. - The Pennsylvania Department of Health announced Monday the first confirmed case of human West Nile virus in Franklin County this year, a 75-year-old woman who was hospitalized in early September. The unidentified woman has since been released from the hospital and was recuperating at home, said Jessica Seiders, a department spokeswoman. This year, however, the state has seen a precipitous drop in the number of West Nile cases in humans, Seiders said. The woman was only the seventh confirmed case of the disease in Pennsylvania, compared to 237 in 2003, eight of whom died, she said.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 27, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com It's that time again. The fall season officially began last week. The flu season will be coming on its heels. It can begin as early as October and last as late as May, according to information on the Web site of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov. Normally, flu activity begins between December and February. Last year, outbreaks in Texas were reported in early to mid-October. And last year's flu season was more severe than the previous four seasons.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | October 3, 2003
For the first time since comprehensive testing began last year, a mosquito has tested positive for the West Nile virus in Washington County. The infected mosquito was trapped and tested about two weeks ago on the C&O Canal near Williamsport, said Laurie Bucher, environmental health officer at the Washington County Health Department. "It's like finding a needle in a haystack. There are a lot of mosquitoes this year with the wet weather," she said. The Maryland Department of Agriculture, which helps conducts the tests, estimates that fewer than one in 1,000 mosquitoes is infected, entomologist Michael Cantwell said.
NEWS
by BIG SYD | September 26, 2003
I was harkening back to the good old days. I remember the times when it was so easy being a prognosticator. Picking games was so much easier when I just had to rely on my Phil Luckett comemorative two-headed coin, a magic 8-ball, ouija board and rock, paper and scissors to come up with that decisive selection. Now, I have the computer and research and soft-serve ice cream department at the Dargan campus of Prognosticator University (affectionately known as PU on the front of our T-shirts)
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