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NEWS
By LARRY YANOS | February 5, 2006
Maryland-based thoroughbred trainer Chris Grove is awaiting test results as to whether his 4-year-old runner Hot Rod Fever has the equine herpesvirus. "We'll know early this week," Grove said from Bowie Race Course. "I'm not allowed to run any of my 29 horses at Laurel Park, but I was allowed to enter a horse on Friday for this coming Wednesday - pending the results from the tests. " The Maryland Department of Agriculture placed an initial "Investigational Animal Hold Order" on Barn 1 at Bowie Training Center last week after Hot Rod Fever showed symptoms of equine herpesvirus, which causes upper respiratory infection and can also cause neurological disease.
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NEWS
By TARA REILLY | March 5, 2006
HALFWAY Part of the way through a scan for viruses, the diagnosis for Richard Stevenson's computer was severe. "It has eight viruses so far, and I never use it," the Hagerstown resident said. "My family uses it. " "Personally, I prefer my typewriter," said Stevenson, who is taking a computer class at Hagerstown Community College. Stevenson brought his Compaq Presario in Saturday for a checkup at the Computer CPR Clinic held by HCC's Information Technology Association.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
The Pennsylvania West Nile Control Program has reported four new cases of human West Nile virus, including one in Franklin County. The program reported on its website Friday that a 66-year-old male in Franklin County has tested positive for the virus. The other three confirmed cases were a 45-year-old male, a 58-year-old female and a 64-year-old female, all in Philadelphia. The program also reported 10 new positive tests in mosquitos. They were in Allegheny, Berks, Chester, Dauphin, Lebanon and York counties.
NEWS
October 5, 2000
West Nile virus not likely to hit county By DON WORTHINGTON / Staff Writer see also: To report dead birds Although Washington County has a large population of migratory crows, it is not a high-risk area for an outbreak of the potentially fatal West Nile virus, area public health officials say. Dead crows are used to track the spread of the virus because they are highly susceptible to the virus, said Joey Scaletto, West...
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | August 27, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com The Eastern Panhandle recorded its first case of the West Nile virus Monday when Jefferson County health officials learned that a dead crow tested positive for the disease. The crow was found in a yard in Middleway on Aug. 16, said Rosemarie Cannarella, Jefferson County's health officer. A man who lived in a house on the property discovered the bird and turned it over to health officials for testing, Cannarella said. It was sent to the College of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Georgia, Cannarella said.
NEWS
February 15, 2002
Franklin County gets grant to study West Nile Virus Chambersburg, Pa. By STACEY DANZUSO chbbureau@innernet.net Franklin County will spend more than $90,000 in state grants this mosquito season to target the pests and check for West Nile Virus. The Franklin County Conservation District will use the funds to begin mosquito surveillance in April. Checking for the potentially deadly West Nile Virus will continue through October, according to Ernest Tarner, manager of the agency.
NEWS
by DON AINES | September 28, 2004
HARRISBURG, Pa. - The Pennsylvania Department of Health announced Monday the first confirmed case of human West Nile virus in Franklin County this year, a 75-year-old woman who was hospitalized in early September. The unidentified woman has since been released from the hospital and was recuperating at home, said Jessica Seiders, a department spokeswoman. This year, however, the state has seen a precipitous drop in the number of West Nile cases in humans, Seiders said. The woman was only the seventh confirmed case of the disease in Pennsylvania, compared to 237 in 2003, eight of whom died, she said.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | January 12, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Health officials are reminding area residents to carefully observe personal hygiene practices in wake of confirmed seasonal outbreaks of Norovirus-related illness at community health-care facilities in Berkeley County. Though not uncommon this time of year, "Norovirus is highly contagious and is transmitted primarily through hand transfer of the virus to the mouth, by direct person-to-person spread, and through vomit or fecal contamination of food or water," Berkeley County Health Officer Diana Gaviria said in a news release Thursday.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE and MARLO BARNHART | August 20, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com marlob@herald-mail.com Two more crows found in Washington County have tested positive for West Nile virus and a dead crow found in Greencastle, Pa., last week tested positive for the disease, health officials said Monday. Test results Monday confirmed two new cases of West Nile virus in crows found in Washington County, bringing to three the number of birds with the disease found in the county, said Rod MacRae, spokesman for the Washington County Health Department.
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