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Vinegar

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NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | September 16, 1997
Vinegar adds zip to salads, sauces, soups, pasta, chicken or fish without adding an ounce of fat. It can be used as a versatile seasoning and preservative. Vinegar is highly acidic and serves as a natural preservative when combined with other foods. For example, adding vinegar or vinegar-containing ingredients like mayonnaise or pickles to salads helps inhibit growth of bacteria. Vinegar is also an excellent meat tenderizer. It adds flavor to meat juices, softens tough meat fibers and helps keep bacteria growth in check during the process.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 19, 2009
Dear Lynne: Solve a mystery for me, please. Verjuice -- what is it? I am a pretty sophisticated foodie, but this is a new one. What am I missing and is there a substitute? --Jerry in Lincoln Dear Jerry: Verjuice is the juice of unripe grapes. It can be gently sweet or lean toward tart. Substitute a sweet-tart blend of grape juice and cider vinegar, or fruity white wine with a little vinegar. Use it instead of vinegar in salads (a good way to make salad wine-friendly), use it wherever wine is used for marinades and sauces, and pour it over fruit, or over ice with bubbly water for a summer tonic.
NEWS
June 3, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or julieg@herald-mail.com. Include a daytime phone number. Simple lentil soup 2 pounds brown lentils, dried 2 large baking potatoes 4 big onions, diced 1/2 head of garlic, diced finely 1/2 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons thyme leaves, fresh or dried Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons sugar, optional 2 tablespoons cider vinegar, optional Wash lentils.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | May 2, 2013
This fresh, flavorful recipe is easy to make - if you are quick with a knife. I suggest using a very sharp knife, not trying to use a food processor or chopper because you run the risk of creating watermelon soup. Simply take a large slice out of a watermelon, about 1 to 1/2 inches thick, and cut the melon away from the rind and into small dice. The idea is to create a 3:1 ratio of watermelon to onion and pepper. If you have fresh corn, use one fresh, cooked ear, and cut the corn away from the cob. If you don't have or can't find fig balsamic vinegar, use a quality-aged balsamic.
NEWS
July 14, 1997
Here are some tips to help keep your home free of chemical contamination. Use natural products like baking soda and vinegar when cleaning your home. Avoid using chlorine and ammonia or other chemically-based cleansers. After buying linens, wash them three times before using. Use a low phosphate detergent in the first wash, a cup of white vinegar in the second wash and a cup of baking soda in the third wash. If you are sensitive to perfumes and other odors, but can't get them out of your clothes, wash the clothing in vodka.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | December 26, 2009
Dear Lynne: Every Christmas our family celebrates with the English classic -- roast beef and Yorkshire Pudding. But my mom (who's in her 80s) has lost her touch with the pudding. She used to make the fluffiest you've ever tasted, but the past couple of years it's like lead. We've tried different recipes and different oven temperatures, but nothing works. Could it be because it's cooler here in Atlanta that it was in Los Angeles, where we lived until several years ago? -- Jeff in Atlanta Dear Jeff: Your mom's touch is just swell.
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | September 1, 2011
On my kitchen windowsill sat a cup containing an unknown concoction. I picked up the cup and almost dumped its contents down the drain, but a memory from the night before made me hesitate. I was talking to my son about his homework, which he had been working on most of the afternoon and evening. By the time I went to bed that night, he had the majority of the work done, all except finishing a Spanish essay and a chemistry experiment. The substance in the cup didn't look like Spanish food, so I assumed it was part of my son's chemistry experiment.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | May 20, 2010
Dear Lynne: I have a vinegar dilemma. In 1982 I bought two 1-gallon plastic jugs of French Beaufor vinegar, champagne and red wine. When I moved in 1987, they accidentally went into a box marked "storage" and have just surfaced now. Will the vinegar still be good? -- Dan in California Dear Dan: First, I've got to say I envy you that Beaufor vinegar. Their cider vinegar is a personal favorite, so I imagine the champagne and red-wine ones must be as fine. Normally, old vinegar, if kept sealed in glass in a cool, dark place, will be fine, perhaps even superb.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | March 27, 2009
I do not spring clean the way my mom did. I remember the cool, sunny days when she would throw open the windows, shove the furniture aside and take down the drapes. She'd snap on her bright yellow gloves, grab a rag, and have a go at the ceiling, walls and floors with Spic-n-Span. She went room to room, day after day, in a ritual passed down from her mother. I've had the urge to clean with such fervor less than a handful of times in my life. Each time it happened, I was nearly ready to give birth and chalked it up to the nesting phenomenon.
NEWS
Alicia Notarianni | Making Ends Meet | May 10, 2012
I just might have the world's best smelling bathroom. The skeptic would ask if I've smelled every bathroom in the world. The answer, of course, is no. And the rest of the answer is, "Have you smelled MY bathroom?" Not to brag or anything, but the scent of my loo and its surroundings calls to mind a field of sprightly lavender on the outskirts of a quaint village, perhaps on a Mediterranean shore. I'm not sure my teenage sons would explain it just that way, but I'm saying, it smells good.
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NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | May 2, 2013
This fresh, flavorful recipe is easy to make - if you are quick with a knife. I suggest using a very sharp knife, not trying to use a food processor or chopper because you run the risk of creating watermelon soup. Simply take a large slice out of a watermelon, about 1 to 1/2 inches thick, and cut the melon away from the rind and into small dice. The idea is to create a 3:1 ratio of watermelon to onion and pepper. If you have fresh corn, use one fresh, cooked ear, and cut the corn away from the cob. If you don't have or can't find fig balsamic vinegar, use a quality-aged balsamic.
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NEWS
Alicia Notarianni | Making Ends Meet | May 10, 2012
I just might have the world's best smelling bathroom. The skeptic would ask if I've smelled every bathroom in the world. The answer, of course, is no. And the rest of the answer is, "Have you smelled MY bathroom?" Not to brag or anything, but the scent of my loo and its surroundings calls to mind a field of sprightly lavender on the outskirts of a quaint village, perhaps on a Mediterranean shore. I'm not sure my teenage sons would explain it just that way, but I'm saying, it smells good.
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | September 1, 2011
On my kitchen windowsill sat a cup containing an unknown concoction. I picked up the cup and almost dumped its contents down the drain, but a memory from the night before made me hesitate. I was talking to my son about his homework, which he had been working on most of the afternoon and evening. By the time I went to bed that night, he had the majority of the work done, all except finishing a Spanish essay and a chemistry experiment. The substance in the cup didn't look like Spanish food, so I assumed it was part of my son's chemistry experiment.
NEWS
By LISA PREJEAN | August 6, 2010
When a friend shared her broccoli salad recipe with our family, my 11-year-old was intrigued. She loves to help in the kitchen, especially when she likes the taste of a dish. This salad is one that both she and her 15-year-old brother like. Lately my kids have asked for more salads, smoothies, fruits and vegetables. The kids are becoming more active in sports, and the healthful eating just seems to go hand-in-hand with increased activity and desired performance ... or at least it should.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | May 20, 2010
Dear Lynne: I have a vinegar dilemma. In 1982 I bought two 1-gallon plastic jugs of French Beaufor vinegar, champagne and red wine. When I moved in 1987, they accidentally went into a box marked "storage" and have just surfaced now. Will the vinegar still be good? -- Dan in California Dear Dan: First, I've got to say I envy you that Beaufor vinegar. Their cider vinegar is a personal favorite, so I imagine the champagne and red-wine ones must be as fine. Normally, old vinegar, if kept sealed in glass in a cool, dark place, will be fine, perhaps even superb.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | December 26, 2009
Dear Lynne: Every Christmas our family celebrates with the English classic -- roast beef and Yorkshire Pudding. But my mom (who's in her 80s) has lost her touch with the pudding. She used to make the fluffiest you've ever tasted, but the past couple of years it's like lead. We've tried different recipes and different oven temperatures, but nothing works. Could it be because it's cooler here in Atlanta that it was in Los Angeles, where we lived until several years ago? -- Jeff in Atlanta Dear Jeff: Your mom's touch is just swell.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 19, 2009
Dear Lynne: Solve a mystery for me, please. Verjuice -- what is it? I am a pretty sophisticated foodie, but this is a new one. What am I missing and is there a substitute? --Jerry in Lincoln Dear Jerry: Verjuice is the juice of unripe grapes. It can be gently sweet or lean toward tart. Substitute a sweet-tart blend of grape juice and cider vinegar, or fruity white wine with a little vinegar. Use it instead of vinegar in salads (a good way to make salad wine-friendly), use it wherever wine is used for marinades and sauces, and pour it over fruit, or over ice with bubbly water for a summer tonic.
NEWS
June 3, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or julieg@herald-mail.com. Include a daytime phone number. Simple lentil soup 2 pounds brown lentils, dried 2 large baking potatoes 4 big onions, diced 1/2 head of garlic, diced finely 1/2 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons thyme leaves, fresh or dried Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons sugar, optional 2 tablespoons cider vinegar, optional Wash lentils.
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | March 27, 2009
I do not spring clean the way my mom did. I remember the cool, sunny days when she would throw open the windows, shove the furniture aside and take down the drapes. She'd snap on her bright yellow gloves, grab a rag, and have a go at the ceiling, walls and floors with Spic-n-Span. She went room to room, day after day, in a ritual passed down from her mother. I've had the urge to clean with such fervor less than a handful of times in my life. Each time it happened, I was nearly ready to give birth and chalked it up to the nesting phenomenon.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 24, 2008
With summertime winding down, many people are planning Labor Day potlucks as their last hoorahs before cold weather hits - a time more appropriate than any for Joyce Jones to pull out mom's potato salad recipe. Jones, 46, who lives north of Hagers-town, said it's a recipe she learned through osmosis, watching her mother prepare it for summertime potlucks and holidays. It's a recipe stored in memory and re-created via pinches and dabs, though she was able to jot down a blueprint of her mother's potato salad recipe for Herald-Mail readers.
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