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Veto

NEWS
January 11, 2005
One day before the start of the regular session, Maryland lawmakers head to Annapolis today to decide whether to override any of the 19 vetoes Gov. Robert Ehrlich made last year. Many involve important issues, but the most crucial one is the special-session legislation on medical malpractice. In the bill, the governor got some of the reforms he wanted, but he opposes the fact that a fund created to hold down doctors' insurance premiums would come from a 2 percent tax on HMO premiums.
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NEWS
by Brien Poffenberger | January 7, 2005
The New Year brings both new opportunities and new challenges as lawmakers settle in for their annual work in Annapolis. This year actually starts with some unfinished business from last year. The much-deserved attention given to the medical-malpractice issue in Annapolis in the last couple of weeks has overshadowed two upcoming votes that directly affect the business community. Last year, the legislature passed two decidedly anti-business bills and the governor vetoed both. At the beginning of the 2005 session - Tuesday, Jan. 11 - the legislature will take up proposals to override each veto and our representatives need to hear from you. The chamber evaluated these bills, as it does all legislation, based on its long-standing view that state government should: 1. Be more efficient, 2. Reduce the burden on businesses.
NEWS
by the Cracker Barrel | December 30, 2004
ANNAPOLIS (AP) - Democratic legislative leaders, ignoring veto threats from Gov. Robert Ehrlich, put together a medical malpractice insurance reform package Wednesday that they said will solve the state's malpractice crisis and ensure that doctors will be available when Marylanders need them. The bill would provide immediate relief from the 33 percent average increase doctors will have to pay for malpractice insurance coverage in 2005, lowering the hikes to 5 percent. It also would put new restrictions on malpractice lawsuits, a measure that lawmakers said will hold the line on future rate increases by reducing the cost of malpractice settlements.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | January 21, 2004
laurae@herald-mail.com Over a local lawmaker's cries that it will hurt consumers and businesses, the Maryland House of Delegates voted Tuesday to override the governor's veto of an energy conservation bill. It was the first veto override in 15 years, coming on the heels of last week's override vote by the state Senate. The 92-47 vote fell along party lines, with Washington County's four Republicans backing Gov. Robert Ehrlich's veto. The legislation requires appliances such as ceiling fans and floor lamps to meet higher energy efficiency standards.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | January 16, 2004
laurae@herald-mail.com For the first time in 15 years, the Maryland Senate used its veto override powers by passing an energy conservation bill and two others that had been rejected by Gov. Robert Ehrlich. The three bills now go to the House of Delegates, which is expected to follow suit as soon as today. All 14 Republicans in the Senate, including Washington County's three senators, tried to block Thursday's veto override but were trumped by the Democrat majority.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | September 17, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com The Washington County Commissioners on Tuesday unanimously shot down a proposal to change the county's form of government from commission to a type of home rule. The proposal was made by a task force created by the Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce, the League of Women Voters of Washington County and the Greater Hagerstown Committee. The task force held meetings last year. Members of the task force told the commissioners last month that switching to code home rule would bring local government closer to the people and lessen the commissioners' dependence on the Maryland General Assembly.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | May 17, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com After vetoing all legislation passed by Sen. Alex X. Mooney, Gov. Parris Glendening on Thursday signed into law five bills championed by Mooney's challenger. Mooney, R-Frederick/Washington, called the Democratic governor's action partisan. "This is the problem with a one-party state. Unfortunately, the Glendening-Townsend Administration isn't interested in helping Western Maryland," he said. Glendening spokeswoman Michelle Byrnie said veto decisions are made based on public policy.
NEWS
May 18, 2001
Bill sponsored by Mooney vetoed Gov. Parris Glendening vetoed a bill, sponsored by a local lawmaker, designed to help taxpayers get refunds in rare cases when their appeals were held up by administrative red tape. It would have been the first legislation chiefly sponsored by Sen. Alex X. Mooney, R-Frederick/Washington, to make it into law. In a letter of explanation, Glendening said he wanted to keep Maryland's tax refund regulations consistent with federal regulations.
NEWS
May 18, 2001
Nurse practitioners bill vetoed Gov. Parris Glendening vetoed a bill Thursday aimed at boosting nurse practitioners. The bill, which narrowly passed the Maryland General Assembly, would have allowed nurse practitioners to serve as primary care providers for managed care companies. It was opposed by doctors' groups. Glendening said he feared managed care companies would coerce patients into seeing nurse practitioners. "I am troubled by the lack of consensus among the health care professionals and the potential for HMOs to unduly influence the health care consumer.
NEWS
November 4, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Chambersburg McCONNELLSBURG, Pa. - A $500,000 federal grant awarded to Fulton County last month for installation of water and sewer lines in the proposed 110-acre South Central Business Park was taken away by President Bill Clinton as part of a line-item veto. Fulton County's grant was one of seven killed by Clinton's $20 million line-item veto on Saturday. "It appears someone in the executive branch didn't do their homework," said Donald Bard, president of the Fulton Industrial Development Authority.
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