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By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Lee Blevins held a letter Monday that had remained sealed since his mother wrote it 63 years ago. The intended recipient was his brother, Heren, who was captured in 1950 while serving in the U.S. Army during the first year of the Korean War. Blevins said he had no idea what the letter would say as he opened the envelope, marked on the outside with a raspberry colored return-to-sender stamp that read, “Verified Missing in Action.” ...
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NEWS
July 8, 2013
Sharpsburg Bible Church showed its support for the military on Memorial Day. Capt. Fedric Boyle, chaplain with the Maryland National Guard, presented the morning message, reminding the audience that they are in God's army. Music with a military theme was played, along with singing.   The altar area was decorated with two flower arrangements made with Union and Confederate flags, and hats. The church foyer had displays of photos with names and information about 30 members of the church family and their relatives, totaling more than 90 men and women.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Upon completion of the two-year waiting period, Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics,  Hagerstown branch, announced it is able to accept Veterans Affairs educational benefits. Veterans of the U.S. armed forces who are eligible for education benefits can now take advantage of the only FAA-approved airframe and powerplant maintenance school in the state of Maryland (http://av-info.faa.gov/MaintenanceSchool.asp). PIA is recognized as a “2013 Military Friendly School” by G.I. Jobs with a veteran enrollment of 19 percent.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
A Disabled American Veteran service officer will be at the Hagerstown VA Clinic, Hub Plaza Building, 1101 Opal Court, on Thursday, June 20, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The service officer will be available to provide information and prepare VA claims for veterans, their spouses or family members to obtain VA benefits. Participants are asked to bring a copy of their military discharge, DD 214 or other service records, VA claim number if one was issued and any correspondence or rating decision information.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 2, 2013
When Sam Clark participates in the Operation God Bless America benefit motorcycle ride each year, he is personally aware of how the money raised helps the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Martinsburg, W.Va. A U.S. Army veteran who served in the Vietnam War, Clark has utilized services from the medical center. He added his 2007 Harley-Davidson Street Bob to the line of nearly 2,000 motorcycles in the 23rd annual Operation God Bless America ride Sunday. “I used the VA hospital they're going to. I'm not only contributing in the ride, but I'm benefiting from it,” said Clark, of Bunker Hill, W.Va.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 30, 2013
Speaking at the Joint Veterans Council of Washington County's annual Memorial Day ceremony Thursday, retired Army Col. William E. Webber - who lost an arm and a leg in the Korean War - recounted how often American soldiers have been sent to fight since the turn of the 20th century. “We're supposed to be a peaceful people, but if you look at our history, every 20 years, we send young men and women into combat,” Weber told attendees at the Washington County Maryland Veterans Memorial Garden at Martin L. “Marty” Snook Memorial Park.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | May 27, 2013
Vietnam veteran Art Callaham told people attending Boonsboro's annual Memorial Day ceremony that, in many ways, he revels in the fact that people choose not only to remember military veterans on the holiday, but others who have served their country. In recent years, that has included “those brave New York City fire and police members who died by cowards' hands,” Callaham said, addressing the crowd from a podium near Town Hall on Main Street. Callaham said “their sacrifice of love for their fellow man was made in an undeclared war, yet that sacrifice was no less a sacrifice of love and duty to those same principles that men and women in uniform make for us today, and have made for us in the past.” Many people sat or stood along the sidewalks that bordered the holiday parade shortly after the ceremony.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 27, 2013
Jeanette Easterday of Mount Lena honored American soldiers, particularly those who have been killed, at the Mount Lena United Methodist Church Memorial Day Service, by saying they decided to “stand and fight” instead of “cut and run.” “For every veteran who marches in a parade, there's another who will never march again,” Easterday, a member of the church, said Monday. “Please don't forget them.” More than 20 people, including veterans, attended the church's Memorial Day service late Monday morning.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2013
Jesse Englehart was one of thousands of Marines who were pulling back from the Chosin Reservoir when he and a friend saw a clean poncho that looked peculiar lying on the frozen ground. He said the two walked toward the poncho and lifted it. “There was a Chinese soldier with a rifle,” the 81-year-old Englehart said recently from his Washington County home. “I'm not sure if I shot him or my buddy shot him. It's better if it's blocked out of your mind, I think.” He said his service during the Korean War was the first leg of a 22-year-career in the Marine Corps that led to two tours of duty in Vietnam and a post as security chief at Camp David.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 25, 2013
In 1953, the Korean War had been raging for three years when thousands of North Korean prisoners of war were set free below the 38th Parallel at Pusan. Hagerstown resident Ed Peters, 81, said he was a military policeman serving in Korea at the time as he watched the enemy soldiers mix with the local population. “They brought hundreds of (boats) into Pusan and released those guys in the streets,” Peters said. “Letting those prisoners go free in Pusan created some headaches for the local police ... They were running around and no one knew who was who.” According to documents from the time, the prisoners were released in June 1953 because many of them said they were anti-Communist and wouldn't return to fight for North Korea.
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