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by LAURA ERNDE | June 12, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com Despite being critically burned in a cooking accident at Washington County Technical High School last month, culinary student Dustin Holley graduated with his class Tuesday. "I was a little reluctant at first. People talked me into it. I know all my friends are behind me," said Holley, who had bandages around the burns on his neck. Holley's face, chest and arms were burned May 9 while he and two other students were preparing a chicken flamb dish.
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NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | March 22, 2006
Odds and ends from a columnist's notebook: ยท This week's online chat with Lynn Jones, founder of the South Washington County Military Support Group, reminded me again of how much we need readers' help to do a good job. Jones' group was founded in 2003 to provide support the families of those whose children were soldiers stationed in Afghanistan and Iraq. At one point, Jones' son Kevin and daughter Kelly were both stationed in Iraq, so she knows firsthand the fear and frustration that is part of the daily lives of soldiers' parents.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
Big crowd expected at funeral By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer see also: Craig Wibberley funeral details Saturday's military funeral services for Craig Wibberley of Williamsport will cause temporary closings of some roads and Interstate 70 ramps and will delay traffic, Sheriff Charles Mades said Tuesday. continued The services for sailor Wibberley, 19, may draw as many as 500 to 1,000 people, possibly including Gov. Parris Glendening and federal officials, he said.
NEWS
October 14, 2000
'My heart hurts because of a loss to the world' By LAURA ERNDE and SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writers Patrick Roy, a sailor aboard the USS Cole, is pictured above. Patrick's mother, Kathy Brown, speaks outsie her Keedysville home Friday while family friend Michael Walsh listens. photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer Above, a flag flies at half-staff outside the post office in Keedysville, Patrick Roy's hometown.
NEWS
October 27, 2000
Friends, family mourn Roy By LAURA ERNDE / Staff Writer KEEDYSVILLE - Family and friends of Patrick Howard Roy gathered at Salem United Methodist Church Friday to quietly mourn the fallen USS Cole sailor. Dozens of pictures representing Roy's 19 years of life were set up on either side of his flag-draped casket. In one picture, he was a newborn in his mother's arms. In another, he was a young man standing in his Navy dress uniform. There was a photo of him when he was just a young, blond-haired boy, proudly holding a fish he had just caught.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | May 2, 2011
For most Americans, the touchstone event marking the beginning of the war on terror was the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Pentagon and Flight 93, but for Tom Wibberly and his family, it began 11 months earlier. More than a decade after the Oct. 12, 2000, attack on the USS Cole that claimed the life of his son, Craig, Tom Wibberley was awakened by a call from his daughter informing him that the man who ordered that attack, Osama Bin Laden, had been killed by U.S. Navy SEALs in a raid in Pakistan.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | November 12, 2004
andrews@herald-mail.com HALFWAY - With membership dwindling, veterans' groups should recruit other people who serve and protect in various ways, former Washington County Commissioner Ronald Bowers said Thursday. "We must explore the realm of possibility of including others who take significant part in continuing to secure our freedoms and protect us from terrorism into our organizations," Bowers said. He was the main speaker at the Joint Veterans Council of Washington County's annual Veterans Day ceremony at Martin L. "Marty" Snook Memorial Park in Halfway.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 2, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. -- John Wilkes Booth took aim at the back of the president's head, then stood stock still for a few minutes as a narrator recounted the events of Abraham Lincoln's assassination. Having taken his "One small step for (a) man. One giant leap for mankind," Neil Armstrong stared off into the universe as a group of students listened to a retelling of the 1969 lunar landing. Those were two American moments brought to still life Monday at the 10th annual South Hamilton Elementary Third Grade Historical Wax Museum.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 3, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - John Wilkes Booth took aim at the back of the president's head, then stood stock still for a few minutes as a narrator recounted the events of Abraham Lincoln's assassination. Having taken his "One small step for (a) man. One giant leap for mankind," Neil Armstrong stared off into the universe as a group of students listened to a retelling of the 1969 lunar landing. Those were two American moments brought to still life Monday at the 10th annual South Hamilton Elementary Third Grade Historical Wax Museum.
NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | May 28, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com SHARPSBURG - Gavin Williams sat on a bench in front of Sharpsburg Town Hall Saturday morning waiting for the Memorial Day celebrations to start. "They really got the spirit that all the towns used to have," he said. The spirit Williams spoke of was the true meaning of Memorial Day - remembering those who died in the nation's service. "The parking lot at Wal-Mart will be jammed this morning, but people can't take the time to come to something like this," said Williams, 77, an Army veteran from Charles Town, W.Va.
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