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NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 2, 2006
An urn reported stolen from a Hagerstown woman's home in April was returned to her Tuesday after a Hagerstown Police Department detective found it hidden under some branches near railroad tracks in City Park. Detective Jason Ackerman said an anonymous tip led him to the urn, which still contained the cremated remains of Joyce Rhodes' daughter, Tina Hawn Cafferio. No charges have been filed, he said. Rhodes reported that the urn, a laptop and some keys were stolen from her apartment in the 200 block of Summit Avenue in early April.
NEWS
By MARY CAROL GARRITY / Scripps Howard News Service | December 18, 2009
If you want a versatile tool that will help you create sensational holiday displays both inside and out, look no further than the humble garden urn. Urns are on my short list of must-haves for year-round decorating, but during the holidays, they are an absolute essential for holding showy displays you can pull together in a snap. Here are a few ways you can use urns to dress up your home for the season: TAKE IT OUTSIDE: I owe a debt of gratitude to the person who invented the black iron garden urn, because this stylish holder has become my favorite way to bring holiday cheer to my porch and courtyard.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | April 13, 2006
Most of the time, Joyce Rhodes' daughter stayed in the living room. When her birthday came, Rhodes would light a candle and place it upon the coffee table beside her. Sometimes, Rhodes took her daughter to another room, but only when she needed company. Tina Hawn Cafferio is dead, but Rhodes kept her memory alive. Looking upon a marble urn that held her daughter's cremated remains "was like having her with me," Rhodes said Tuesday, as her eyes filled with tears. On April 5, someone stole the urn, a laptop that contained pictures of Cafferio's four children and some keys from Rhodes' apartment in the 200 block of Summit Avenue.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
Family members of the victims of Russell Wayne Wagner, a convicted murderer who died in February at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup, Md., want the urn containing Wagner's ashes removed from Arlington National Cemetery. See Friday's Herald-Mail newspapers for the full story.âEURº
NEWS
June 12, 1997
City women held on drug charges A Hagerstown woman facing drug charges was being held on $50,000 bond at the Washington County Detention Center Wednesday. Peggy Jane Cauffman, 34, of 21517 Leitersburg-Smithsburg Road, was charged Wednesday with possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute, possession of a controlled dangerous substance and five counts of possession of controlled dangerous substance paraphernalia, according to the Washington County Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | May 5, 2003
Location, location, location is a factor in the cost of a final resting place. Costs vary in different areas, says Steven Sklar, director of the Maryland Office of Cemetery Oversight. The actual grave in which a body is interred costs about $1,000 to $3,000, Sklar says. You are not paying for the real estate. "You are buying the right of putting a human inside," he explains. And there are costs for opening and closing it - about $1,000. With the ground, you need a vault or a liner, typically made of reinforced concrete, or plastic materials.
NEWS
February 5, 2002
Mail Call for 2/4 "To the person who was complaining about the newspaper putting an article in about praising Bush's speech. They said they didn't like the newspaper and when their 80 year old person in their home was gone so would the paper and that you would be getting your news from the Internet. Would you please put your name and address in the paper so I can send you a cheese basket to go with your whine. " "To my nephew, Jason and to Jennifer, as you start your new life out together, on your wedding day, Feb. 1. Welcome to the family Jennifer, love Aunt Sissy, Uncle Junior, Jennifer and Johnny.
NEWS
November 26, 2007
BUNKER HILL, W. Va. - The Berkeley County CEOS recently completed a project called Pay It Forward. A yard sale held in August raised $500. Nine community CEOS clubs each were given $50 from the proceeds. The individual clubs were instructed to spend the $50 in the community. The money could be donated to the community in several ways - the individual clubs could add to the amount and donate it, they could donate it outright to an organization or family in need, or they could use the money to purchase supplies for projects that then could be donated once they were completed.
NEWS
By MARY CAROL GARRITY / Scripps Howard News Service | December 18, 2009
The last thing on my mind during the busy December when we opened Nell Hill's Briarcliff was decorating my home for the holidays. I was working a zillion hours a week getting the new store ready and had no energy left to deck the halls at home. But when Dec. 24 rolled around, I looked at my cheerless house and knew I couldn't bear to let Christmas come without some fanfare. So a few hours before guests were due to arrive, I did an instant holiday makeover. I hung a few stockings, pulled together a quick centerpiece on my dining-room table, filled some urns with tree ornaments and placed them on side tables, and hung some wreaths from the windowsills in my living room.
OPINION
December 23, 2012
The traditional wish for Christmas peace is all the more poig-nant in this, what has been a most divisive and unsettling year. We have survived another campaign year - not gracefully perhaps, but we survived nonetheless. Just this month, we have witnessed one of the more unthinkable tragedies in the nation's history. And locally, we are once again wrestling with the same old issues that have plagued Hagerstown for decades, even ones that we thought we had just recently, finally, put to rest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 23, 2012
The traditional wish for Christmas peace is all the more poig-nant in this, what has been a most divisive and unsettling year. We have survived another campaign year - not gracefully perhaps, but we survived nonetheless. Just this month, we have witnessed one of the more unthinkable tragedies in the nation's history. And locally, we are once again wrestling with the same old issues that have plagued Hagerstown for decades, even ones that we thought we had just recently, finally, put to rest.
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NEWS
By MARY CAROL GARRITY / Scripps Howard News Service | December 18, 2009
The last thing on my mind during the busy December when we opened Nell Hill's Briarcliff was decorating my home for the holidays. I was working a zillion hours a week getting the new store ready and had no energy left to deck the halls at home. But when Dec. 24 rolled around, I looked at my cheerless house and knew I couldn't bear to let Christmas come without some fanfare. So a few hours before guests were due to arrive, I did an instant holiday makeover. I hung a few stockings, pulled together a quick centerpiece on my dining-room table, filled some urns with tree ornaments and placed them on side tables, and hung some wreaths from the windowsills in my living room.
NEWS
By MARY CAROL GARRITY / Scripps Howard News Service | December 18, 2009
If you want a versatile tool that will help you create sensational holiday displays both inside and out, look no further than the humble garden urn. Urns are on my short list of must-haves for year-round decorating, but during the holidays, they are an absolute essential for holding showy displays you can pull together in a snap. Here are a few ways you can use urns to dress up your home for the season: TAKE IT OUTSIDE: I owe a debt of gratitude to the person who invented the black iron garden urn, because this stylish holder has become my favorite way to bring holiday cheer to my porch and courtyard.
NEWS
November 26, 2007
BUNKER HILL, W. Va. - The Berkeley County CEOS recently completed a project called Pay It Forward. A yard sale held in August raised $500. Nine community CEOS clubs each were given $50 from the proceeds. The individual clubs were instructed to spend the $50 in the community. The money could be donated to the community in several ways - the individual clubs could add to the amount and donate it, they could donate it outright to an organization or family in need, or they could use the money to purchase supplies for projects that then could be donated once they were completed.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 2, 2006
An urn reported stolen from a Hagerstown woman's home in April was returned to her Tuesday after a Hagerstown Police Department detective found it hidden under some branches near railroad tracks in City Park. Detective Jason Ackerman said an anonymous tip led him to the urn, which still contained the cremated remains of Joyce Rhodes' daughter, Tina Hawn Cafferio. No charges have been filed, he said. Rhodes reported that the urn, a laptop and some keys were stolen from her apartment in the 200 block of Summit Avenue in early April.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | April 13, 2006
Most of the time, Joyce Rhodes' daughter stayed in the living room. When her birthday came, Rhodes would light a candle and place it upon the coffee table beside her. Sometimes, Rhodes took her daughter to another room, but only when she needed company. Tina Hawn Cafferio is dead, but Rhodes kept her memory alive. Looking upon a marble urn that held her daughter's cremated remains "was like having her with me," Rhodes said Tuesday, as her eyes filled with tears. On April 5, someone stole the urn, a laptop that contained pictures of Cafferio's four children and some keys from Rhodes' apartment in the 200 block of Summit Avenue.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
Family members of the victims of Russell Wayne Wagner, a convicted murderer who died in February at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup, Md., want the urn containing Wagner's ashes removed from Arlington National Cemetery. See Friday's Herald-Mail newspapers for the full story.âEURº
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | May 5, 2003
Location, location, location is a factor in the cost of a final resting place. Costs vary in different areas, says Steven Sklar, director of the Maryland Office of Cemetery Oversight. The actual grave in which a body is interred costs about $1,000 to $3,000, Sklar says. You are not paying for the real estate. "You are buying the right of putting a human inside," he explains. And there are costs for opening and closing it - about $1,000. With the ground, you need a vault or a liner, typically made of reinforced concrete, or plastic materials.
NEWS
February 5, 2002
Mail Call for 2/4 "To the person who was complaining about the newspaper putting an article in about praising Bush's speech. They said they didn't like the newspaper and when their 80 year old person in their home was gone so would the paper and that you would be getting your news from the Internet. Would you please put your name and address in the paper so I can send you a cheese basket to go with your whine. " "To my nephew, Jason and to Jennifer, as you start your new life out together, on your wedding day, Feb. 1. Welcome to the family Jennifer, love Aunt Sissy, Uncle Junior, Jennifer and Johnny.
NEWS
June 12, 1997
City women held on drug charges A Hagerstown woman facing drug charges was being held on $50,000 bond at the Washington County Detention Center Wednesday. Peggy Jane Cauffman, 34, of 21517 Leitersburg-Smithsburg Road, was charged Wednesday with possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute, possession of a controlled dangerous substance and five counts of possession of controlled dangerous substance paraphernalia, according to the Washington County Sheriff's Department.
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