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Urban Sprawl

NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 24, 1998
Glendening announces $1.4 million for downtown work Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening formally announced Monday the state would spend nearly $1.4 million on street improvements in downtown Hagerstown. New sidewalks, resurfaced streets, landscaping and other projects will be part of the work, which is scheduled to start in spring of next year and be completed by the following fall. "If we want to see the downtown areas thrive, than the state must be willing to say, 'That is where our focus is going to be,'" Glendening said during an afternoon ceremony at Public Square.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | May 25, 1999
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Kate DiServio says Charles Town needs to start preparing for urban sprawl now. DiServio, who lived in Northern Virginia for 15 years before moving here, said bustling areas such as Virginia's Rosslyn and Crystal City had to be redesigned because they did not have adequate pedestrian areas and green space. One of three candidates running Thursday for an unexpired term on the Charles Town City Council, DiServio said she wants to make sure Charles Town does not suffer the same fate.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | July 25, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Urban sprawl might be one of the biggest threats to wildlife. But that wasn't the case Saturday, when a tarantula, a hedgehog and a boa constrictor appeared in downtown Hagerstown. Though they rattled a few nerves, they were met, for the most part, with open arms. It was all part of Wildlife Adventures, an interactive program designed to teach young people about the nature of animals, stewardship of the environment and personal character development. The presentation was held at the Washington County Free Library as a midway celebration of the library's summer reading program.
NEWS
by DAN DEARTH | March 13, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Washington County residents turned out Monday night to oppose a Hagerstown man's request to rezone his property to allow the possible construction of a strip mall between I-70 and U.S. 40 east of Hagerstown. About 25 of the 100 people who attended a joint meeting of the Washington County Commissioners and Washington County Planning Commission expressed their disapproval. None of the speakers supported Kent N. Oliver's proposal to rezone 60 acres near Beaver Creek and White Hall roads from agricultural to highway-interchange usage.
NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | March 5, 2002
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Brian and Mary Millin sat in the back of the room with their three small children. Their twins fidgeted as all 2-year-olds do. The Millins, who live on Edgemont Road, were at the Washington Township Supervisors meeting Monday night as part of a show of force. They and about 60 of their fellow township residents sat silently in the meeting room, their signs speaking for them. They were there to show unity in the fight against Glen Afton Estates - 133 single-family homes and 33 duplexes to be built on 138 acres of farm fields in their Harbaugh Church Road neighborhood.
NEWS
December 23, 1999
Tobacco money belongs to us To the editor: The tobacco company money which will come from the tobacco lawsuit settlement does not belong to the state government, it belongs to us. For anyone who does not remember, the tobacco lawsuits were explained to us as a way to recover money which we had to spend to take care of extra medical needs of smokers. This money did not come from the state, it came from us. We paid higher taxes to meet these expenses. Since the lawsuit settlement is supposed to do justice to those who have been forced to spend extra money, unjustly, it follows that this money should be returned to those who spent it. Remember, we are not discussing trivial sums here.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 7, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com The Huntfield development, a planned community that is the first of its kind in Jefferson County, is attracting a lot of attention from house hunters. The size of the development and its potential impact on the surrounding area have been at the center of many discussions since it was announced three years ago. Huntfield is expected to contain just under 3,800 homes and will include commercial areas that offer grocery stores and other shops.
NEWS
May 8, 2005
Lewis C. Metzner Democrat Age: 52 Address: East Irvin Avenue Occupation: Criminal defense lawyer 1. With 10 candidates to choose from, why should voters select you as a member of the City Council? I am proud to have been a part of three administrations which all had the same goal - to improve our city. Our downtown is in a state of rebirth and its potential for success has never been greater. We have the most open relationship with county government in the city's modern history.
NEWS
By ASHLEY HARTMAN | September 6, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The Washington Township Board of Supervisors denied by a 3-2 vote West End Development's request to rezone 15 acres of a cornfield from agricultural to low-density residential (R-1) during a public hearing Wednesday night. The decision came after hearing testimony from six residents and Ronnie Martin, a representative of the developer. The land, behind Frick and Tritle Avenues in Waynesboro, would expand the Walnut Knolls development. Supervisors Christopher Firme, John Gorman and Chairman Carroll C. Sturm voted to deny the rezoning request, while Supervisors Paul Benchoff and Stewart McCleaf voted to allow it. During a Washington Township Planning Commission meeting in July, in which the commission also denied the rezoning request, Martin said that rezoning the land would allow the developer to build on smaller lots than the two-acre minimum permitted in agricultural zones.
NEWS
January 9, 2007
Democratic leaders who rejected slot machines as a partial solution to Maryland's financial woes now say they want to overhaul the state's tax structure to generate more revenue. Washington County needs to join with other rural counties to make certain that any restructuring is based on what is fair and logical, as opposed to what areas with political clout can force on the rest of the state. Top lawmakers and business leaders are leaning toward an appointed commission that would study how citizens and businesses are taxed.
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