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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | December 28, 2010
Twenty-five years ago, community leaders were asked to predict what they thought Washington County would be like in 2010. Those making the predictions in 1985 at the request of The Herald-Mail envisioned urban sprawl, technology playing a major role in classrooms and a decrease in manufacturing jobs, among other things. They got a lot right, including the predictions of growth and urban sprawl. And they got a few things wrong. For instance, John P. Corderman, who at the time was a Washington County Circuit judge, predicted that Mack Trucks would have left the county.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 19, 2007
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Businesses with so-called "big box" stores, which sometimes draw the ire of people over fears of what they will do to a local economy, are not doing anything wrong when they set up shop, an expert on land planning said Monday. The companies are simply following laws that allow for such development, said Chad Emerson, an expert on the SmartCode approach of land use. A daylong meeting was held Monday at the Shepherdstown Men's Club, allowing local residents, land-use planners and government officials to learn more about the SmartCode approach.
NEWS
August 25, 2004
Landowners have only a few days to file applications for the Grassland Reserve Program administered by the USDA's Farm Service Agency and Natural Resource Conservation Services. Friday is the deadline to submit grassland offers and have them considered for 2004 fiscal year funding. In Maryland, more than $170,000 is available to qualifying applicants. The program "helps preserve and conserve our nation's grasslands by providing financial and technical assistance to the landowners," said Colleen Cashell, executive director of the Farm Service Agency in Washington County.
NEWS
by DAN DEARTH | June 6, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Washington County Commissioners must approve expanding the Urban Growth Area on the City of Hagerstown's southeast side before the City Council can consider extending water and sewer lines there for a proposed shopping mall, the city planning director said. Kathleen Maher discussed the issue during a Tuesday City Council work session. To build a shopping mall, she said the land's zoning would have to change from agricultural to highway-interchange usage, which allows for industrial and retail business.
NEWS
by JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Commissioners today will discuss whether they want to allow a shopping mall to be built near the intersection of U.S. 40 and Interstate 70. In order for the project to move forward, the commissioners must approve the rezoning of 60 acres south of and adjacent to I-70 between Beaver Creek and White Hall roads. The property's owner, Kent Oliver, has asked that the land be added to the county's urban growth area and rezoned from agricultural to highway-interchange usage to allow the construction of a shopping mall.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
Landowners have less than a month to submit applications for the Grassland Reserve Program, administered jointly by the USDA's Farm Service Agency and the Natural Resources Conservation Service. The deadline is Aug. 26 to submit GRP offers and have them considered for funding in September. This year, Maryland has $133,200 available for qualifying applicants. "The voluntary Grassland Reserve Program provides an excellent opportunity for landowners to preserve and conserve our nation's grasslands," said Elizabeth Anderson, executive director for the Maryland Farm Service Agency.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 16, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Commissioners today will discuss whether they want to allow a shopping mall to be built near the intersection of U.S. 40 and Interstate 70. In order for the project to move forward, the commissioners must approve the rezoning of 60 acres south of and adjacent to I-70 between Beaver Creek and White Hall roads. The property's owner, Kent Oliver, has asked that the land be added to the county's urban growth area and rezoned from agricultural to highway-interchange usage to allow the construction of a shopping mall.
NEWS
August 31, 2007
Let's protect our rural culture To the editor: Rural Americans in Maryland have come to the "valley of decision. " The Herald-Mail recently reported that the rural town of Walkersville is considering a zoning ordinance that could block plans for annual gatherings by thousands of members of the Ahmadiyyah Muslim sect. On the same page, another article announced that Maryland's highest court is scheduled to hear a dispute over a 4,300-unit development near Green Ridge State Forest in Western Maryland.
NEWS
December 29, 2010
As we did back in 1985, The Herald-Mail recently asked community leaders to predict what Washington County will be like  25 years from now. The following are their visions for 2035: Elizabeth Morgan Superintendent Washington County Public Schools  Morgan provided perhaps the most startling prediction, suggesting a major change in education would take place over the next 25 years. "We're going to return to one-room schoolhouses," Morgan said. She said that by 2035, schools will be in the form of telecommuting centers across the county, where students will learn virtually.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | May 2, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Pennsylvania is a key migration route for raptors, waterfowl and song birds as they head from the Arctic tundra to the tropics of South America and Mexico, an expert on birds told a small crowd at Renfrew Institute Thursday night. "One day in 1969, 4,000 hawks and eagles were counted over Hawk Mountain," said Steve Hoffman, the director of bird conservation of Audubon Pennsylvania in Harrisburg, Pa. Hawk Mountain, a site north of Allentown, Pa., draws more than 80,000 visitors during the migration period from August through December, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 24, 2013
“In today's Herald-Mail (Jan. 16), three letters appeared on the Opinion page that everyone should take the time to read. One was written by Gina Anders of Shepherdstown, W.Va., one by Michael Karn of Hagerstown, and one by Ned A. Garrett of Hagerstown. I just wanted to commend these three writers on their excellent letters. Truer words were never spoken. It's not very often you find three excellent letters in the same issue, and if you haven't already read these letters, go back and take the time to read them.” - Hagerstown “I was just reading the Wednesday, Jan. 16, paper, and quite frankly, I am shocked that the BOE is shocked by the teen pregnancy rate, and that kids are sexually active as young as 8 years old. I know the BOE members come and go, but come on, you would have had to have your head in the sand not to have seen this coming.
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NEWS
October 29, 2012
What are the biggest challenges to agriculture today? I get asked that question a lot and I find that while the orders of the answer change, the primary answers don't. When I say the order, I mean the order of importance. For instance, a few years ago when the building boom was in full swing, urban sprawl would have been much higher on the list in the Mid-Atlantic region than it is today. That is not to say the urban sprawl is still not a concern. At last glance, they aren't making any more land, and for some reason, prime farm land is also prime development land.
NEWS
December 29, 2010
As we did back in 1985, The Herald-Mail recently asked community leaders to predict what Washington County will be like  25 years from now. The following are their visions for 2035: Elizabeth Morgan Superintendent Washington County Public Schools  Morgan provided perhaps the most startling prediction, suggesting a major change in education would take place over the next 25 years. "We're going to return to one-room schoolhouses," Morgan said. She said that by 2035, schools will be in the form of telecommuting centers across the county, where students will learn virtually.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | December 28, 2010
Twenty-five years ago, community leaders were asked to predict what they thought Washington County would be like in 2010. Those making the predictions in 1985 at the request of The Herald-Mail envisioned urban sprawl, technology playing a major role in classrooms and a decrease in manufacturing jobs, among other things. They got a lot right, including the predictions of growth and urban sprawl. And they got a few things wrong. For instance, John P. Corderman, who at the time was a Washington County Circuit judge, predicted that Mack Trucks would have left the county.
NEWS
August 31, 2007
Let's protect our rural culture To the editor: Rural Americans in Maryland have come to the "valley of decision. " The Herald-Mail recently reported that the rural town of Walkersville is considering a zoning ordinance that could block plans for annual gatherings by thousands of members of the Ahmadiyyah Muslim sect. On the same page, another article announced that Maryland's highest court is scheduled to hear a dispute over a 4,300-unit development near Green Ridge State Forest in Western Maryland.
NEWS
by JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - The Washington County Commissioners today will discuss whether they want to allow a shopping mall to be built near the intersection of U.S. 40 and Interstate 70. In order for the project to move forward, the commissioners must approve the rezoning of 60 acres south of and adjacent to I-70 between Beaver Creek and White Hall roads. The property's owner, Kent Oliver, has asked that the land be added to the county's urban growth area and rezoned from agricultural to highway-interchange usage to allow the construction of a shopping mall.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | July 16, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Commissioners today will discuss whether they want to allow a shopping mall to be built near the intersection of U.S. 40 and Interstate 70. In order for the project to move forward, the commissioners must approve the rezoning of 60 acres south of and adjacent to I-70 between Beaver Creek and White Hall roads. The property's owner, Kent Oliver, has asked that the land be added to the county's urban growth area and rezoned from agricultural to highway-interchange usage to allow the construction of a shopping mall.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 19, 2007
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Businesses with so-called "big box" stores, which sometimes draw the ire of people over fears of what they will do to a local economy, are not doing anything wrong when they set up shop, an expert on land planning said Monday. The companies are simply following laws that allow for such development, said Chad Emerson, an expert on the SmartCode approach of land use. A daylong meeting was held Monday at the Shepherdstown Men's Club, allowing local residents, land-use planners and government officials to learn more about the SmartCode approach.
NEWS
by DAN DEARTH | June 6, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Washington County Commissioners must approve expanding the Urban Growth Area on the City of Hagerstown's southeast side before the City Council can consider extending water and sewer lines there for a proposed shopping mall, the city planning director said. Kathleen Maher discussed the issue during a Tuesday City Council work session. To build a shopping mall, she said the land's zoning would have to change from agricultural to highway-interchange usage, which allows for industrial and retail business.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
Landowners have less than a month to submit applications for the Grassland Reserve Program, administered jointly by the USDA's Farm Service Agency and the Natural Resources Conservation Service. The deadline is Aug. 26 to submit GRP offers and have them considered for funding in September. This year, Maryland has $133,200 available for qualifying applicants. "The voluntary Grassland Reserve Program provides an excellent opportunity for landowners to preserve and conserve our nation's grasslands," said Elizabeth Anderson, executive director for the Maryland Farm Service Agency.
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