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Unexploded Ordnance

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NEWS
May 24, 1999
By BRENDAN KIRBY / Staff Writer photo: RICHARD T. MEAGHER / staff photographer FORT RITCHIE - Inside Bill Hofmann's office is a bucket of decades-old flares and rusted World War I-era mortar shells, a small reminder of the mountain of work that faces Army officials as they prepare to hand over control of the former base to civilian authorities. [cont. from front page ] Hofmann, the post's environmental coordinator, was largely responsible for the plan to remove what Army officials call "unexploded ordnance" that lurks below the surface on as much as half of the 638-acre base.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | October 11, 2007
BARDANE, W.Va. - Thirty-four employees at a Jefferson County manufacturing facility are working to make life safer in Asia. War-torn countries like Lao People's Democratic Republic and Tajikistan must deal with the presence of explosives left over from violence that occurred as long as 40 years ago. It is estimated that 50 to 100 people are killed every day in the world from "unexploded ordnance" and experts say it will be a long process to...
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 24, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com About 100 families living in apartments on the former Fort Ritchie Army base will have to move as work on the base's unexploded ordnance cleanup continues, Bill Hofmann, base realignment and closure environmental coordinator, said Tuesday. The residents would not have had to move under the original plans for the cleanup. But the size of the area being examined for live rounds was increased by 38 acres after a finding last year, Hofmann said. The apartments are built on top of fill material that was taken from the base of a mountain that was a former target of a shooting range, Hofmann said.
NEWS
March 9, 2001
Company works to calm fear of weapons cleanup at fort By SCOTT BUTKI scottb@herald-mail.com The Maryland firm contracted to remove unexploded ordnance at Fort Ritchie is gathering information to address citizen concerns about the operation. The ordnance is on a 212-acre section of the former U.S. Army base that has been targeted for business development. IT Group of Edgewood, Md., was contracted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Army to conduct the cleanup at the 638-acre base.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | December 4, 1999
CASCADE - Plans to transform Fort Ritchie into a technology park could be abandoned due to complications caused by unexploded ordnance on the property. Three Washington County Commissioners said last week they are ready to pull the plug on the state-created PenMar Development Corp. if problems and complications with the Army over the issue aren't resolved within six months. "We will not accept that property with the conditions that have been put on it," Commissioners President Gregory I. Snook said.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | June 24, 2004
tarar@herald-mail.com About 100 families living at the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base have been asked to move to the other side of the base so the Army can look for and remove any buried explosives. Rich Rook, PenMar Development Corporation executive director, met Wednesday night at the former base with families living on West Rekord Avenue and Mountain Road to discuss the relocation. PenMar was created by the state in 1997 to redevelop the base, which the Army shut down in 1998.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | December 18, 1999
A meeting last week between the PenMar Development Corp. and the U.S. Army failed to end an impasse over plans and restrictions obstructing PenMar's goal of redeveloping Fort Ritchie for commercial and residential usage. "We got nowhere," James A. LaFleur, executive director of PenMar, said Friday. "The only thing we agreed on is to meet again. " No date has been set to meet, he said. The quasi-public organization was created by the Maryland General Assembly in May 1997 to replace the 2,000 jobs lost when the base in northeastern Washington County closed in September 1998.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | November 29, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com CASCADE - A contractor turned up about 107,000 metallic items while checking more than 200 acres on the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base for unexploded ordnance, Bill Hofmann, the Army Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator, said Monday. Cleanup work began in June 2001 and wrapped up for the year last week. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Army contracted with an Edgewood, Md., company to handle the cleanup work on 218 acres of the 638-acre base.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | October 2, 2000
Unexploded munititions to be removed A contractor for the U.S. Army will in the spring begin examining about 250 acres at Fort Ritchie to clean up any ordnance on the property, an Army official said Monday. The cleanup by IT Corp. of Edgewood, Md., is expected to take three years, said Bill Hofmann, the Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator. Raymond Fatz, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for environmental safety and occupational health, signed the document Friday authorizing the start of the cleanup efforts, Hofmann said.
NEWS
February 14, 2008
A chance to help children overseas To the editor: Children, farmers and others living in poor, war-torn nations such as Tajikistan, Somalia, Laos and Vietnam die or are maimed every day by land mines and unexploded ordnance. That's the bad news. Here's the good: There is something you can do to help. The young people at Mount Pleasant United Methodist Church in Gerrardstown, W.Va., are raising money to buy specialized equipment to find and remove these dangerous remnants of war. We hope many of you can come to our Chick-Fil-A "Spirit Night" on Monday, March 3. For everyone who takes part from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., we'll get 20 percent of the restaurant's proceeds to use for our project.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ANTIETAM
By DAVE MCMILLION | July 19, 2011
As if the Civil War itself wasn't traumatic enough for the country, the conflict continued to pose dangers after it ended, according to a local history expert. In the years immediately after the war, cannon shells and human remains dotted battlefields, said Dennis Frye, chief historian at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. In some instances, the artillery shells were live, posing dangers to people such as farmers plowing in what had been battle areas, Frye said. “If a plow hit this metal and sent a spark, you would be blown to bits,” said Frye.
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NEWS
February 14, 2008
A chance to help children overseas To the editor: Children, farmers and others living in poor, war-torn nations such as Tajikistan, Somalia, Laos and Vietnam die or are maimed every day by land mines and unexploded ordnance. That's the bad news. Here's the good: There is something you can do to help. The young people at Mount Pleasant United Methodist Church in Gerrardstown, W.Va., are raising money to buy specialized equipment to find and remove these dangerous remnants of war. We hope many of you can come to our Chick-Fil-A "Spirit Night" on Monday, March 3. For everyone who takes part from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., we'll get 20 percent of the restaurant's proceeds to use for our project.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | October 11, 2007
BARDANE, W.Va. - Thirty-four employees at a Jefferson County manufacturing facility are working to make life safer in Asia. War-torn countries like Lao People's Democratic Republic and Tajikistan must deal with the presence of explosives left over from violence that occurred as long as 40 years ago. It is estimated that 50 to 100 people are killed every day in the world from "unexploded ordnance" and experts say it will be a long process to...
NEWS
September 13, 2005
"This goes out to Douglas A. Fiery Funeral Home. Way to go! Way to step up and get things done. We thank you for your generousity and heart felt sincerity for doing what you can for the survivors of the hurricane. Keep up the good work. " - Washington County "My heart goes out to the lady who lost her dog because she had to take it to an emergency vet in Frederick. I, too, am very upset over this. All those who have animals and haven't received a letter from your vet, you'd better realize that there is no emergency care on weekends or after hours, so be prepared.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | June 24, 2004
tarar@herald-mail.com About 100 families living at the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base have been asked to move to the other side of the base so the Army can look for and remove any buried explosives. Rich Rook, PenMar Development Corporation executive director, met Wednesday night at the former base with families living on West Rekord Avenue and Mountain Road to discuss the relocation. PenMar was created by the state in 1997 to redevelop the base, which the Army shut down in 1998.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | November 29, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com CASCADE - A contractor turned up about 107,000 metallic items while checking more than 200 acres on the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base for unexploded ordnance, Bill Hofmann, the Army Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator, said Monday. Cleanup work began in June 2001 and wrapped up for the year last week. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Army contracted with an Edgewood, Md., company to handle the cleanup work on 218 acres of the 638-acre base.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 24, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com About 100 families living in apartments on the former Fort Ritchie Army base will have to move as work on the base's unexploded ordnance cleanup continues, Bill Hofmann, base realignment and closure environmental coordinator, said Tuesday. The residents would not have had to move under the original plans for the cleanup. But the size of the area being examined for live rounds was increased by 38 acres after a finding last year, Hofmann said. The apartments are built on top of fill material that was taken from the base of a mountain that was a former target of a shooting range, Hofmann said.
NEWS
April 4, 2001
Ordnance removal begins in June By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI kimy@herald-mail.com CASCADE - About 50 people heard from military and environmental officials Tuesday about plans to remove unexploded ordnance and clean up Fort Ritchie. IT Group of Edgewood, Md. was contracted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Army to remove the unexploded mortars, bombs and rockets at the 638-acre base. "We're looking forward to the revitalization of the Cascade community," said Jennifer Gaskill, community relations manager for IT Group, at the public meeting at the Cascade American Legion.
NEWS
March 9, 2001
Company works to calm fear of weapons cleanup at fort By SCOTT BUTKI scottb@herald-mail.com The Maryland firm contracted to remove unexploded ordnance at Fort Ritchie is gathering information to address citizen concerns about the operation. The ordnance is on a 212-acre section of the former U.S. Army base that has been targeted for business development. IT Group of Edgewood, Md., was contracted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Army to conduct the cleanup at the 638-acre base.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | October 2, 2000
Unexploded munititions to be removed A contractor for the U.S. Army will in the spring begin examining about 250 acres at Fort Ritchie to clean up any ordnance on the property, an Army official said Monday. The cleanup by IT Corp. of Edgewood, Md., is expected to take three years, said Bill Hofmann, the Base Realignment and Closure environmental coordinator. Raymond Fatz, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for environmental safety and occupational health, signed the document Friday authorizing the start of the cleanup efforts, Hofmann said.
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