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Train Station

NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | January 10, 2007
HAGERSTOWN Jerry Sibert dreamed of developing a small Western town for children to visit and he spent a lifetime collecting Civil War-era memorabilia. Faced with declining health and the heartbreak of being robbed five times, Sibert gave up on the dream and sold the antiques that would stock a general store. A New Jersey man on Wednesday sent assistants to pick up many of the items, including a hearse that Sibert says was used to take Abraham Lincoln from the White House to his funeral train.
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NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER | November 20, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - For most of the week, the old rail station on the corner of Carlisle and Railroad streets in Greencastle appears as it has for decades, a vacant shell of the past. Once a hub of this small industrial town, the rail station no longer echoes with the whistles of incoming trains. But for three days each week, the station comes alive, and the wood and brick resound with the rhythm of hammering and sawing. For almost two months, Praying Time Ministries has been working to renovate the old building and make it the new site of its church.
NEWS
April 22, 2006
St. John's Episcopal Church, Hagerstown, the Rev. Scott Bellows will preach at the 8 and 10:15 a.m. communion services this Sunday. Judy Myers and Robin Spickler will bring music at the later service. Christian education is at 9 a.m. St. Mark's Lutheran Church, the Rev. David B. Kaplan will be preaching this Sunday at the 10:30 a.m. service on the topic, Easter Outreach. Sunday school for all ages begins at 9:15 a.m. St. Paul's United Methodist Church, Smithsburg, Pastor Mark Mooney will preach at the 9:30 a.m. service this Sunday on the topic, Needy People Please Apply.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | December 20, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - The old, one-pint glass bottle still has some dirt on it and has embossed around its upper edge the warning, "Federal law forbids sale or re-use of this bottle. " The brown bottle, likely more than 70 years old, was found underneath the historic train station in Harpers Ferry, which is being restored. Recently, the station was elevated 6 feet off the ground while a construction crew builds a new concrete foundation and adds a new floor to the circa-1894 building.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | November 27, 2005
tiffanya@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Trainfest, held at the Washington County Agricultural Center this year, put the Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum closer to its financial goal. The annual fundraiser for the museum drew 45 vendors and hundreds of model train enthusiasts from the Tri-State area. The museum has been raising money to renovate Antietam Station, a historic rail station in Sharpsburg. Museum treasurer Bob Morningstar said Saturday the museum has raised about $140,000.
NEWS
By Lyn Widmyer | November 27, 2005
I learned a very important fact at the opening of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Advanced Training Center in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. The commuter parking lot at Harpers Ferry will remain open while the train station is renovated. None of the speakers actually addressed this important topic. Robert Bonner, commissioner of something to do with homeland security, explained the Advanced Training Center will help keep our nation's borders safe and secure. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.
NEWS
by Lydia Hadfield | September 20, 2005
What do you think when you hear the name Shakespeare? For many, Shakespeare brings to mind stodgy academics, abstruse language and moldy books. However, the Shakespeare Generation thinks differently. Based in Shepherdstown, W.Va., the Shakespeare Generation is a theater company composed entirely of people younger than 21 years old. Clara Rubertas and Sarah Thomas, both 14 at the time, created the Shakespeare Generation in January 2000. Since then, the company has secured grants from The Arts and Humanities Alliance of Jefferson County and produced nine Shakespeare productions.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | August 3, 2005
SHARPSBURG daniels@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown Model Railroad Museum Inc. was dealt yet another obstacle late last month in its efforts to convert the former Antietam Station west of Sharpsburg into a showcase for model railroad displays. Citing personal and work-related time constraints, Museum President Blair Williamson resigned his post. Williamson said he was disappointed he was not able to preside over a public opening of the museum, which he says is unlikely to occur this year.
NEWS
by TONY BUDNY | August 1, 2005
CHEWSVILLE anthonyb@herald-mail.com For nearly 100 years, two cooperative organizations helped shape the community of Chewsville. The first cooperative was formed in the early 1870s, growing from a warehouse and shipping organization. The second cooperative was formed in 1930 and helped guide the community until the mid-1960s, according to local historical accounts. A. Romayne Miller, 86, was the former assistant manager for the second cooperative, known as Chewsville Co-operative Association.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | July 13, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - When skateboarders in Shepherdstown began fighting for their right to ride, Anne Walter helped give them a voice. After town officials started considering a ban on skateboarding in town, adults who supported the young skateboarders began showing up at Shepherdstown Town Council meetings to defend the kids. Supporters talked about the strong bond skateboarders had formed and said the kids would be lost if their pastime came to an end in town.
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