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Traffic Congestion

NEWS
January 7, 2005
Has there ever been a road project that's been studied more than the proposal to upgrade W.Va. 9? If so, we can't remember it. Given the dangerous nature of this road, which runs from the Virginia line west to Martinsburg, we're happy that the state of West Virginia has awarded contracts worth $32 million to upgrade the portion that passes through Jefferson County into a four-lane road. The latest awards will involve grading and drainage work and the construction of four bridges.
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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | September 24, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com While a planned new parking lot at Bester Elementary School is not expected to be completed until April 2005, two new options are being explored to address school traffic congestion problems, Washington County Public Schools spokeswoman Carol Mowen said Thursday. School system representatives plan to provide an update on the situation, as well as receive feedback, during an Oct. 4 meeting co-sponsored by the school's Citizens Advisory Committee and the Parent Teacher Association, Mowen said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | March 1, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com A 35-year-old Berkeley County man riding on a motorcycle was killed Saturday night when he attempted to pass a truck on Specs Run Road, the Berkeley County Sheriff's Department said. Kevin Eugene Green of Bunker Hill, W.Va., was killed in the 6:40 p.m. crash, according to a press release from the sheriff's department. The press release did not say where the accident occurred on Specs Run Road, which loops between W.Va. 51 and U.S. 11 in the Inwood, W.Va.
NEWS
by Sara Smith, Hagerstown | October 12, 2003
To the editor: It is high time to relieve all elitist government officials of their duties. I am struggling to see how these poorly educated people were elected in the first place. Within the last few months we have had Hagerstown Councilwoman Penny Nigh openly display her elitist attitudes by speaking against the less fortunate in the community who rely upon the Section 8 program as a way to provide adequate housing for themselves and their families. Now we are experiencing John Munson's hostility toward the County Commuter and the roughly 67,000 Washington County residents who use it. Mr. Munson, have you ever ridden a County Commuter?
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | September 30, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com A proposed $3 million extension of Eastern Boulevard on which traffic would bypass the busy intersection with Leitersburg Pike, the Hagerstown YMCA and a residential development under construction can't be built soon enough for Hagerstown officials but it might be a few years before that happens. "This is becoming more of an issue for the city as traffic in that area increases. It is not an emergency yet but we need to be planning for this," City Engineer Rodney Tissue said.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | March 6, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com The fear expressed Wednesday night by residents who will be affected by the proposed widening of Maugans Avenue from two lanes to five was that more road will just bring more traffic. A public informational meeting at Maugansville Elementary School drew close to 200 people as well as a half dozen Washington County officials including Gary Rohrer, director of public works, and Terry McGee, chief engineer. "We feel strongly about what we are proposing," Rohrer said.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | February 25, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Washington County officials will hold a public meeting this week to discuss the proposed $4.3 million widening of a stretch of Maugans Avenue to five lanes. The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Maugansville Elementary School. County officials plan to give an overview of the project, then answer questions. "Hopefully it'll be conducive and beneficial to everybody involved," Director of Public Works Gary Rohrer said last Wednesday.
NEWS
January 30, 2003
Just as you can't make an omelet without breaking eggs, it also seems you can't propose new road construction without getting some people upset. So it is with the proposed bypass of Martinsburg. W.Va. With nine options on the table, there should be one most people can live with. The trick will be preserving the bypass for its intended purpose after it's built. Officials of the Division of Highways who spoke at the work session held this week at Eagle School Intermediate said that the project should relieve traffic congestion in downtown Martinsburg and stop tie-ups due to regional traffic from W.Va.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 27, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - It happens about 3:30 p.m. every weekday and lasts until about 5 p.m. The traffic flowing along Queen Street through Martinsburg slows to a trickle as rush-hour traffic tries to make its way along the north and south route through town. Queen Street is actually U.S. 11, but it's no resemblance to a highway at this time, as traffic often becomes gridlocked, city officials say. "It's getting progressively worse.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | August 11, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com Most residents of Robinwood and Edgewood drives interviewed last week said they oppose Washington County Hospital moving near the Hagerstown Community College because there would be increased traffic on already busy roads. "It is going to make the street pretty congested," said Bert Berlinicke of 11621 Robinwood. The Robinwood area is one of three sites under consideration if Washington County Hospital rebuilds and leaves its location on East Antietam Street in Hagerstown.
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