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by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 20, 2003
gregs@herald-mail.com The fact that Steven Lawrence McCormick was already wearing an orange jail jumpsuit didn't make him any less nervous. Sitting at the defense table, he whispered to his lawyer, peeked over his shoulder at the jury pool behind him with a look that could be taken for anger or confusion, and whispered back to his lawyer. The jury was selected, but soon McCormick took an out. Instead of being tried before a jury he pleaded guilty to two counts of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute.
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NEWS
by DON AINES | July 5, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. -Before Pittsburgh became the steel producing center of Pennsylvania, much of that industry was in Franklin County, which in turn gave birth to related industries, according to Bill Helfrick, president of the Waynesboro Area Industrial Heritage Trust. "With foundry and casting and pattern making, of course, you need a source of metal," Helfrick said Sunday at the Waynesboro Industrial Museum. "This area had a lot of early furnaces, 13 of the 21 in Pennsylvania at one time.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | April 15, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - A program that will provide state funding for apprenticeship programs in construction trades was approved shortly before the Maryland General Assembly adjourned its 90-day session at midnight Monday. The legislation will help address the lack of qualified tradespeople in Washington County and other parts of the state, said Del. D. Bruce Poole, D-Washington, the bill's sponsor. "More than anything, what I want to bring back to Washington County is the hope of getting good jobs at good wages for people," Poole said.
NEWS
by EDWARD MARSHALL | July 26, 2002
edwardm@herald-mail.com Two members of the 35th graduating class of the Western Maryland Police Training Academy have already had a chance to put their training to the test. Deputy Fire Marshals Jamie Rodeheaver and Jason Mowbray graduated June 24 and are part of the team investigating the two-alarm blaze that erupted in an old warehouse complex on Security Road July 13. "They say arson is probably the most difficult crime to investigate," said Mowbray, 24, of Barton, Md. Mowbray and Rodeheaver are based in Hagerstown and serve Washington, Allegany and Garrett counties.
NEWS
April 21, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer Pick any measure of drug activity in Washington County and the arrow points straight up. Whether the category is arrests, court cases or amount of drugs seized, law enforcement officials have seen dramatic increases over the last five years. While the causes for the jump are complex and varied, the result is simple: The manpower and budgets of numerous agencies have been stretched close to the breaking point. County officials are quickly running out of court dates to prosecute offenders and jail space to house them.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | October 8, 2006
For a long time I have hesitated to write this column about Washington County Commissioner John Munson. This is true for a couple of reasons. The first is that as a Herald-Mail editorial said a year into his term, his oddball statements had already become so frequent that criticizing them had started to seem about as sporting as shooting a whitetail deer tied to a tree. The second is that sometimes writing a true story that portrays someone in an unflattering way creates sympathy for that person.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | February 27, 2000
HANCOCK - Hancock's longtime town clerk has decided to exit the fast lane. Juanita Grimm said for 16 years, she's sped the 62 round-trip miles on Interstate 70 to and from her home in Huyetts Crossroads and her job in Hancock. And it's time to slow down. Grimm's last day on the job in Hancock is Tuesday. She will take her new post as the town clerk in Clear Spring the following day, working alongside retiring clerk Nancy Keefer for three months. "Hancock is fast-paced," said Grimm, 34. "Clear Spring seems a lot more laid back.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | September 1, 1998
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - About 125 newly hired federal employees, some from as far as New Orleans, were in Shepherdstown Monday for a three-day training session to get them acquainted with the U.S. government. The workers are participating in The Presidential Management Intern Program, created in 1977 by former President Jimmy Carter to identify talented people for upper-level management positions with the government. The training is taking place in the newly opened Eastern Management Development Center along W.Va.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | June 8, 2004
marlob@herald-mail.com BOONSBORO - Born on a farm to a working farm family, Esther Gross always found time for her art, no matter how early she had to get up to milk the cows or work in the fields. Now, Gross no longer is tied to a farming schedule so she has a lot more time to devote to her muse. "I was always scribbling and drawing as a child," Gross said. "I remember people asking me to draw horses for them. I do good horses. " As proof, Gross produced a sketch of two horses that she drew more than 30 years ago. The detail and lines of the horses' heads were lifelike even after the passage of so much time.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 9, 2010
BOONSBORO - Ken and Diane Putman will be minding their own beeswax at this year's Boonesborough Days. Every steaming pound of it. This weekend, the Putmans will be moving their handmade beeswax candle-making operation, Millhouse Candles, from their historic Keedysville home to Shafer Memorial Park, as part of Boonesborough Days. They plan to demonstrate the old art of candle making. The festival is the Boonsboro Historical Society's attempt at showcasing the breadth of the town's history, said Wanda Heuer, organizer and Historical Society president.
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