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Trade

NEWS
By DAN KAUFFMAN | August 19, 2008
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - While they might never have their own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the Federal Little League 11-12 All-Stars are learning what it's like to be celebrities. At the Little League World Series, all the players are stars. "It's been pretty cool because all these little kids will come up to you and ask for their autograph," said Josh Moats. "It's been awesome. When I was a little kid, I'd always dream of coming up and playing here, and my dream has come true.
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NEWS
August 11, 2010
"I feel for the man that has three babies and they cater to the mother about him not getting child support. My daughter's father left for Michigan in November. I have been fighting for child support, and all's I get from the child support agency is 'Good luck, he is in Michigan and we cannot get him.' They have been catering to him also. He left Hagerstown ... left a $20-hour-something job. ... They did intercept his taxes, and he has a contempt of court hearing in September, but they say unless he does not show up for that, it depends on your case worker what they will do. " - Hagerstown "About the overgrown yards: Just have prisoners mow them, or better yet, have the mortgage companies that own the properties pay to have the yards mowed.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | December 26, 2010
Chalky, gritty, funny-shaped candies of old are Susan Benjamin's windows into history. And history never tasted so sweet. "Put this in your mouth and close your eyes," said Benjamin, an author, former journalist and, more recently, a candy researcher. "Now imagine you're very cold and you're fighting in the Civil War. You're in a ditch somewhere. This is what you may have been eating when you felt bad or needed some energy. That's the real flavor. " "How often do you get that?"
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 24, 2010
HAGERSTOWN -- Educators and business people on Monday celebrated a partnership that helps adults and teenagers learn trades. It's been about two years since the Cumberland Valley Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors moved its training program into the Barr Construction Institute on North Locust Street in Hagerstown. On Monday, teachers, students and supporters gathered there to share praise and success stories. Students Nick Hevener and Aaron Divel explained and demonstrated refrigeration and cooling to the lunch audience, which gathered in a tent for Partners in Education Appreciation Day. Anthony Shumaker evoked laughter from the crowd when he said, "The only reason I came to Barr was to get out of going to Clear Spring High School during the day. " But, as he learned more about heating, ventilation and air conditioning, Shumaker decided he liked it. He credited his teachers.
NEWS
December 4, 2000
Animal trade to be discussed at conference By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - More than 150 representatives from at least 19 countries are expected to meet at a federal training center here Thursday to discuss how to control international trade of wild animals and plants. The representatives are responsible for enforcing a treaty signed in 1973 in Washington, D.C., that controls international trade of protected species of animals and plants, said Pat Fisher, spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
October 2, 1998
Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, D-West Virginia, will speak about international trade issues at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13, at the Bavarian Inn in Shepherdstown, W.Va. He will focus on West Virginia's role in the emerging global economy. The event is sponsored by the West Virginia International Trade Development Council. The cost to attend the luncheon is $10 per person. Reservations must be made by Monday. To make a reservation, call Sandy Dubay at 1-304-728-3255.
NEWS
by ROBERT GARY | January 20, 2007
Trade has gotten away from us, and the reason is we have gotten away from trade. Strictly speaking, to trade is to exchange goods/services for other goods/services of equal value. Any transaction that is unbalanced can be partially trade, but must be partially the unilateral access of one party to the markets of the other. So if you sell me $1,000 worth of computers, and I sell you $1,000 worth of soybeans - that's trade. But if you sell me $1,000 worth of computers, and I only sell you $500 worth of soybeans - that's half trade and half my gift to you of $500 worth of access to my home market.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | July 20, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com Washington County received approval Friday for a Foreign Trade Zone, which will reduce or eliminate import taxes for some county businesses. The zone will comprise 1,866 acres in seven county locations, from an industrial complex in Hancock to a former army base in Cascade. "We're now getting into the big leagues with this," said U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., who announced the trade zone status at a news conference at Hagerstown Regional Airport, which is part of the zone.
NEWS
by LISA PREJEAN | May 19, 2006
I am known as "The Father of the Constitution. " Wisconsin's capital was named after me. At 5 feet 4 inches, I was the shortest president. Who am I? If you answered James Madison, congratulations. You are one step closer to being a President of the Day champion. Last fall, I challenged the fifth-graders in my class to a State of the Day contest. Then, in the winter, we had a Capital of the Day contest. This spring, we've been learning about the presidents in our President of the Day contest.
NEWS
By PEPPER BALLARD | June 13, 2004
SHARPSBURG -Although no construction was being performed Saturday at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, cranes, backhoes and excavators filled its grounds. More than 800 people showed up for the annual Cumberland Valley Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) trade show at the agricultural center, where suppliers showed off their most recent construction models, employers fielded questions about contract work and families feasted on food. Joyce Schill, 40, of Williamsport, said that she came to the show because her husband works for Building Systems Inc. and the couple thought the day would be fun. She watched as children flopped around in an inflated "moon" room placed on a grassy patch near the center's pavilions.
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