Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsTourism
IN THE NEWS

Tourism

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIFESTYLE
May 4, 2011
The Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau announces the arrival of its 2011 Visitor Guide. The 72-page guide includes maps of Hagerstown and Washington County, restaurant listings, demographics for each town and details about annual special events. There are focused articles highlighting the commemorations of the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Washington County's African American history, opportunities for agricultural adventures and bike routes. Convention and Visitors Bureau President Tom Riford said this year's Visitor Guide features a smaller, more portable size, colorful photography and a new design.
NEWS
April 26, 2010
CUMBERLAND, Md. (AP) -- Allegany County's tourism director says a ban on alcohol in state forest campgrounds is prompting some people to go elsewhere for outdoor fun. Barbara Buehl said Monday that a group of up to 40 people plans to hold its annual outing elsewhere if they can't drink beer around a campfire in a Maryland state forest. The Department of Natural Resources says it is formulating a response to western Maryland lawmakers who asked the agency in March to suspend the ban and hold a public hearing.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2011
The American Bus Association recently announced that the Civil War 150th commemoration of the Maryland Campaign, being held Sept. 8 to 22, 2012, has been designated as one of the top 100 events in North America for 2012 by a tourism industry selection committee. Inclusion in the top 100 list, published as a supplement to the September/October issue of Destinations magazine, indicates that the 150th commemoration of the Maryland Campaign offers value to tour groups and individual travelers from around the world, according to the ABA. “The 150th commemoration of the Maryland Campaign explores the impact of Gen. Robert E. Lee's first advance of the Confederate army into the north, crossing the Potomac into Maryland,” said Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area Director Liz Shatto.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | December 9, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT -- What can Williamsport do to capitalize on the tourism business? Does it need more bicycle racks? More ice cream parlors? Those were some of the ideas kicked around at a Williamsport Town Council meeting Monday night as the town now finds itself with a link to Pittsburgh. That link became possible when the C&O Canal Towpath, which runs past Williamsport, was connected to the Great Allegheny Passage, a 10-foot-wide trail built on old railroad corridors. The Great Allegheny Passage runs from Cumberland, Md., to Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | December 9, 2012
What once divided a nation turned into a big year for tourism in Washington County 150 years later. “2012 will probably go down in history as the busiest year, or at least one of the busiest years in the tourism industry in Washington County,” Tom Riford, president and CEO of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau said Friday. “We expect well over 2 million visitors who have come to this county during this year, and we also anticipate visitor spending to exceed $300 million.” The sesquicentennial celebrations of the Battles of Antietam and the Battle of South Mountain, both part of the Maryland Campaign of the Civil War in 1862, played a major role in the increase of visitors, which are defined as people who travel 50 miles or more into the county, according to Riford.
NEWS
by DAN DEARTH | February 16, 2007
FUNKSTOWN - The Funkstown Town Council will discuss during its Feb. 22 meeting ways to become eligible for state funding that could increase tourism, Councilwoman Sharon Chirgott said. Chirgott said the council wants to explore applying for money from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority, a state program that funds historic preservation and creates economic growth through tourism. Washington County planner Steve Goodrich said town officials must create a plan that comprises several criteria, including the goals and objectives of the preservation.
NEWS
May 21, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer Several Washington County Commissioners expressed concern Tuesday about the direction of the Convention and Visitors Bureau transition team. "I just see everything being destroyed under this transition team," said Commissioner Ronald L. Bowers. The commissioners questioned the transition team's intention to no longer support municipalities and local tourism activities and efforts, such as the MSO, Miss Maryland, Antietam Luminaires, HagerFest, Bluesfest and other events.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | December 12, 2008
HANCOCK - Hancock officials are talking about ways to capitalize on tourism business from the C&O Canal Towpath and the Great Allegheny Passage. The C&O Canal is now connected to the Great Allegheny Passage, a 10-foot wide trail that runs from Cumberland, Md., to Pittsburgh, and towns in Pennsylvania have benefited from tourism on the Great Allegheny Passage, officials have said. A woman who has worked in the tourism business on the Great Allegheny Passage told Williamsport Town Council members earlier this week that towns can perform assessments to gauge their readiness to benefit from tourism from the trails.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | October 23, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com Madeleine Snyder and her sister-in-law, Wanda Cunningham, had just begun their weekend shopping expedition Friday afternoon. "It's kind of a girls weekend. ... No guys," said Snyder, 49, with bags already piling at her feet on a bench at Prime Outlets. "Believe it or not, I'm not really a shopper," Snyder said. The two live about a half-hour from Charlottesville, Va., but this is their third trip to Hagerstown, which is 21/2 hours away.
NEWS
May 31, 2005
The Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau will host a training session on Wednesday for front-line tourism staffers. The free "familiarization tour" is an annual event. It assists hotels, restaurants and other tourism-related businesses by educating employees about Washington County. The purpose of "Washington County on the Road" is to familiarize local staff and management with the parks and attractions in Hagerstown-Washington County. "This helps the front-line staff person to relay accurate information to visitors, and it often leads to guests to our community staying extra nights," said Betsy De Vore, director of sales for the CVB. Employees of CVB member-businesses are welcome to attend to learn more about all of the sites, attractions, parks, museums and events in Washington County.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | June 13, 2013
Berkeley County officials are moving forward with a plan to have all of the county's museums open on the third weekend of each month as part of a coordinated heritage tourism promotion plan. Laura Gassler, director of the Martinsburg-Berkeley County Convention & Visitors Bureau, told board members Wednesday that the plan would allow tourists the opportunity to visit all of the county's museums as part of a day-long visit, if not stay overnight. Gassler said she and Berkeley County Historical Society President Todd Funkhouser have been working on the plan, which comes as county museums are “desperate for volunteers” to staff them.
Advertisement
LIFESTYLE
May 12, 2013
The Washington County Board of Commissioners proclaimed May 4 to 12 as Washington County Tourism Week after a presentation of the annual report by the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau. In Washington County, 6,700 people work in tourism jobs, visitors last year spent $300 million locally and lodging occupancy was up by more than 11 percent. Washington County led the state in tourism industry increases in 2012. From May 4 to 12, tourism industry professionals all over Maryland rallied in support of the benefits of travel as part of the 30th annual National Travel and Tourism Week.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 29, 2013
Smartphones and tablet devices will soon be helping people explore cultural, heritage and natural features in Franklin, Adams, Cumberland and York counties in Pennsylvania. The South Mountain Partnership debuted its new app Monday during an event at Totem Pole Playhouse. Users of the free app can watch a video touting the South Mountain region, learn more about points of interest, download one of five tours, or build a custom tour. “It's designed to work with the navigation system that is native to your phone,” said Janet Pollard, director of the Franklin County Visitors Bureau.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | April 13, 2013
Dwelling as we have of late on Downtown Hagerstown's cloudy future is all well and good, but at some point we might stop to remember that our inherent strength is changing over time. Instead of coming from the city, our economic engine is increasingly being fueled by the countryside - or any place or event that gets people out and about. Some recent statistics show just how much this is true. Tourism as measured by hotel occupancy rates was up 11.1 percent in 2012, three times higher than the the state's second-place county (Talbot)
NEWS
April 7, 2013
Washington County was the only one in Maryland that saw double-digit increases in hotel occupancy and lodging revenue during 2012, and it led the state in increased room demand, according to a biannual report from the Maryland Office of Tourism Development. The county saw a 9.3 percent rise in room demand, a 12.1 increase in room revenue and an 11.1 percent increase in hotel occupancy, the Maryland Lodging Monitor reported. Western Maryland's lodging gains outpaced those in Central Maryland.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | December 9, 2012
What once divided a nation turned into a big year for tourism in Washington County 150 years later. “2012 will probably go down in history as the busiest year, or at least one of the busiest years in the tourism industry in Washington County,” Tom Riford, president and CEO of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau said Friday. “We expect well over 2 million visitors who have come to this county during this year, and we also anticipate visitor spending to exceed $300 million.” The sesquicentennial celebrations of the Battles of Antietam and the Battle of South Mountain, both part of the Maryland Campaign of the Civil War in 1862, played a major role in the increase of visitors, which are defined as people who travel 50 miles or more into the county, according to Riford.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | November 27, 2012
On three acres of sloping Myersville gravelly loam, hundreds of young grape vines are maturing, waiting to yield their first harvest late next year. The ground near Smithsburg where the vineyard sits is, by soil composition, elevation, slope and climate, similar to what one would find in the Burgundy region of France, said Joe Fiola, a viticulture specialist with the University of Maryland Extension. Myersville gravelly loam, he noted, is the soil type and the limestone over shale substrata and slope allow the kind of drainage that produces excellent wine grapes.
OPINION
By BRAD SELL and JENNY FLEMING | November 25, 2012
At our last Strategic Community Impact Plan (SCIP) Impact Council meeting, we concentrated on the Arts, Culture and Tourism Focus Group, which came up with four very specific goals for enhancing, educating, and promoting the cultural and arts environment in Washington County. Subsequent to our SCIP document, funds were available from the Arts, Entertainment and Education Task Force to hire the Sage Policy Group to “provide analytical insight and associated recommendations related to the promotion of cultural richness in Washington County MD.” Their key findings are: 1. Hagerstown should be the core of Washington County's arts, education and entertainment cluster.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | November 21, 2012
The weekend of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, they came from North Dakota, Texas, Massachusetts, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Nebraska, which had the largest contingency, and met with an equal number from Maryland to experience the anniversary and much more. These families all had a common ancestor from Washington County and they were here to celebrate their personal history, as well. This common ancestor, Henry Eavey, entered the colonies in 1732 through Philadelphia, migrated into Maryland very soon thereafter and Washington County (actually Prince George's County at the time)
The Herald-Mail Articles
|