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By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | May 20, 2010
Dear Lynne: I have a vinegar dilemma. In 1982 I bought two 1-gallon plastic jugs of French Beaufor vinegar, champagne and red wine. When I moved in 1987, they accidentally went into a box marked "storage" and have just surfaced now. Will the vinegar still be good? -- Dan in California Dear Dan: First, I've got to say I envy you that Beaufor vinegar. Their cider vinegar is a personal favorite, so I imagine the champagne and red-wine ones must be as fine. Normally, old vinegar, if kept sealed in glass in a cool, dark place, will be fine, perhaps even superb.
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NEWS
By SUSAN SELASKY / Detroit Free Press | November 3, 2009
Braising and Dutch ovens go hand in hand. A Dutch oven, said by some researchers to have been named for the Dutch settlers in Pennsylvania who used similar pots, is a large kettle-type vessel that has a tight-fitting lid. The heavy lid prevents steam from escaping, keeping the moisture in. It's used for slow, moist cooking methods - such as braising - so the end result is a super-tender piece of meat. To braise means to brown on all sides in a small amount of fat. The meat is then cooked, tightly covered, in a small amount of liquid for up to several hours.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | December 26, 2009
Dear Lynne: Every Christmas our family celebrates with the English classic -- roast beef and Yorkshire Pudding. But my mom (who's in her 80s) has lost her touch with the pudding. She used to make the fluffiest you've ever tasted, but the past couple of years it's like lead. We've tried different recipes and different oven temperatures, but nothing works. Could it be because it's cooler here in Atlanta that it was in Los Angeles, where we lived until several years ago? -- Jeff in Atlanta Dear Jeff: Your mom's touch is just swell.
NEWS
By JUDY STARK / St. Petersburg Times | June 16, 2009
Joe Angelone grew up the only boy and the baby in a big Italian family. He learned to cook from scratch, taught by a dozen aunts and uncles. Now he cooks two or three times a week. Once a month he makes a 4-gallon batch of tomato sauce and freezes it. The family serves it lots of ways: over spaghetti; in wife Nanette's eggplant lasagna; in a bowtie pasta and broccoli dish; or in anything that can be enhanced by a little red sauce. The Angelones, of Clearwater, Fla., host all-out pasta fests, and on Christmas Day they're in the kitchen making lasagna, meatballs, spaghetti.
NEWS
May 2, 2004
Anyone who knows the answer is on the way toward winning $50 in The Herald-Mail's Name That Food Contest Do you know what's in the food you eat? The Herald-Mail Co. will award $50 to the person who can correctly name the food product that matches each of the following 10 ingredient lists. Ingredients are listed just about exactly as they appear on specific products, so be just as specific with your answers. Here are some other rules: Herald-Mail employees and their relatives are not eligible to participate.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | August 17, 1999
Salsa translates as "sauce" from both Italian and Spanish and can apply to everything from creamy white sauce to brown gravy. When we hear the word "salsa," it is the tomato- and chili pepper-based mixture that comes to mind. [cont. from lifestyle ] Salsas can go over just about everything on the plate, just like ketchup. In fact, salsa has become so popular, it has surpassed ketchup in pounds consumed per person in the United States. Now that tomatoes and peppers are in season, it's a good time to try your hand at making your own salsa.
NEWS
By Chris Copley | July 10, 2002
I was born in Georgia and lived there for nearly four years before moving back north to my parents' home. But four years was enough time to sample grits, catfish, fried chicken and other traditional Southern foods, courtesy of my mother's adventurous spirit in the kitchen. One Southern specialty, however, missed my mother's culinary attention. I don't think I have ever eaten okra. Okra is the unripe seed pods of a tall flowering plant in the same family as the hibiscus and rose of Sharon bush.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | April 18, 2007
"Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme. " If you asked chef Paul Giannaris which one of these didn't belong, he'd say sage. But, if you asked personal chef Sally McKee, rosemary would be her first answer. While Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel paid respect to sage and rosemary in "Scarborough Fair," Giannaris and McKee say some seasonings don't get the respect or appreciation they deserve. Giannaris, chef and owner of Nick's Airport Inn north of Hagerstown, says he's found sage and curry powder tend to be underused in the local area - not per dish, but in the amount of dishes they're featured in. He's found people shy away from dishes with curry powder when the specials menu lists the seasoning as an ingredient.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | July 14, 2010
If it were up to a contingent of local farmers, political head-butting in Annapolis would relent over a steaming bowl of Head-Buttin' Goat Chili. Washington County Head-Buttin' Goat Chili is what a group of five county residents plan to serve at Gov. Martin O'Malley's Annapolis mansion Thursday during the annual Buy Local Cook Out. The invitation-only cookout showcases recipes made from locally grown foods and launches a statewide Buy Local Challenge initiative to get Marylanders to eat local food for a week - a habit local farmers said they hope would stick.
NEWS
December 8, 1998
Whether served as the first course or the main course, green salads are considered healthful fare. This healthful fare can contain less than 50 calories or more than 400, depending on the dressing you choose. [cont. from lifestyle ] The lettuce is what gives salads their low-calorie image. Whether you select iceberg, Romaine or arugula, lettuce contains between five and 10 calories per cup. Shredded cabbage and spinach also are good choices; they provide more vitamin C than lettuce for only 10 to 15 calories per cup. Most other plain, raw vegetables also are low in calories.
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